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August 03, 2009

High Tech Bow Building

By Scott Bestul

There’s little doubt that modern compounds are the most efficient shooters ever produced. But just how do they manufacture the thousands of bows demanded by hunters and shooters every year? The video below gives a peek at the process from the Bow Tech factory, and I found it highly entertaining.

Obviously there are no big trade secrets divulged here. You won’t learn the exact materials of Bow Tech limbs or how cams are designed, but many of the processes used by the company to produce hundreds of bows in a single day are shown. As a guy who has trouble whittling a toothpick from a willow stick, I was wowed by the process.

My cousin is a bowyer who makes recurve bows that are as deadly in the woods as they are gorgeous. A few years back, Mark guided me as I rebuilt a set of limbs for a take-down recurve I own. It was an exhaustive, time-intensive, and ultimately satisfying process that heightened my respect for folks who can transform a block of wood into an awesome hunting tool. The machinery used to produce Bow Tech compounds is even more complex and, in my mind, equally impressive. Hope you enjoy the show!

Comments (12)

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from ingebrigtsen wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

True modern engineering isnt what the ford company invented with the assembly line, its making the best possible product with available technology.. imagine cars and motorbikes that last 20-30 years and houses that lasts hundreds of years.. the price theire going for right now would seem fair if they lasted that long.. Its time to evolve.. not just consume.. the enviromental impact of a car lasting 30 years wouldnt seem that bad considering, compared to current massproduced products that are outdated after 2 years.. Quality not quantity would make the american car manufacturing industry thrive in a economically uncertain time. not go out of buisness..
peace out..

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Neat. Bowtech have always been good bows.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hjohn429 wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Cool, now I know wxactly how MY bow was made.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I noticed to test for speed, with the chronograph, the arrow didn't have fletching. But,to test for accuracy it appeared they had Blazer fletching on the arrow.

That was a neat behind-the-scene video!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from NYhunter wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

It was a good video, I wish I had one of those bows!!!! Some day I will!!!!!!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jsobrien wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Who would of thunk it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FloridaHunter1226 wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Neat video... of course you see that the bow was shot at a 70# draw weight to reach that 300 fps.... so really if you shoot less than that weight, your not going to get the same velocity. So all that advertising is nonsense... make sure to read between the lines.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ejunk wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

neat video! the painting bit was especially cool!

yrs-
Evan!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from GiantWhitetails wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

thats awesome

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from stickbow13 wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

and just think back in the day it was just a stick & a piece of leather, look how far we come...very interesting piece

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Don Mitchell wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Awesome tech. love the paint job
Don

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from chadian wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

capture your moment in history with the enduring leagacy of art. www.lavinstudio.com

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jdmoore10 wrote 4 years 36 weeks ago

Really neat video.

FloridaHunter1226-you're right about the reading between the lines and making sure not to see in to the hype. However, if you do shoot a lower draw weight, you can actually shoot a lighter spined, lighter-grain per inch-arrow, which actually will allow for a speed that is very close, if not at the same speed as a higher draw weight.

For example, at 70 pounds and 29" draw length you would have to shoot a 340 spined arrow. If you're shooting 60 pounds and 28" draw length, you would be able to shoot a 400 spined arrow.

The 340, depending on the arrow, would be around 9 grains per inch, while the same arrow, spined at 400 would be closer to 7.5 gpi...this results in a lighter arrow and close-to-equivalent speed! Food for thought! :)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

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from ingebrigtsen wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

True modern engineering isnt what the ford company invented with the assembly line, its making the best possible product with available technology.. imagine cars and motorbikes that last 20-30 years and houses that lasts hundreds of years.. the price theire going for right now would seem fair if they lasted that long.. Its time to evolve.. not just consume.. the enviromental impact of a car lasting 30 years wouldnt seem that bad considering, compared to current massproduced products that are outdated after 2 years.. Quality not quantity would make the american car manufacturing industry thrive in a economically uncertain time. not go out of buisness..
peace out..

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Neat. Bowtech have always been good bows.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hjohn429 wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Cool, now I know wxactly how MY bow was made.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 2Poppa wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

I noticed to test for speed, with the chronograph, the arrow didn't have fletching. But,to test for accuracy it appeared they had Blazer fletching on the arrow.

That was a neat behind-the-scene video!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from NYhunter wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

It was a good video, I wish I had one of those bows!!!! Some day I will!!!!!!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jsobrien wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Who would of thunk it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FloridaHunter1226 wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Neat video... of course you see that the bow was shot at a 70# draw weight to reach that 300 fps.... so really if you shoot less than that weight, your not going to get the same velocity. So all that advertising is nonsense... make sure to read between the lines.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ejunk wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

neat video! the painting bit was especially cool!

yrs-
Evan!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from GiantWhitetails wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

thats awesome

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from stickbow13 wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

and just think back in the day it was just a stick & a piece of leather, look how far we come...very interesting piece

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Don Mitchell wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

Awesome tech. love the paint job
Don

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from chadian wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

capture your moment in history with the enduring leagacy of art. www.lavinstudio.com

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jdmoore10 wrote 4 years 36 weeks ago

Really neat video.

FloridaHunter1226-you're right about the reading between the lines and making sure not to see in to the hype. However, if you do shoot a lower draw weight, you can actually shoot a lighter spined, lighter-grain per inch-arrow, which actually will allow for a speed that is very close, if not at the same speed as a higher draw weight.

For example, at 70 pounds and 29" draw length you would have to shoot a 340 spined arrow. If you're shooting 60 pounds and 28" draw length, you would be able to shoot a 400 spined arrow.

The 340, depending on the arrow, would be around 9 grains per inch, while the same arrow, spined at 400 would be closer to 7.5 gpi...this results in a lighter arrow and close-to-equivalent speed! Food for thought! :)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment