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The Southerner’s Handbook: A Guide to Living the Good Life

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January 28, 2014

The Southerner’s Handbook: A Guide to Living the Good Life

By David E. Petzal

Garden & Gun, a bimonthly magazine which is published in Charleston, South Carolina, is the unlikeliest magazine ever to become successful, win awards, and achieve a national circulation of 700,000. In fact, it is the oddest concept to take root since the British comedy team of Peter Cook and Dudley Moore invented a restaurant called “The Frog and Peach” (“You never know when you’re going to want a bloody great frog and a really smashing peach”) and goddamn if it didn’t take off in the real world. But I digress.

Garden & Gun is a lifestyle magazine which, in its words, covers “the best of the South, including the sporting culture, the food, the music, the art, the literature, the people and their ideas.” One reason it has succeeded is that it employs only first-rate talent. Its previous Editor in Chief was Sid Evans, who was head honcho at Field & Stream, and its current Main Man is David DiBenedetto, who was a Features Editor at F&S. Eddie Nickens is a regular contributor, and I get in a lick once in a while.

Now, G&G has graced us with The Southerner’s Handbook, an elegant volume of 287 pages that is described as a guide to living the good life below the Mason-Dixon Line. But before I describe it in more detail, I have to point out what it is not—and that is, a handbook for the Southern Dumbass, as exemplified by Larry the Cable Guy, the crew of Duck Dynasty, and so on. No sir. This is a book for people who have all of their teeth, use indoor plumbing, and know who William Faulkner is.

There is much here to interest hunters, fishermen, shooters, and cooks. There is also advice on how to tell a story, deal with venomous serpents, drink like a Southerner, say goodbye, fall off a horse, wear cowboy boots, behave, and all sorts of unlikely and wonderful stuff that is applicable even if you live in a cultural wasteland like the North.

The Southerner’s Handbook is published by Harper Collins, and costs $27.99. To me, the price is justified simply by learning that Roy Blount, Jr. owns a spade called Hrothgar the Not Very Rusty, but really, the whole book is a delight. You can get it from Amazon and the other usual suspects.

 

Comments (29)

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from Steve in Virginia wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

I've had occasion to peruse Garden & Gun and agree it's very good. The book sounds interesting -- didn't know there was a right way to fall off of a horse. I've had some practice here and hope I did it right.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Douglas wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Ahh. My daughter is always looking for ideas for a birthday present for old pop. I'll put this in her head.
Wasn't David DiBenedetto the former Mans best friend blogster?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MICHMAN wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Bobby Cole mentions Gun & Garden magazine in his new book, "Moon Underfoot." I thought it was a fictional magazine. Have to check it out!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from blueticker wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

I don't know where you've visited down south, but you might be surprised how many of us have "all of our teeth & indoor plumbing", not to mention at least a vague recollection of Faulkner if not more. We also tend not to have much to say regarding our northern cousins, unless they come to visit and overstay their welcome. I have spent enough time up north to know that we have no monopoly on rednecks down south,a fact you might have noticed also around deer camps up north, where you can "fart without first looking around to see if anyone might be offended."
You are dead on re G&G magazine, & I am glad you brought the book to light, I will soon have one.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from SMC1986 wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Douglas,
Yes it is the same person and Pritchard was even mentioned in the latest issue if I remember correctly. I've had a subscription for going on 2 years I think and it is an amazing magazine. Too bad it only comes every other month. At least I have F&S to get me through!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from philbourjaily wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

If I remember correctly, the only dishes on the menu at the Frog and Peach were Frog a la Peach and Peach a la Frog. Thanks for reminding me of that sketch which I hadn't thought about it in years.

G&G is a good magazine, too, with lots to read even for those of us who live far above the Mason Dixon line.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Sales of the above should be limited to zip codes south of the Mason-Dixon and east of the Red River without exception.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

My Chef brother Matthew made some contributions to said magazine and I am considering resubscribing to it, Outdoorlife,and Field and Stream, but in an effort to declutter I like many readers often enjoy digital versions of the articles as the city will only remind you so many times that they can't recycle shiny magazine paper. The only thing I don't like about the magazine is that it over glamorizes real Southern living where many people grew up without dental insurance and spent time on rural farms with outhouses, trailers, and dilapidated shacks. As for literature those of us with real taste read Douglas C. Jones. Cheers from the Real South where 50 yard 5 shot groups aren't mentioned unless they are accomplished free handed.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

WAM

"...east of the Red River..."

Now I may not be of the genteel nature of a mint julep sippin', white suited Southern Colonel, but my paternal grandmother was a magnolia blossom of Mobile society before trekking to East Texas to spread charm sweet as Tupelo honey and my maternal grandfather was a Tarheel of the finest sort.
Even THEY both knew the Red (Rio Rojo to use the local vernacular!) River springs to life from a gouge in the high Texas plains know as Palo Dura Canyon and eventually spills it's silt-laden life blood (it's too thick to drink and too thin to plow!) into the Mighty Mississippi near the Atchafalaya Basin!
There may be some southerly flow to it's meanderings and geographers mau consider it's flow "north to south".
But by Gawd Almighty's blessing, it flows WEST to EAST!
NORTH of the Red is Sooners!
SOUTH of the Red is Texicans!
There AIN'T no "...east of the Ref River..."!. Not the "Suthun" Red anyway!
It is my sincerest hope thay you might pass this information on to your fellow UA alumni!

Deepest Regards

FirstBubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Them poor misguided Texas boys what have unseemly "Yankee" leanings travel to Norman, Okla to play football at that scurrilous outfit, OU!
They dubbed their school OU, but call it the University of Oklahoma.
Do the have dyslexia?
If it's "OU", shouldn't they call it "Oklahoma University"?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Oh, snap...no he din'nt.

Actually Mtnhunter, I've never been south of the M-D line, but I used to watch "The Andy Griffeth Show." You guys are good people.

PS: I am typing this slowly, because I know y'all can't read real fast.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Mr. McClure

My great uncle died at the age of 98 in 1973.
He came to east Texas from North Carolina by steam boat to Houston, Texas where he was greeted by mud streets and a tent city. He then traveled by steam packet up the Trinity River to Magnolia Ferry where he was "whisked" into Palestine, Texas by horse drawn carriage. There he found boardwalks, opera houses and the locomotive foundry of the I&GN Railroad.
When his sainted wife turned 80 years of age, he finally gave up on the idea that "ain't nobody gonna shπ inside my house" and had an indoor toilet installed for "her" convenience!
Don't tell ME Southern folk ain't "stylish"!
BTW!
Uncle Morris never had a drivers license and worked his farm horse back or a WWII jeep. At age 96, the Jeep died and he bought another horse. A gentleman in the community, knowing Uncle Morris did not have a license, was hauling his horse home for him.
Jokingly he asked, "Uncle Morris. How old do you think a man should be when he quits messing with women?"
Sitting sapling tall and straight he answered, "Boy, give me a good clean woman and I can father a child quick as you can!"

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

From what I have experienced Texas has 5 very distinctive "states" or unique regions, coastal Texas, North Texas, West Texas, East Texas, and Austin. Anyone care to expound on this observation?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

WAM

"...east of the Red River..."

Now I may not be of the genteel nature of a mint julep sippin', white suited Southern Colonel, but my paternal grandmother was a magnolia blossom of Mobile society before trekking to East Texas to spread charm sweet as Tupelo honey and my maternal grandfather was a Tarheel of the finest sort.
Even THEY both knew the Red (Rio Rojo to use the local vernacular!) River springs to life from a gouge in the high Texas plains know as Palo Dura Canyon and eventually spills it's silt-laden life blood (it's too thick to drink and too thin to plow!) into the Mighty Mississippi near the Atchafalaya Basin!
There may be some southerly flow to it's meanderings and geographers mau consider it's flow "north to south".
But by Gawd Almighty's blessing, it flows WEST to EAST!
NORTH of the Red is Sooners!
SOUTH of the Red is Texicans!
There AIN'T no "...east of the Ref River..."!. Not the "Suthun" Red anyway!
It is my sincerest hope thay you might pass this information on to your fellow UA alumni!

Deepest Regards

FirstBubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

WAM

"...east of the Red River..."

Now I may not be of the genteel nature of a mint julep sippin', white suited Southern Colonel, but my paternal grandmother was a magnolia blossom of Mobile society before trekking to East Texas to spread charm sweet as Tupelo honey and my maternal grandfather was a Tarheel of the finest sort.
Even THEY both knew the Red (Rio Rojo to use the local vernacular!) River springs to life from a gouge in the high Texas plains know as Palo Dura Canyon and eventually spills it's silt-laden life blood (it's too thick to drink and too thin to plow!) into the Mighty Mississippi near the Atchafalaya Basin!
There may be some southerly flow to it's meanderings and geographers mau consider it's flow "north to south".
But by Gawd Almighty's blessing, it flows WEST to EAST!
NORTH of the Red is Sooners!
SOUTH of the Red is Texicans!
There AIN'T no "...east of the Ref River..."!. Not the "Suthun" Red anyway!
It is my sincerest hope thay you might pass this information on to your fellow UA alumni!

Deepest Regards

FirstBubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Texans ain't Southerners, neither are Sooners. Pshaw, close but no cigar. By some skulduggery, two of those non-southern teams were sneaked into the SEC. Only southern states west of the Mississippi are Arkansas (maybe) an Louisiana ( for sure). Having lots of trailer parks and rednecks does not make you Southern by definition.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Having grown up north of the Ohio River and lived over 30 years of my life south of it I have to say I much prefer the south. The women dress up all the time, even to go to the grocery store and the food is infinitely better. Southern women treat men much better too. Southern Hospitality at its finest.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

If Texans ain't "Southern", gravy don't go on biscuits!
Sooners?
Scourge of the earth!
We had are own "conference"! The SWC! Sadly, they didn't ask me!
I've swilled my share of chicory.
WAM - all in jest, amigo!

Tim Platt
Ever hear if "Northern" cooking? LOL!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

Bubba - all in good fun for sure! American by birth, Southern by the grace of God! :-)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

Bubba, Northerners tend to over cook things, Atlanta, Shiloh, New Orleans...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 1uglymutha wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

A genteel southern belle once informed me that a "Yankee" is defined as anyone who lives north of Interstate 10.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from The_UTP wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

I'd love to read this book! I grew up in Missouri, parts of which desperately yearn to be Southern but are most decidedly not, even if they had a pretty good run this year in the SEC. I dated one true Southern Belle when I was in college, and that was when I found out that I know nothing, nothing at all about real Southern culture.

Interestingly, I think you could make a case that, depending on whom you count as Southern and which era you want discuss, the South has produced the best truly American literature. (Of course I'm still claiming America's finest writer, Mark Twain, for Missouri.) The South's also where the blues come from, which means it's where jazz, rock and roll, hip hop and R&B all come from.

One of the saddest side-effects of modern mass media is the way in which it's erasing regional accents. Being a Missouri boy, I can tell a high-class Georgian from a Missouri hillbilly from a Red Dirt Okie from a drawling Texan. I love all those accents, but they're disappearing into one New York-California mishmash.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dallas A. McWhorter wrote 11 weeks 1 day ago

Despite the fact that where I was raised and reside in Texas is south of every other state except Florida, I don not and never will identify as a southerner. I am a Texan or a southwesterner. And Drew, in my opinion there are generally six different parts to Texas; South Texas, Central Texas, West Texas, North Texas, East Texas (which, despite what WAM says, is part of the south), and The Texas Hill Country, which is in both South and Central Texas. I should know, after all, I was born and raised in Texas, my family was part of the Old 300, 1 (and if letters from his family to the Texas Government are to be believed 2) of my ancestors (he was an uncle) fought and died at the Alamo, my ancestor's (the same one who died at the Alamo) oxen were uses to haul The Come And Take It Cannon, another ancestor (also an uncle) was in a small party that avoided being captcherd at Goliad and was across the river when Fanin and his men were massacred so he probably watched the massacre happen, and one if my grandfathers fought at the first battle at Goliad and signed the Goliad Declaration of Independence.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dallas A. McWhorter wrote 11 weeks 1 day ago

Despite the fact that where I was raised and reside in Texas is south of every other state except Florida, I don not and never will identify as a southerner. I am a Texan or a southwesterner. And Drew, in my opinion there are generally six different parts to Texas; South Texas, Central Texas, West Texas, North Texas, East Texas (which, despite what WAM says, is, unfortunantly, part of the south), and The Texas Hill Country, which is in both South and Central Texas. I should know, after all, I was born and raised in Texas, my family first came to Texas as part of the Old 300, 1 (and if letters from his family to the Texas Government are to be believed 2) of my ancestors (he was an uncle) fought and died at the Alamo, my ancestor's (the same one who died at the Alamo) oxen were uses to haul The Come And Take It Cannon, another ancestor (also an uncle) was in a small party that avoided being captcherd at Goliad and was across the river when Fanin and his men were massacred so he probably watched the massacre happen, and one if my grandfathers fought at the first battle at Goliad and signed the Goliad Declaration of Independence. I guess you could I'm, I don't know, a Texan by Nature maybe?

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from Dallas A. McWhorter wrote 11 weeks 1 day ago

Correction-...could say...

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from Shellcracker wrote 11 weeks 18 hours ago

Geographic lines are comical to me. There are guys in New York City that can out fish, hunt or trap guys from Alaska. There are people in the heart of Mississippi that drive a Mercedes Benz and have never heard of a deer drag or baited a hook. What state you live in does not speak for who you are as a person, a hunter, a fisher or an outdoorsman. I find myself more at home swapping hunting and fishing stories with people I have met from the Dakotas, Illinois or Pennsylvania than some people in the southern state I live in. You mean to tell me that if you drive 1 mile from Indiana to Kentucky that it is now acceptable to drink mint juleps and watch horse racing or that because your great great great grandpappy charged up the hill with General Beauregard that you can't drink a boilermaker or eat a Philly cheesesteak? I think 99% of us don't fall into the category of believing those things. I find however that most of the time, people that talk about the South the loudest and with the most bragadoccio, are the 1% of aristocracy that want to portray themselves as some sort of 1850s plantation owner and romanticize it and make quips about the north or northerners etc. The rest of us are pretty laid back. Every part of every state is different from the rest and every person from every part is different from the other. All that ranting aside, I do buy the aformentioned magazine on occasion and enjoy it, especially the pictures of the dressed up lady folk, expensive shotguns I will never be able to afford, articles on conservation and highlights of various alcoholic spirits and food. You just have to remember not to take yourself too seriously.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hassan Abdul-Wahid wrote 10 weeks 5 days ago

My parents, who have lived in Savannah, GA for the last twenty years, just got me a subscription to G&G. I get the distinct feeling I'm the only one in Los Angeles with a subscription to this fine magazine. I'm an LA native but every time I receive an issue I get the feeling that I should move to the South.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FSU70 wrote 9 weeks 3 days ago

Anyone from Texas who says they aren't southern doesn't know their own history. Considering Texas was settled by southerners from Tennessee, Kentucky with some Gawjah folks thrown in. That being said, I've been an off and on subscriber of Garden & Guns for a number of years. They are southern and they write well of the charms of the south and it's history and culture. However they are mostly made up of "Liberal" southern writers and that has a tendency to turn me off. They are of the "Charleston " southern elite and piss me off from time to time. But then they come up with a good article by Rick Bragg of Alabama or Georgia Wallace or some great pictures of southern dogs and I get reeled in again. So for me it is a love, not hate but dislike relationship. But all in all more Southern than Southern Living Magazine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FSU70 wrote 9 weeks 3 days ago

P.S. the Sainted Sam Houston was born in Virginia and fought in the battle of Horse Shoe Bend with Andy Jackson down in Alabama long before he came to Texas !

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Post a Comment

from blueticker wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

I don't know where you've visited down south, but you might be surprised how many of us have "all of our teeth & indoor plumbing", not to mention at least a vague recollection of Faulkner if not more. We also tend not to have much to say regarding our northern cousins, unless they come to visit and overstay their welcome. I have spent enough time up north to know that we have no monopoly on rednecks down south,a fact you might have noticed also around deer camps up north, where you can "fart without first looking around to see if anyone might be offended."
You are dead on re G&G magazine, & I am glad you brought the book to light, I will soon have one.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

My Chef brother Matthew made some contributions to said magazine and I am considering resubscribing to it, Outdoorlife,and Field and Stream, but in an effort to declutter I like many readers often enjoy digital versions of the articles as the city will only remind you so many times that they can't recycle shiny magazine paper. The only thing I don't like about the magazine is that it over glamorizes real Southern living where many people grew up without dental insurance and spent time on rural farms with outhouses, trailers, and dilapidated shacks. As for literature those of us with real taste read Douglas C. Jones. Cheers from the Real South where 50 yard 5 shot groups aren't mentioned unless they are accomplished free handed.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Having grown up north of the Ohio River and lived over 30 years of my life south of it I have to say I much prefer the south. The women dress up all the time, even to go to the grocery store and the food is infinitely better. Southern women treat men much better too. Southern Hospitality at its finest.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Steve in Virginia wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

I've had occasion to peruse Garden & Gun and agree it's very good. The book sounds interesting -- didn't know there was a right way to fall off of a horse. I've had some practice here and hope I did it right.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Douglas wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Ahh. My daughter is always looking for ideas for a birthday present for old pop. I'll put this in her head.
Wasn't David DiBenedetto the former Mans best friend blogster?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MICHMAN wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Bobby Cole mentions Gun & Garden magazine in his new book, "Moon Underfoot." I thought it was a fictional magazine. Have to check it out!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SMC1986 wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Douglas,
Yes it is the same person and Pritchard was even mentioned in the latest issue if I remember correctly. I've had a subscription for going on 2 years I think and it is an amazing magazine. Too bad it only comes every other month. At least I have F&S to get me through!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from philbourjaily wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

If I remember correctly, the only dishes on the menu at the Frog and Peach were Frog a la Peach and Peach a la Frog. Thanks for reminding me of that sketch which I hadn't thought about it in years.

G&G is a good magazine, too, with lots to read even for those of us who live far above the Mason Dixon line.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Sales of the above should be limited to zip codes south of the Mason-Dixon and east of the Red River without exception.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

WAM

"...east of the Red River..."

Now I may not be of the genteel nature of a mint julep sippin', white suited Southern Colonel, but my paternal grandmother was a magnolia blossom of Mobile society before trekking to East Texas to spread charm sweet as Tupelo honey and my maternal grandfather was a Tarheel of the finest sort.
Even THEY both knew the Red (Rio Rojo to use the local vernacular!) River springs to life from a gouge in the high Texas plains know as Palo Dura Canyon and eventually spills it's silt-laden life blood (it's too thick to drink and too thin to plow!) into the Mighty Mississippi near the Atchafalaya Basin!
There may be some southerly flow to it's meanderings and geographers mau consider it's flow "north to south".
But by Gawd Almighty's blessing, it flows WEST to EAST!
NORTH of the Red is Sooners!
SOUTH of the Red is Texicans!
There AIN'T no "...east of the Ref River..."!. Not the "Suthun" Red anyway!
It is my sincerest hope thay you might pass this information on to your fellow UA alumni!

Deepest Regards

FirstBubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Them poor misguided Texas boys what have unseemly "Yankee" leanings travel to Norman, Okla to play football at that scurrilous outfit, OU!
They dubbed their school OU, but call it the University of Oklahoma.
Do the have dyslexia?
If it's "OU", shouldn't they call it "Oklahoma University"?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Oh, snap...no he din'nt.

Actually Mtnhunter, I've never been south of the M-D line, but I used to watch "The Andy Griffeth Show." You guys are good people.

PS: I am typing this slowly, because I know y'all can't read real fast.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Mr. McClure

My great uncle died at the age of 98 in 1973.
He came to east Texas from North Carolina by steam boat to Houston, Texas where he was greeted by mud streets and a tent city. He then traveled by steam packet up the Trinity River to Magnolia Ferry where he was "whisked" into Palestine, Texas by horse drawn carriage. There he found boardwalks, opera houses and the locomotive foundry of the I&GN Railroad.
When his sainted wife turned 80 years of age, he finally gave up on the idea that "ain't nobody gonna shπ inside my house" and had an indoor toilet installed for "her" convenience!
Don't tell ME Southern folk ain't "stylish"!
BTW!
Uncle Morris never had a drivers license and worked his farm horse back or a WWII jeep. At age 96, the Jeep died and he bought another horse. A gentleman in the community, knowing Uncle Morris did not have a license, was hauling his horse home for him.
Jokingly he asked, "Uncle Morris. How old do you think a man should be when he quits messing with women?"
Sitting sapling tall and straight he answered, "Boy, give me a good clean woman and I can father a child quick as you can!"

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

From what I have experienced Texas has 5 very distinctive "states" or unique regions, coastal Texas, North Texas, West Texas, East Texas, and Austin. Anyone care to expound on this observation?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

WAM

"...east of the Red River..."

Now I may not be of the genteel nature of a mint julep sippin', white suited Southern Colonel, but my paternal grandmother was a magnolia blossom of Mobile society before trekking to East Texas to spread charm sweet as Tupelo honey and my maternal grandfather was a Tarheel of the finest sort.
Even THEY both knew the Red (Rio Rojo to use the local vernacular!) River springs to life from a gouge in the high Texas plains know as Palo Dura Canyon and eventually spills it's silt-laden life blood (it's too thick to drink and too thin to plow!) into the Mighty Mississippi near the Atchafalaya Basin!
There may be some southerly flow to it's meanderings and geographers mau consider it's flow "north to south".
But by Gawd Almighty's blessing, it flows WEST to EAST!
NORTH of the Red is Sooners!
SOUTH of the Red is Texicans!
There AIN'T no "...east of the Ref River..."!. Not the "Suthun" Red anyway!
It is my sincerest hope thay you might pass this information on to your fellow UA alumni!

Deepest Regards

FirstBubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

WAM

"...east of the Red River..."

Now I may not be of the genteel nature of a mint julep sippin', white suited Southern Colonel, but my paternal grandmother was a magnolia blossom of Mobile society before trekking to East Texas to spread charm sweet as Tupelo honey and my maternal grandfather was a Tarheel of the finest sort.
Even THEY both knew the Red (Rio Rojo to use the local vernacular!) River springs to life from a gouge in the high Texas plains know as Palo Dura Canyon and eventually spills it's silt-laden life blood (it's too thick to drink and too thin to plow!) into the Mighty Mississippi near the Atchafalaya Basin!
There may be some southerly flow to it's meanderings and geographers mau consider it's flow "north to south".
But by Gawd Almighty's blessing, it flows WEST to EAST!
NORTH of the Red is Sooners!
SOUTH of the Red is Texicans!
There AIN'T no "...east of the Ref River..."!. Not the "Suthun" Red anyway!
It is my sincerest hope thay you might pass this information on to your fellow UA alumni!

Deepest Regards

FirstBubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

Texans ain't Southerners, neither are Sooners. Pshaw, close but no cigar. By some skulduggery, two of those non-southern teams were sneaked into the SEC. Only southern states west of the Mississippi are Arkansas (maybe) an Louisiana ( for sure). Having lots of trailer parks and rednecks does not make you Southern by definition.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 11 weeks 3 days ago

If Texans ain't "Southern", gravy don't go on biscuits!
Sooners?
Scourge of the earth!
We had are own "conference"! The SWC! Sadly, they didn't ask me!
I've swilled my share of chicory.
WAM - all in jest, amigo!

Tim Platt
Ever hear if "Northern" cooking? LOL!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

Bubba - all in good fun for sure! American by birth, Southern by the grace of God! :-)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

Bubba, Northerners tend to over cook things, Atlanta, Shiloh, New Orleans...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 1uglymutha wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

A genteel southern belle once informed me that a "Yankee" is defined as anyone who lives north of Interstate 10.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from The_UTP wrote 11 weeks 2 days ago

I'd love to read this book! I grew up in Missouri, parts of which desperately yearn to be Southern but are most decidedly not, even if they had a pretty good run this year in the SEC. I dated one true Southern Belle when I was in college, and that was when I found out that I know nothing, nothing at all about real Southern culture.

Interestingly, I think you could make a case that, depending on whom you count as Southern and which era you want discuss, the South has produced the best truly American literature. (Of course I'm still claiming America's finest writer, Mark Twain, for Missouri.) The South's also where the blues come from, which means it's where jazz, rock and roll, hip hop and R&B all come from.

One of the saddest side-effects of modern mass media is the way in which it's erasing regional accents. Being a Missouri boy, I can tell a high-class Georgian from a Missouri hillbilly from a Red Dirt Okie from a drawling Texan. I love all those accents, but they're disappearing into one New York-California mishmash.

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from Dallas A. McWhorter wrote 11 weeks 1 day ago

Despite the fact that where I was raised and reside in Texas is south of every other state except Florida, I don not and never will identify as a southerner. I am a Texan or a southwesterner. And Drew, in my opinion there are generally six different parts to Texas; South Texas, Central Texas, West Texas, North Texas, East Texas (which, despite what WAM says, is part of the south), and The Texas Hill Country, which is in both South and Central Texas. I should know, after all, I was born and raised in Texas, my family was part of the Old 300, 1 (and if letters from his family to the Texas Government are to be believed 2) of my ancestors (he was an uncle) fought and died at the Alamo, my ancestor's (the same one who died at the Alamo) oxen were uses to haul The Come And Take It Cannon, another ancestor (also an uncle) was in a small party that avoided being captcherd at Goliad and was across the river when Fanin and his men were massacred so he probably watched the massacre happen, and one if my grandfathers fought at the first battle at Goliad and signed the Goliad Declaration of Independence.

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from Dallas A. McWhorter wrote 11 weeks 1 day ago

Despite the fact that where I was raised and reside in Texas is south of every other state except Florida, I don not and never will identify as a southerner. I am a Texan or a southwesterner. And Drew, in my opinion there are generally six different parts to Texas; South Texas, Central Texas, West Texas, North Texas, East Texas (which, despite what WAM says, is, unfortunantly, part of the south), and The Texas Hill Country, which is in both South and Central Texas. I should know, after all, I was born and raised in Texas, my family first came to Texas as part of the Old 300, 1 (and if letters from his family to the Texas Government are to be believed 2) of my ancestors (he was an uncle) fought and died at the Alamo, my ancestor's (the same one who died at the Alamo) oxen were uses to haul The Come And Take It Cannon, another ancestor (also an uncle) was in a small party that avoided being captcherd at Goliad and was across the river when Fanin and his men were massacred so he probably watched the massacre happen, and one if my grandfathers fought at the first battle at Goliad and signed the Goliad Declaration of Independence. I guess you could I'm, I don't know, a Texan by Nature maybe?

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from Dallas A. McWhorter wrote 11 weeks 1 day ago

Correction-...could say...

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from Shellcracker wrote 11 weeks 18 hours ago

Geographic lines are comical to me. There are guys in New York City that can out fish, hunt or trap guys from Alaska. There are people in the heart of Mississippi that drive a Mercedes Benz and have never heard of a deer drag or baited a hook. What state you live in does not speak for who you are as a person, a hunter, a fisher or an outdoorsman. I find myself more at home swapping hunting and fishing stories with people I have met from the Dakotas, Illinois or Pennsylvania than some people in the southern state I live in. You mean to tell me that if you drive 1 mile from Indiana to Kentucky that it is now acceptable to drink mint juleps and watch horse racing or that because your great great great grandpappy charged up the hill with General Beauregard that you can't drink a boilermaker or eat a Philly cheesesteak? I think 99% of us don't fall into the category of believing those things. I find however that most of the time, people that talk about the South the loudest and with the most bragadoccio, are the 1% of aristocracy that want to portray themselves as some sort of 1850s plantation owner and romanticize it and make quips about the north or northerners etc. The rest of us are pretty laid back. Every part of every state is different from the rest and every person from every part is different from the other. All that ranting aside, I do buy the aformentioned magazine on occasion and enjoy it, especially the pictures of the dressed up lady folk, expensive shotguns I will never be able to afford, articles on conservation and highlights of various alcoholic spirits and food. You just have to remember not to take yourself too seriously.

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from Hassan Abdul-Wahid wrote 10 weeks 5 days ago

My parents, who have lived in Savannah, GA for the last twenty years, just got me a subscription to G&G. I get the distinct feeling I'm the only one in Los Angeles with a subscription to this fine magazine. I'm an LA native but every time I receive an issue I get the feeling that I should move to the South.

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from FSU70 wrote 9 weeks 3 days ago

Anyone from Texas who says they aren't southern doesn't know their own history. Considering Texas was settled by southerners from Tennessee, Kentucky with some Gawjah folks thrown in. That being said, I've been an off and on subscriber of Garden & Guns for a number of years. They are southern and they write well of the charms of the south and it's history and culture. However they are mostly made up of "Liberal" southern writers and that has a tendency to turn me off. They are of the "Charleston " southern elite and piss me off from time to time. But then they come up with a good article by Rick Bragg of Alabama or Georgia Wallace or some great pictures of southern dogs and I get reeled in again. So for me it is a love, not hate but dislike relationship. But all in all more Southern than Southern Living Magazine.

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from FSU70 wrote 9 weeks 3 days ago

P.S. the Sainted Sam Houston was born in Virginia and fought in the battle of Horse Shoe Bend with Andy Jackson down in Alabama long before he came to Texas !

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