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Things I've Learned Over the Years About...Hunting Pants

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September 05, 2013

Things I've Learned Over the Years About...Hunting Pants

By David E. Petzal

I am all for pants, or trousers, whichever, and think that all hunters should wear them unless they are Highland Scots or Greeks.* Here some things I’ve learned about pants over the years.

There are few things worse than tight hunting pants. If your normal waist size is 36 and you buy 36 pants, by the time you finish tucking in longjohns, a couple of undershirts, and a heavy shirt, you’ll find your guts are constricted. Buy one size larger than the waist size you normally take.

Same with the inseam. When I was a kid there was a fashion for “stagging” your pants—having the legs chopped off an inch or so shorter than normal so the bottoms wouldn’t drag through the mud and the blood and the beer. What actually happened was, when you sat down, your shortened trousers hiked halfway up your legs so the wind could blow up  and chill your nasty bits.

 Buy your pants an inch or two longer than usual and tuck them into gaiters. Gaiters, as far as I’m concerned, are one of the great inventions of all time, ranking with air conditioning, the overhead-valve V8 engine, and the colostomy bag. Tuck your pants into gaiters and they will not drag in anything, nor will they flop around your ankles. Tuck them in so your pants bunch at the knee a little bit; that way, when you’re climbing, they won’t pull at your knees. I am embarrassed at the number of years it took me to discover gaiters. Get them in XL so they can accommodate heavy pants, and get quiet ones designed for hunting.

Ranking right up there with gaiters are suspenders, which I will not hunt without either. By the time you hang a knife or two, an ammo pouch, plus God know what else on a pair of weighty trousers, your belt will not support the load unless you cinch it up so tight that it will cause a stoppage between your large and small intestine, leading to fearful side effects. Hang stuff on your belt, but keep your pants up with suspenders. And here a product plug. I find that Filson suspenders rank head and shoulders above all others. Their elastic is strong; the leather button tabs are as stiff and unyielding as poker chips, and will stay that way while lesser tabs will loosen over time and slip off the buttons, leaving your pants down around your ankles.

Rainpants can be useful, but they do not have flys, by and large, leading to all sort of problems which I need not describe here. I think that Gore-Tex-lined wool pants, or something like that with a zipper, are a better solution.
 
*People who live in country that is mostly up and downhill have learned over time that conventional trousers can be pretty unhandy when you’re climbing. Thus, the Scots created the kilt and in the Balkans, Greece, and Albania, a kind of long skirt called the fustanella evolved. In Austria and Switzerland, people climb in knickers and long socks, which I think is preferable to a skirt. Switzerland is the only place I’ve ever seen where people spit shine their hiking boots.

Comments (29)

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from jay wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

Turtleskin gaiters are awesome. I've heard good things about the kenetrek gaiters as well but haven't ever used them.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from elmer f. wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

actually, spit shining hiking boots is most likely a carry over from many years ago. and back then, it may have made sense. a good wax and shine would allow much less dirt and water to stick to the boots. allowing dryer, more comfortable feet. i agree with most of your post. especially the suspenders. unless you walk 30 yards from your truck to your blind, you need SOMETHING to keep your pants in place, which keeps your shirt(s) tucked in, which equates to WARMTH! for me though, the absolute key is a good set of boots. without those, no matter the rest, your going to be miserable. cold, or cold AND wet feet is something no one can stand.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from crm3006 wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

Bib overalls solve all the above mentioned problems, come with built in suspenders, and have all those handy-dandy little pockets, to boot. Wear a belt around them, and the only thing you need to hang on said belt is your handgun.
And yes, buy them a size too large, or even two inches too large in the waist.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from haverodwilltravel wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

Home Run. The young bulls I run with laugh at my suspenders and extra waist..... but I get the last laugh watching them climb with one hand behind their back pulling up their pants and when they can't get comfortable sitting down.
I told them " Stop dressing for the 20 minutes you spend talking to the waitress in the diner. It's hunting, not a fashion show,"

:)

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from RipperIII wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

Here in the deep South I find it comforting to tuck my pant legs into my snake boots for most of the season, I can not fathom hunting in shorts or a skirt...thorns and biting critters are too plentiful.
When temps finally dip into the 20's or so, bib overalls are the ticket.
On the rare occasion that I sit in a shooting house, I simply pack in a wool blanket.
The biggest challenge down here is working your way to your stand with out getting soaked in your own sweat only to have it freeze upon sitting down to hunt.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pathfinder1 wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

Hi...

You're right about the gaiters, Dave...or as others might call them...'leggings'.

It is difficult for me to get a proper fit, unfortunately, and I find many of them rather steeply priced.

I've gotten a few pairs of them, and they were just too small. I'm kinda 'fluffy', if you know what I mean. Plus being tall and wearing a size sixteen boot.

But I won't give up the search for the proper fit and proper price.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

Agree with suspenders & extra waist and inseam numbers, but for me I like Filson heavy tin pants to turn things that stab and, these pants are good in turning water. In super cold I prefer Euro military surplus wool pants [I can't afford USA wool bibs]

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

There are several points in here that back-up my reasons to wear BDU britches,
1. It has large pockets to carry just about anything you need, and they button so there is no flapping around.
2. They have cinch tabs to supplement any belt (or suspenders), and a side note they have button flies to avoid any problems that might occur from a zipper fly. ;-0
3. They come in camo, which I understand is very popular for some reason.
4. There are little ribbons (string is more masculine) in the ankles to tighten up the pant leg so you can tuck it into a boot and lace up the boot on top of it.
5. They come in sizes for everyone.
6. Due to #5. they are roomy enough for freedom of movement doing just about anything.
And the list goes on!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

I do wear suspenders, much to the amusement of some of my colleagues, but I find that tucking my trousers into my boot tops can get uncomfortable while hiking about, so I still blouse my trousers (with blousing garters) - a throwback to military days.
I agree with Mark-1. Some of the best wool trousers I've worn in freezing weather were Dutch or German issue. Gaiters make a great deal of sense to me, and I've worn them, but some of the nylon cordura gaiters make an odd noise in the brush and I may as well announce my approach to the game with a public address system.
A +1 for you, crm3006. Carhart's black or dark brown bib overalls have been good to me.
I've purchased a few Filson products and I recommend them without hesitation, but they put a dent in my checking account.
As usual, Dave Petzal makes a lot of sense.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from PbHead wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

Dave, I always find much to ponder in you fashion advice.
I get most of my clothing from the work section of the local Farm & Home store.

Another vote for bib overalls. If you get the plain brown, you can tell your wife you need them for yard work.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from stick500 wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

what a great article- lots of useful info

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

I have been wearing Filson clothing for many, many years now and they are the ultimate premier garments. Yes, they are expensive, but in the long run they are also by far the cheapest, inasmuch as they are almost impossible to wear out and so seldom if ever need replacing. A couple of my heavy wool jackets were purchased over 30 years ago and despite much use are still like new. Viva Filson! I also highly recommend Ravenwear hunting clothing, which is top drawer.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ples0017 wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

I am 33 and have worn suspenders for every day I have deer hunted.
Can't agree more on everything you said

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

I prefer suspenders that button to the alligator clip type. If you need to attach or re sew buttons I use dental floss for thread. It is tough stuff. I do not use suspenders in the tropics feel they are too restrictive for air flow. Here in our Rockies, suspenders are the only way I can keep my pants up.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Marion Johnson wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

Grandpap said, "Never trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders....he don't even trust his own britches"

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Marion Johnson wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

I like the suspenders sold by Duluth Trading Co which attach to each SIDE of your trousers. They don't end up in the pile if you have to squat to answer nature's call. Perhaps I have some canine in my genes; I often have to answer that call shortly after entering the woods to hunt. Somehow this seldom happens if I am in the forest to work.

I sew a loop of paracord on each side of my pants to hook the catches into to prevent them sometimes popping off when working.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Robert Dawson wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

Miltary BDU pants are about perfect in the out of doors

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackjac wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

Check out Deluth Trading Co. on the web. They sell "truckers suspenders. They're very wide and designed for truckers who --no brainer-are always sitting when working. They have two monster metal clips that clip to the SIDES of your pants, rather than front and back. If you have the NEED to drop your drawers, jus unclip each side. Worth a look. Deluth guarantees everything they sell.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

I am jumping on the BDU train. Mine have the tie straps and zippers on the legs and I still tuck them into my boots and wear them with suspenders.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 31 weeks 4 days ago

What one wears is certainly going to depend a lot on the kind of hunting that's done. Bibs would be fine for ice fishing or sitting in a blind. I spent my career chasing elk and deer usually in heavy snow. Bibs would be absolutely insufferable for that kind of hunting. I have worn suspenders on my wool pants but find they often restrict air too much and I get sweaty which is very bad news in subzero conditions. Gators will do the same thing. In some conditions gators would definitely be welcome - when the freezing snow sticks to pants and makes a noisy mess. I don't have ammo, pistols, knives or anything else hanging on my belt. That stuff goes in my daypack or maybe in the cargo pocket of my wool pants. Rainpants with elastic waist are fine even if they don't have a fly. One can get them down in a hurry if necessary.

It's fine to go one size up on waist but look closely at the belt loops. More is better and less is hell if the waist is a bit too large. The pants edge will keep rolling behind the belt and that is NOT comfortable. Make sure the belt is almost too wide for the loops if the waist is baggy. Having to force a thick belt through the loops can help eliminate the rolling effect. NEVER wear a belt that's way too thin for the belt loops.

Baggy pants provide more freedom of movement but that also can be a bad thing. I'm nursing some chaff on the insides of my thighs from a long and very interesting hike yesterday to my old fishing camp (see story in answers section). Also, if at some point in your hunting adventure you plan on getting in the saddle DO NOT wear baggy jeans or anything with the least bit of synthetic material. Cowboys wear tight cotton jeans and they don't do it for fashion's sake.

If it's cold out I wear jeans with wool pants pulled over them. If it's REALLY cold out (say -20) I'll wear long johns as added base layer. If you're a stalker like me make sure the wool pants contain a good portion of nylon fiber or they will wear out in a season. The military German wool pants have quite a bit of nylon content and a good fine weave. However, finding military surplus pants that fit properly can sometimes be problematic as the length is usually tailored to an individual. An outfit up here in Canada makes a very fine and affordable wool pants. I think the name is Big John or something like that. I'll look at them when I get home. JC Penney used to make excellent logger style wool pants but I haven't been in a store for 25 years.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jhjimbo wrote 31 weeks 4 days ago

For small game and early big game my 30year old Carhart camo pants have been serving me well. Suspenders(Craftsman contractor type) and a strong belt are worn together. When the mercury falls, out come the Filson bibs and double Mackinaw parka and I am set to go. Some Underarmor keeps me dry and toasty. I have the synthetic parkas and bibs but lean toward the 100% wool Filson. Gators are not that necessary where I am but I do bring them along when I go to the Adirondacks or Xcountry skiing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from retoohs wrote 31 weeks 4 days ago

I had a stroke in 1995. I have worn Bibs ever since. I liked Schmidt bibs from tractor supply but they quit carrying them. I have bib cameo for small game hunting. Orange bibs for deer hunting and a pair of leather bibs for motorcycle riding. Stroke left my whole right side paralyzed had to switch throttle on cycle, quad, & truck. Life for this old hunter (73) goes on. Never give up.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 31 weeks 4 days ago

I had an expensive pair of Carhart camo dungaree pants and they didn't last through two goose hunting seasons! Was extremely disappointed given the price of the things. The bottoms get shredded. Canvas wears well on the flat areas but edges (e.g. hems and pockets) seem to fray in short order. I think finer weave wears better.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 31 weeks 4 days ago

When I started hunting, there was a product called "cast iron britches," made of some heavy grade canvas that were ideal for hunting in briars. I haven't thought about that for years.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 31 weeks 4 days ago

A friend or two has been known to utter the phrase "It's just a pushrod. You know, outdated technology." after doing something you do when you have one.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Steve in Virginia wrote 31 weeks 2 days ago

Haven't tried gaiters, but I'll definitely endorse the Filson suspenders -- and the Filson wool pants for that matter. But those come out when it starts to get cold in the late season. For the bulk of the deer season in Virginia, a pair of BDUs (or something similar -- I like Cabelas Microtex BDU-style pants in Outfiter Camo) or Carharts, paired with a good base layer, work fine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 31 weeks 2 days ago

Filson's makes a pant , I believe it is called a wool whipcord, or some such thing. It has a bit of a hard finish, is wind resistant, and pretty comfortable if wet. Much less bulky than a regular wool pant. It does not take up a lot of room in a duffle packed for air travel . They are not noisy walking in cover and you can readily crawl over rocks. Have used them all over the Rockies, Canada Alaska, and a half dozen Central Asia countries in serious weather. I like them loose fitting with suspenders in bad weather. Have a closet full of Filson's gear from lightweight to heavy. I have spent little time in Eastern Whitetail tree stands, so no advice for that type of clothing

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from delweaver wrote 23 weeks 4 days ago

I have a set of fleece pants and fleece jacket from russell outdoors I bought them when I hunted in AK. They have worked great so far in VA during some of the warmer weather of hunting season it can be a little hot, but during those cold morning and night hunts they work great. I have used fleece in every expedition I did in AK it is much warmer than wool and drys much faster as well.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from delweaver wrote 23 weeks 4 days ago

I have a set of fleece pants and fleece jacket from russell outdoors I bought them when I hunted in AK. They have worked great so far in VA during some of the warmer weather of hunting season it can be a little hot, but during those cold morning and night hunts they work great. I have used fleece in every expedition I did in AK it is much warmer than wool and drys much faster as well.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from crm3006 wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

Bib overalls solve all the above mentioned problems, come with built in suspenders, and have all those handy-dandy little pockets, to boot. Wear a belt around them, and the only thing you need to hang on said belt is your handgun.
And yes, buy them a size too large, or even two inches too large in the waist.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from mspl8sdcntryboy wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

There are several points in here that back-up my reasons to wear BDU britches,
1. It has large pockets to carry just about anything you need, and they button so there is no flapping around.
2. They have cinch tabs to supplement any belt (or suspenders), and a side note they have button flies to avoid any problems that might occur from a zipper fly. ;-0
3. They come in camo, which I understand is very popular for some reason.
4. There are little ribbons (string is more masculine) in the ankles to tighten up the pant leg so you can tuck it into a boot and lace up the boot on top of it.
5. They come in sizes for everyone.
6. Due to #5. they are roomy enough for freedom of movement doing just about anything.
And the list goes on!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from haverodwilltravel wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

Home Run. The young bulls I run with laugh at my suspenders and extra waist..... but I get the last laugh watching them climb with one hand behind their back pulling up their pants and when they can't get comfortable sitting down.
I told them " Stop dressing for the 20 minutes you spend talking to the waitress in the diner. It's hunting, not a fashion show,"

:)

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

I do wear suspenders, much to the amusement of some of my colleagues, but I find that tucking my trousers into my boot tops can get uncomfortable while hiking about, so I still blouse my trousers (with blousing garters) - a throwback to military days.
I agree with Mark-1. Some of the best wool trousers I've worn in freezing weather were Dutch or German issue. Gaiters make a great deal of sense to me, and I've worn them, but some of the nylon cordura gaiters make an odd noise in the brush and I may as well announce my approach to the game with a public address system.
A +1 for you, crm3006. Carhart's black or dark brown bib overalls have been good to me.
I've purchased a few Filson products and I recommend them without hesitation, but they put a dent in my checking account.
As usual, Dave Petzal makes a lot of sense.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from elmer f. wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

actually, spit shining hiking boots is most likely a carry over from many years ago. and back then, it may have made sense. a good wax and shine would allow much less dirt and water to stick to the boots. allowing dryer, more comfortable feet. i agree with most of your post. especially the suspenders. unless you walk 30 yards from your truck to your blind, you need SOMETHING to keep your pants in place, which keeps your shirt(s) tucked in, which equates to WARMTH! for me though, the absolute key is a good set of boots. without those, no matter the rest, your going to be miserable. cold, or cold AND wet feet is something no one can stand.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RipperIII wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

Here in the deep South I find it comforting to tuck my pant legs into my snake boots for most of the season, I can not fathom hunting in shorts or a skirt...thorns and biting critters are too plentiful.
When temps finally dip into the 20's or so, bib overalls are the ticket.
On the rare occasion that I sit in a shooting house, I simply pack in a wool blanket.
The biggest challenge down here is working your way to your stand with out getting soaked in your own sweat only to have it freeze upon sitting down to hunt.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

I prefer suspenders that button to the alligator clip type. If you need to attach or re sew buttons I use dental floss for thread. It is tough stuff. I do not use suspenders in the tropics feel they are too restrictive for air flow. Here in our Rockies, suspenders are the only way I can keep my pants up.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Marion Johnson wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

Grandpap said, "Never trust a man who wears both a belt and suspenders....he don't even trust his own britches"

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Marion Johnson wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

I like the suspenders sold by Duluth Trading Co which attach to each SIDE of your trousers. They don't end up in the pile if you have to squat to answer nature's call. Perhaps I have some canine in my genes; I often have to answer that call shortly after entering the woods to hunt. Somehow this seldom happens if I am in the forest to work.

I sew a loop of paracord on each side of my pants to hook the catches into to prevent them sometimes popping off when working.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 31 weeks 4 days ago

When I started hunting, there was a product called "cast iron britches," made of some heavy grade canvas that were ideal for hunting in briars. I haven't thought about that for years.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jay wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

Turtleskin gaiters are awesome. I've heard good things about the kenetrek gaiters as well but haven't ever used them.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Pathfinder1 wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

Hi...

You're right about the gaiters, Dave...or as others might call them...'leggings'.

It is difficult for me to get a proper fit, unfortunately, and I find many of them rather steeply priced.

I've gotten a few pairs of them, and they were just too small. I'm kinda 'fluffy', if you know what I mean. Plus being tall and wearing a size sixteen boot.

But I won't give up the search for the proper fit and proper price.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 31 weeks 6 days ago

Agree with suspenders & extra waist and inseam numbers, but for me I like Filson heavy tin pants to turn things that stab and, these pants are good in turning water. In super cold I prefer Euro military surplus wool pants [I can't afford USA wool bibs]

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PbHead wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

Dave, I always find much to ponder in you fashion advice.
I get most of my clothing from the work section of the local Farm & Home store.

Another vote for bib overalls. If you get the plain brown, you can tell your wife you need them for yard work.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from stick500 wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

what a great article- lots of useful info

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

I have been wearing Filson clothing for many, many years now and they are the ultimate premier garments. Yes, they are expensive, but in the long run they are also by far the cheapest, inasmuch as they are almost impossible to wear out and so seldom if ever need replacing. A couple of my heavy wool jackets were purchased over 30 years ago and despite much use are still like new. Viva Filson! I also highly recommend Ravenwear hunting clothing, which is top drawer.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ples0017 wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

I am 33 and have worn suspenders for every day I have deer hunted.
Can't agree more on everything you said

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Robert Dawson wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

Miltary BDU pants are about perfect in the out of doors

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from blackjac wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

Check out Deluth Trading Co. on the web. They sell "truckers suspenders. They're very wide and designed for truckers who --no brainer-are always sitting when working. They have two monster metal clips that clip to the SIDES of your pants, rather than front and back. If you have the NEED to drop your drawers, jus unclip each side. Worth a look. Deluth guarantees everything they sell.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 31 weeks 5 days ago

I am jumping on the BDU train. Mine have the tie straps and zippers on the legs and I still tuck them into my boots and wear them with suspenders.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 31 weeks 4 days ago

What one wears is certainly going to depend a lot on the kind of hunting that's done. Bibs would be fine for ice fishing or sitting in a blind. I spent my career chasing elk and deer usually in heavy snow. Bibs would be absolutely insufferable for that kind of hunting. I have worn suspenders on my wool pants but find they often restrict air too much and I get sweaty which is very bad news in subzero conditions. Gators will do the same thing. In some conditions gators would definitely be welcome - when the freezing snow sticks to pants and makes a noisy mess. I don't have ammo, pistols, knives or anything else hanging on my belt. That stuff goes in my daypack or maybe in the cargo pocket of my wool pants. Rainpants with elastic waist are fine even if they don't have a fly. One can get them down in a hurry if necessary.

It's fine to go one size up on waist but look closely at the belt loops. More is better and less is hell if the waist is a bit too large. The pants edge will keep rolling behind the belt and that is NOT comfortable. Make sure the belt is almost too wide for the loops if the waist is baggy. Having to force a thick belt through the loops can help eliminate the rolling effect. NEVER wear a belt that's way too thin for the belt loops.

Baggy pants provide more freedom of movement but that also can be a bad thing. I'm nursing some chaff on the insides of my thighs from a long and very interesting hike yesterday to my old fishing camp (see story in answers section). Also, if at some point in your hunting adventure you plan on getting in the saddle DO NOT wear baggy jeans or anything with the least bit of synthetic material. Cowboys wear tight cotton jeans and they don't do it for fashion's sake.

If it's cold out I wear jeans with wool pants pulled over them. If it's REALLY cold out (say -20) I'll wear long johns as added base layer. If you're a stalker like me make sure the wool pants contain a good portion of nylon fiber or they will wear out in a season. The military German wool pants have quite a bit of nylon content and a good fine weave. However, finding military surplus pants that fit properly can sometimes be problematic as the length is usually tailored to an individual. An outfit up here in Canada makes a very fine and affordable wool pants. I think the name is Big John or something like that. I'll look at them when I get home. JC Penney used to make excellent logger style wool pants but I haven't been in a store for 25 years.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jhjimbo wrote 31 weeks 4 days ago

For small game and early big game my 30year old Carhart camo pants have been serving me well. Suspenders(Craftsman contractor type) and a strong belt are worn together. When the mercury falls, out come the Filson bibs and double Mackinaw parka and I am set to go. Some Underarmor keeps me dry and toasty. I have the synthetic parkas and bibs but lean toward the 100% wool Filson. Gators are not that necessary where I am but I do bring them along when I go to the Adirondacks or Xcountry skiing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from retoohs wrote 31 weeks 4 days ago

I had a stroke in 1995. I have worn Bibs ever since. I liked Schmidt bibs from tractor supply but they quit carrying them. I have bib cameo for small game hunting. Orange bibs for deer hunting and a pair of leather bibs for motorcycle riding. Stroke left my whole right side paralyzed had to switch throttle on cycle, quad, & truck. Life for this old hunter (73) goes on. Never give up.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 31 weeks 4 days ago

A friend or two has been known to utter the phrase "It's just a pushrod. You know, outdated technology." after doing something you do when you have one.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Steve in Virginia wrote 31 weeks 2 days ago

Haven't tried gaiters, but I'll definitely endorse the Filson suspenders -- and the Filson wool pants for that matter. But those come out when it starts to get cold in the late season. For the bulk of the deer season in Virginia, a pair of BDUs (or something similar -- I like Cabelas Microtex BDU-style pants in Outfiter Camo) or Carharts, paired with a good base layer, work fine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 31 weeks 2 days ago

Filson's makes a pant , I believe it is called a wool whipcord, or some such thing. It has a bit of a hard finish, is wind resistant, and pretty comfortable if wet. Much less bulky than a regular wool pant. It does not take up a lot of room in a duffle packed for air travel . They are not noisy walking in cover and you can readily crawl over rocks. Have used them all over the Rockies, Canada Alaska, and a half dozen Central Asia countries in serious weather. I like them loose fitting with suspenders in bad weather. Have a closet full of Filson's gear from lightweight to heavy. I have spent little time in Eastern Whitetail tree stands, so no advice for that type of clothing

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from delweaver wrote 23 weeks 4 days ago

I have a set of fleece pants and fleece jacket from russell outdoors I bought them when I hunted in AK. They have worked great so far in VA during some of the warmer weather of hunting season it can be a little hot, but during those cold morning and night hunts they work great. I have used fleece in every expedition I did in AK it is much warmer than wool and drys much faster as well.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from delweaver wrote 23 weeks 4 days ago

I have a set of fleece pants and fleece jacket from russell outdoors I bought them when I hunted in AK. They have worked great so far in VA during some of the warmer weather of hunting season it can be a little hot, but during those cold morning and night hunts they work great. I have used fleece in every expedition I did in AK it is much warmer than wool and drys much faster as well.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 31 weeks 4 days ago

I had an expensive pair of Carhart camo dungaree pants and they didn't last through two goose hunting seasons! Was extremely disappointed given the price of the things. The bottoms get shredded. Canvas wears well on the flat areas but edges (e.g. hems and pockets) seem to fray in short order. I think finer weave wears better.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

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