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Bourjaily: Stop New-Shotgun Misfires with Break Free CLP

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November 30, 2009

Bourjaily: Stop New-Shotgun Misfires with Break Free CLP

By Phil Bourjaily

This really is about gun care, but I will begin by digressing:  my 13 ½ year old English setter Ike (pictured here hard at work guarding my hunting clothes last year) went completely blind two weeks ago. When I go pheasant hunting,  Ike still gets to ride in his crate to the field and back. I let him out to wander around sniffing things as I get ready,  then I put Ike back in the box, get Jed out, and that’s the extent of Ike’s “hunt.”

In 12 full seasons Ike had a bunch of pheasants, a few quail, half a dozen woodcock and two Hungarian partridges and a snipe shot over his points. He has been a beloved house pet, too, and now is a blind, beloved house pet.  I have few regrets about his life as my dog.

Here is one regret I do have: last fall, on what turned out to be his last point in the field, my gun misfired and it was my fault. Ike was good for about 20 minutes of hunting a day last year. One morning he pointed the only covey of quail I saw in Iowa all season. It was in a foodplot of standing corn, and I could see the birds on the ground and my dog downwind and locked up, tail held low in that old-timey setter way of his. I stepped into midst of them, the air filled with bobwhites, I picked one, and my new gun went “click.”

What happened?  Guns come from the factory covered in grease, which you have to clean off with a cloth and a spritz of oil. Often, there’s  grease on the firing pins of new guns, too, and it can slow the pins down, resulting in a few light strikes on the primer when the gun is brand new.  The problem cures itself quickly, but if you don’t want to experience it at all, the remedy is simple: a drop of Break Free CLP down the firing pin hole(s) as you’re degreasing your new gun is all it takes. 

Unfortunately this tip falls under the heading of “Do as I say, not as I do,” because I keep forgetting my drop of Break-Free when I clean up a new gun for the first time, and that’s what happened when Ike pointed the quail.

Comments (41)

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from duckcreekdick wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

I just got back from walking my two setters, Petey and young Dan. Wonderful dogs, they are. Give old Ike a pat on the head for me, o.k.?
Having unboxed many a new shotgun during my 12 years in gun sales, I found Brownings, especially the BPS's, overgreased and in need of thorough cleaning before being shot.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jjas wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Good tip on the break free.

I've been reading about different new guns failing to go boom and the owners immediately ship the guns back to the factory for "repair". I wonder how many "repairs" are a squirt of break free?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Phil, thanks for the photo of Ike on the job. You never know when the last hunt will be. I too cherish memories of dogs past and a few what if's... Thanks for the reminders...

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Last year on the last day of the season, a friend of mine's 11 year old Labrador "Rocky" beat my 2 year old to a downed goose and brought it right to me, but would not release it! Then he trotted over to my friend and deposited the goose at his feet. that turned out to be the last goose Rocky ever retrieved (or stole!). He died of heart failure 2 days later. He was a great old dog that taught my pup most of what he knows. When other guys ask where old Rocky is (not knowing he died), I point to my dog and say, "Right over there".

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from mcdlacrosse9 wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

That's a shame, but its a testament to the importance of gun care. Either way, I can't imagine this at all made your time with your dog any less pleasant.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from hfedder40 wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

poor dog my uncle had a dog and he went blind on there aniversary

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from hfedder40 wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

poor dog my uncle had a dog and he went blind on there aniversary

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Sorry to hear about your dog, my wife has a Lhasa Apso that is 17, still getting around pretty well but slowing don enough to make us worry.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

The Military has been using Break Free for about 30 years!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

A good blast of Remington shotgun cleaner followed by a blast of Break Free keeps my old pump gun going bang every time it's supposed to! Crud buildup in the bolt can cause the firing pin to stick or prevent full forward travel. Break Free definitely keeps things moving, although I'm not sure how good it is for wood.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

I'm glad Ike has a good home -- where in his younger years he was able to excell at what he was created for and in his "retirement" years he is still honored and appreciated.

About grease -- I grew up using Hoppe's Gun Grease as the final touch in all firearms detailing. It was a common and ancient part of the cleaning system. I have taken apart guns that have passed the century mark and been stuck in a widow's attic and found dried caked on gun grease around even the most intricate of internal parts.

When I moved to the Pacific Northwest 20 years ago, there was no gun grease in the sporting goods stores. Clerks looked at me with a cocked eyebrow when I asked for it... I asked a gunsmith acquaintance and he said he'd heard of "old timers using it, but nobody uses that stuff these days..." So, I got familiar with GunScrubber and RemOil.

This year, with 3 of my kids hunting, we would have 6+ guns to keep oiled in the Northwest rains -- that was a total hassle. And I started thinking of gun grease again... Did an online search and found several new brands. I settled on Montana X-treme "Rugged as the Rockies". It is absolutely GLORIOUS! A coating over the metal and the rain just beads up and runs off! And it stays put -- no need for another coat everytime I get back to the truck or back to camp!

Try it, you'll like it!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Carney, coat that gun with Ultragunshield and it will be protected without the mess of having grease on everything.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Sounds like Ile is a great old dog. We hope to have many good memories with my GSH pointer Jill before it's all over. She is not yet 2 and already doing great things with birds.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Del = I'll check it out! Anything that makes protecting firearms in the rain a little easier -- I'm all for it!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Carney, Ultracoatings makes some wonderful stuff. Del and I got to tour thier facility while I was out there for the pheasant opener. Really nice folks too!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Just Looked a Ultra Coatings' web site -- looks like it will be an "over the winter" kind of project!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Cosmoline, don't you just love the stuff!

When I get a new gun, especially a Military Rifle that has been packed in Cosmoline, I remove the stock and soak the barrel and action in Coleman Fuel. With Military Rifles really packed, I may resort to gasoline and once all the Cosmoline is dissolved, a good healthy dose of Coleman Fuel to remove any residue remaining. Whats so great about Coleman Fuel it preps the metal for good oil penetration and adhesion.

Also carburetor cleaner followed by brake cleaner and final rinse in Coleman Fuel is the norm for cleaning. Just be sure to remove the stock and all the plastic parts prior to doing this. Stocks, plastics and especially recoil pads have a really bad allergic reaction to this stuff, they melt and melt and melt and keep on melting!

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Bourjaily

For Ike,

I'm lost for words, been there and done that.

On Riffraffs final day to where he was to be buried I placed him on back of my ATV where he rode for a many years loving every moment of it and I slowly drove the long way to his Burial spot, call it his final ride.

Riffraff passed away at 14 1/2, a German Shorthair Pointer the size of a Irish Setter. Born in Alaska, we Grouse hunted and hunted qual and doves in Arizona. I remember that day when he was a pup, he rode in a milk crate on the front of my ATV. When I stopped he bailed out sniffing the ground and the next thing I knew, he was rubbing noses with a Moose Calf and boy did the Mother put him in warp drive running back to me!

Bourjaily Sir,

This tear is for you and for Ike!

Not easy

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from coho310 wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Sorry to here about that, but that's what happens when dogs get old.Ike's gonna be okay, that ol' boy's far from handicapped.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

SS3 You're back!! I'm so happy!

We all discussed it and came to the conclusion that you must be no other than Mrs. David Petzal! Just getting back at the old geezer for publishing photos of young, scantily clad babes...

I'd be mad too. But by way of encouragement I want you to know that menopause lasts only "so long". Even though you are enduring "hot flash hell", it will be over in only a few years and then you can get on with the rest of your life.

Best to ya!

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Putting down your bird dog sucks;
Mine was "Dutchess" a German shorthair pointer that was my hunting partner for 10 years.
It is very important to clean the mechanism of the firearm even if it is new! I think many of us fail to get that detailed when cleaning a firearm, and in your case it left unhappy memories with Ike.
Ah, *hit happens!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from straightshooter wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

A buddy of mine has a masters degree in chemistry and is also the biggest "gun nut" that I know. He researches everything before purchasing and putting it on his guns. Break Free CLP is the only oil he uses on his firearms. And if you have an hour or two, he can give you all his reasons, in detail.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from green pond mike wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

I have had several good hunting dogs in my lifetime but the two that stood out the most were both named "spot". Spot#1 was only 3 months old when if he got a whiff of a scent he'd raise up on his hind legs and go in an circle until he could determine which way it was comming from and then he was off--plowing into or running over any dog in his way. He liked hunting so much that he and my hound would go without me. I had to cross some railroad tracks 175 yards in front of my house to get to where I hunted and they'd take the same route. I guess spot had his nose to the ground and didn't see the amtrack. Spot#2 was born 7 years later and he was also a go-getter,but what stood out the most about him was that he could climb and jump. I couldn't keep him fenced up--he'd go over the fence. He would either climb a regular fence or jump a smaller one gracefully like a deer. He slept on the roof of my car or my 65 chevy pickup. He even climbed an apple tree that branched out a foot from the ground to get to a squirrel. He had a chance to fully mature before he too met his fate down on those tracks. I was out in the yard one day when I heard 3 shotgun blasts and was almost sure what had happened. Somehow GOD restrained me from going right then and checking--probably kept me from doing life in prison. A few days later when spot,my hound and a lab that ran with them didn't show up,I went a-looking. I found spot,shot near the track,but didn't find the other two. If I ever get another hunting dog I won't be naming him "spot" and he will not be introduced to the tracks. As for that break free CLP,I might just try that. I've been using rem-oil up till now and before that I used wd-40. Cleaning any gun is work and the solvants that smell the worse works the best. The hardest part is getting started,but in the end when you're putting on that final protectant coating,you feel rewarded knowing that you mantained your investment. A well maintained gun is like money in the bank--they hold their value well.

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from nc30-06 wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Sorry to hear Ike has gone blind. He still has a good home and his memories of you and the hunts, as you do of him.
Mine was Grits, who I had to put down five years ago, December the third. It was one of the hardest days I have had. Still brings tears.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from sarg wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Sounds like IKE has served you well, Atrue and faithful friend. Yes BREAKFREE will cure the problem.. while in the service, we always used BREAK FREE to clean and preserve our M-16's and M-60's. I still use it today at home... The best thing to apply Breakfree to your firearms is and old sofe bristle brush like an old shaving brush.Just tip the brush in a little Breakfree and apply. the brush will get the Break Free in places a cloth will not reach. My Brother in Lwa has a Fox Double and every season, I would have to take it down and clean it or it would missfire... This post sure brings a lot of memories even IKE, I had an English pointer name LADY. Good friend and companion...Miss her dearly...(Sniff-Sniff). Good post Dave.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Randy S. Breth wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

I like Ike. It's sad seeing them get old, but at least you know you did the best you could for them...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from elmer f. wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

well, as regrets go, i wouldnt worry to much about that one. old dogs are more forgiving that your own mother. good, old, dogs, that have been family pets as well, know you better than you will ever know yourself. and believe me, he understood your frustration the moment it happened, and harbors no hard fellings towards you at all for it. he may not have understood what happened, but you, and your emotions are what he understands. the hard part, for both of you, is going to be when he has to leave you for the great hunting grounds in the sky. the time will be short, enjoy what you both have left.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from JD wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

bs3, you are about as smooth as a burdock. Do you have a dog in your miserable life? If so I can only hope that you share great memories of your time together. It is good to know that dog would have a purpose in life, to teach you real values and decency, since he would appear to be the brains of your group. If you only knew who your daddy was maybe he could have provided you with those qualities, since you seem to be deeply in need. Why not write back in say, 20 years when you grow up and become a man? Enjoy your smug self as you seem to be a lonely miserable individual w/o any friends. Oh yes, have a nice day!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Picture of Ike is really heart wrenching but just reminded me of something of him laying on the hunting vest/coat.

If you ever get separated form your dog, lay your coat down at the last known location if you have to leave the area. Chances are, when you come back to retrieve your coat you will find your buddy laying on it to!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from green pond mike wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

I don't know for sure,but Ike may still give you that last bird.I know he is old and has lost his eyesight,but if everything else is still working alright he might be able to use his senses to point one.Dogs seem to adapt to their circumstances just as well or better then humans.Check out that video on youtube about the dog that was born without front legs--he walks upright like we do and he does it very well.HE even has better balance than some people do.Just hunt him in a good wide open field where he won't hurt himself and be patient.He might even fetch it!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Winchester 92 wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

That break free stuff is great i tried some it practically cleans your gun for you try it out. Give Ike a big ole milk bone for me and best of wishes to you

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from sarg wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Dave, sorry about the last post, I give you credit for a good post when it wasn't yours, but still a good post...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from sarg wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Del, Glad you can still find birds, They are all but gone here,(not because of my shooting) but still a few grouse...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Clay

That is good advice. Most 'lost' dogs will find their way back to the last place you separated from them by backtracking after they tire of chasing whatever they were after. Reminds me of how we came by the dachshund we currently have. Some 8 years ago, we had the retrievers boarded in January and upon our return, the kennel owner was way out in the raspberry fields looking for a lost dog she took in as part of her rescue operation. She said it was a black and tan mini dachshund that had "escaped" and would not come back. We told her if she got it back, give us a call. I told my wife on the way home not to call and ask about the dog as it would be highly unlikely that if he survived the freezing nights, that he would evade the many coyotes in the area.

Two days later, we got a call that the dachshund had been recovered by putting his old blanket under an old picnic table over on the abandoned farmstead where he was last seen. She went over there very early that morning and there he was, shivering under his blanket.

I think I know how he survived the coyotes. He is the meanest darn dog that I have ever owned. The first week home he attacked both my retrievers and split their noses. There are probably some skinned-up coyotes out there somewhere. His dog/people bite count hovers at 17. At sixteen years old, he is not quite as bad as he once was. He hasn't bitten anyone but my Lab in 2 years....

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JD wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

WA Mtnhunter,

Good that old dachshund has settled down, they surely have a mean streak a mile wide. But at his age, 16, 112 in people years he is due to settle down some. They tend to bite less when it hurts those old teeth more than the intended target!

Phil, I am so sorry about your Ike, just keep taking him for some long walks on some country trails if he stays nearby your side.

All, sorry I unloaded on old ss3 so hard,just had enough of the child's intrusions.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mock1 wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Sorry about Ike. i've got a 8 year old Black Lab named Elway. Two mos ago he started limping really badly. I was worried about his hips and finally took him to the vet fearing the worst. The vet looked at him and said that he thinks he just sprained something. He's fine now but alot of grey on his muzzle. Since that scare, I've taken him hunting for everything but deer. Last mon my freind whacked a Bufflehead in a pretty nasty swampy area. Would have took 40 mins to wade thru the muck to get it. Elway got it in 40m seconds. Next shot I shoot a bluebill about 30 yards out over lake Erie. Elway daintily climbed down huge rocks, jumped in the lake, get the duck in about amin. He comes over to me, sits down and drops the duck at my feet. Yesterday my friend came home w/ a brand spanking 6 week old lab. He said he couldn't live w/o one after seeing Elway work. I hope he never dies although I know it's gonna happen. I don't know how I'll face that day

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Zermoid wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Clay,
Doxies (Dachshund) were originally bred to "go to ground", ie. follow a rat, badger, etc. into it's burrow, kill it and bring it back to it's owner. And seeing your post I am assuming it's a smooth coat, as Black & Tan isn't a wirehaired color and Longhair Doxies usually are much more "mellow" than the other Miniature Doxie types!
Wanna have some fun? Get a Red Miniature Longhaired Doxie and put him in with a litter of Irish Setter pups, everyone looks at them and ask "What's wrong with that one pup?"!

I'm glad to see I'm not the only person who likes Break-Free! I've had "Gun Experts" at a large local gun shop tell me to not use it, that it is worthless junk and that I should use XXXXXXXXXXXX that costs 4x the price because if I don't all my guns will disintegrate into a pile of dust, or something just as ridiculous. (Honestly I pretty much quit listening when they dissed my Break-Free!)
I've been using it for about 15 years now, works great, apply it and let it sit overnight, give it another coat and let that soak in as well. Any metal covered like that will be almost impervious to rust for about a year.
It also has almost completely replaced my solvents, cleans and oils the bore all at once. Only use solvents on EXTREMELY fouled bores and parts, Break-Free cleans most minor crud buildups, only exception is if I fire some corrosive Mil Surplus ammo. That get's a Corrosive Ammo Neutralized cleaning followed by Break-Free.

And personally the first thing I do with a new (or used and new to me) gun is take it completely apart and clean out all the grease, gunk and grime (I don't think any of the local gun shops disassemble and/or clean used guns!) and wipe it down with Break-Free, all parts get twice coated with Break-Free and then re-assembled.
It works for me!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hunting022 wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Sorry to hear about Ike. I know how hard it is to see a dog with health problems like that. I had to put my English Springer down at age 22 when she was diagnosed
with cancer. She was outperforming 2 and 3 year old at 13. As for the guns, yea I have done the same thing. New Ruger Red Label on pheasant. Not a good thing in front of a hunting guide.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Please note, if you use Break Free like I have for High Power Rifle Competition in the bore to reduce the copper fouling, be sure to fire 3 rounds. The first round will be high and the 3rd should be dead on!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

That 4th Generation 4 Runner above looks like a City Boys Car!

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from Jere Smith wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Update on my Lhasa she died at 17 1/2.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Last year on the last day of the season, a friend of mine's 11 year old Labrador "Rocky" beat my 2 year old to a downed goose and brought it right to me, but would not release it! Then he trotted over to my friend and deposited the goose at his feet. that turned out to be the last goose Rocky ever retrieved (or stole!). He died of heart failure 2 days later. He was a great old dog that taught my pup most of what he knows. When other guys ask where old Rocky is (not knowing he died), I point to my dog and say, "Right over there".

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Bourjaily

For Ike,

I'm lost for words, been there and done that.

On Riffraffs final day to where he was to be buried I placed him on back of my ATV where he rode for a many years loving every moment of it and I slowly drove the long way to his Burial spot, call it his final ride.

Riffraff passed away at 14 1/2, a German Shorthair Pointer the size of a Irish Setter. Born in Alaska, we Grouse hunted and hunted qual and doves in Arizona. I remember that day when he was a pup, he rode in a milk crate on the front of my ATV. When I stopped he bailed out sniffing the ground and the next thing I knew, he was rubbing noses with a Moose Calf and boy did the Mother put him in warp drive running back to me!

Bourjaily Sir,

This tear is for you and for Ike!

Not easy

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Sounds like Ile is a great old dog. We hope to have many good memories with my GSH pointer Jill before it's all over. She is not yet 2 and already doing great things with birds.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Cosmoline, don't you just love the stuff!

When I get a new gun, especially a Military Rifle that has been packed in Cosmoline, I remove the stock and soak the barrel and action in Coleman Fuel. With Military Rifles really packed, I may resort to gasoline and once all the Cosmoline is dissolved, a good healthy dose of Coleman Fuel to remove any residue remaining. Whats so great about Coleman Fuel it preps the metal for good oil penetration and adhesion.

Also carburetor cleaner followed by brake cleaner and final rinse in Coleman Fuel is the norm for cleaning. Just be sure to remove the stock and all the plastic parts prior to doing this. Stocks, plastics and especially recoil pads have a really bad allergic reaction to this stuff, they melt and melt and melt and keep on melting!

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

SS3 You're back!! I'm so happy!

We all discussed it and came to the conclusion that you must be no other than Mrs. David Petzal! Just getting back at the old geezer for publishing photos of young, scantily clad babes...

I'd be mad too. But by way of encouragement I want you to know that menopause lasts only "so long". Even though you are enduring "hot flash hell", it will be over in only a few years and then you can get on with the rest of your life.

Best to ya!

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Phil, thanks for the photo of Ike on the job. You never know when the last hunt will be. I too cherish memories of dogs past and a few what if's... Thanks for the reminders...

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

A good blast of Remington shotgun cleaner followed by a blast of Break Free keeps my old pump gun going bang every time it's supposed to! Crud buildup in the bolt can cause the firing pin to stick or prevent full forward travel. Break Free definitely keeps things moving, although I'm not sure how good it is for wood.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

I'm glad Ike has a good home -- where in his younger years he was able to excell at what he was created for and in his "retirement" years he is still honored and appreciated.

About grease -- I grew up using Hoppe's Gun Grease as the final touch in all firearms detailing. It was a common and ancient part of the cleaning system. I have taken apart guns that have passed the century mark and been stuck in a widow's attic and found dried caked on gun grease around even the most intricate of internal parts.

When I moved to the Pacific Northwest 20 years ago, there was no gun grease in the sporting goods stores. Clerks looked at me with a cocked eyebrow when I asked for it... I asked a gunsmith acquaintance and he said he'd heard of "old timers using it, but nobody uses that stuff these days..." So, I got familiar with GunScrubber and RemOil.

This year, with 3 of my kids hunting, we would have 6+ guns to keep oiled in the Northwest rains -- that was a total hassle. And I started thinking of gun grease again... Did an online search and found several new brands. I settled on Montana X-treme "Rugged as the Rockies". It is absolutely GLORIOUS! A coating over the metal and the rain just beads up and runs off! And it stays put -- no need for another coat everytime I get back to the truck or back to camp!

Try it, you'll like it!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Carney, coat that gun with Ultragunshield and it will be protected without the mess of having grease on everything.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Del = I'll check it out! Anything that makes protecting firearms in the rain a little easier -- I'm all for it!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Carney, Ultracoatings makes some wonderful stuff. Del and I got to tour thier facility while I was out there for the pheasant opener. Really nice folks too!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Just Looked a Ultra Coatings' web site -- looks like it will be an "over the winter" kind of project!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Putting down your bird dog sucks;
Mine was "Dutchess" a German shorthair pointer that was my hunting partner for 10 years.
It is very important to clean the mechanism of the firearm even if it is new! I think many of us fail to get that detailed when cleaning a firearm, and in your case it left unhappy memories with Ike.
Ah, *hit happens!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from straightshooter wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

A buddy of mine has a masters degree in chemistry and is also the biggest "gun nut" that I know. He researches everything before purchasing and putting it on his guns. Break Free CLP is the only oil he uses on his firearms. And if you have an hour or two, he can give you all his reasons, in detail.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from elmer f. wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

well, as regrets go, i wouldnt worry to much about that one. old dogs are more forgiving that your own mother. good, old, dogs, that have been family pets as well, know you better than you will ever know yourself. and believe me, he understood your frustration the moment it happened, and harbors no hard fellings towards you at all for it. he may not have understood what happened, but you, and your emotions are what he understands. the hard part, for both of you, is going to be when he has to leave you for the great hunting grounds in the sky. the time will be short, enjoy what you both have left.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from JD wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

bs3, you are about as smooth as a burdock. Do you have a dog in your miserable life? If so I can only hope that you share great memories of your time together. It is good to know that dog would have a purpose in life, to teach you real values and decency, since he would appear to be the brains of your group. If you only knew who your daddy was maybe he could have provided you with those qualities, since you seem to be deeply in need. Why not write back in say, 20 years when you grow up and become a man? Enjoy your smug self as you seem to be a lonely miserable individual w/o any friends. Oh yes, have a nice day!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Picture of Ike is really heart wrenching but just reminded me of something of him laying on the hunting vest/coat.

If you ever get separated form your dog, lay your coat down at the last known location if you have to leave the area. Chances are, when you come back to retrieve your coat you will find your buddy laying on it to!

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from Winchester 92 wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

That break free stuff is great i tried some it practically cleans your gun for you try it out. Give Ike a big ole milk bone for me and best of wishes to you

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from duckcreekdick wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

I just got back from walking my two setters, Petey and young Dan. Wonderful dogs, they are. Give old Ike a pat on the head for me, o.k.?
Having unboxed many a new shotgun during my 12 years in gun sales, I found Brownings, especially the BPS's, overgreased and in need of thorough cleaning before being shot.

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from jjas wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Good tip on the break free.

I've been reading about different new guns failing to go boom and the owners immediately ship the guns back to the factory for "repair". I wonder how many "repairs" are a squirt of break free?

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from mcdlacrosse9 wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

That's a shame, but its a testament to the importance of gun care. Either way, I can't imagine this at all made your time with your dog any less pleasant.

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from hfedder40 wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

poor dog my uncle had a dog and he went blind on there aniversary

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from hfedder40 wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

poor dog my uncle had a dog and he went blind on there aniversary

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from coho310 wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Sorry to here about that, but that's what happens when dogs get old.Ike's gonna be okay, that ol' boy's far from handicapped.

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from green pond mike wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

I have had several good hunting dogs in my lifetime but the two that stood out the most were both named "spot". Spot#1 was only 3 months old when if he got a whiff of a scent he'd raise up on his hind legs and go in an circle until he could determine which way it was comming from and then he was off--plowing into or running over any dog in his way. He liked hunting so much that he and my hound would go without me. I had to cross some railroad tracks 175 yards in front of my house to get to where I hunted and they'd take the same route. I guess spot had his nose to the ground and didn't see the amtrack. Spot#2 was born 7 years later and he was also a go-getter,but what stood out the most about him was that he could climb and jump. I couldn't keep him fenced up--he'd go over the fence. He would either climb a regular fence or jump a smaller one gracefully like a deer. He slept on the roof of my car or my 65 chevy pickup. He even climbed an apple tree that branched out a foot from the ground to get to a squirrel. He had a chance to fully mature before he too met his fate down on those tracks. I was out in the yard one day when I heard 3 shotgun blasts and was almost sure what had happened. Somehow GOD restrained me from going right then and checking--probably kept me from doing life in prison. A few days later when spot,my hound and a lab that ran with them didn't show up,I went a-looking. I found spot,shot near the track,but didn't find the other two. If I ever get another hunting dog I won't be naming him "spot" and he will not be introduced to the tracks. As for that break free CLP,I might just try that. I've been using rem-oil up till now and before that I used wd-40. Cleaning any gun is work and the solvants that smell the worse works the best. The hardest part is getting started,but in the end when you're putting on that final protectant coating,you feel rewarded knowing that you mantained your investment. A well maintained gun is like money in the bank--they hold their value well.

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from nc30-06 wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Sorry to hear Ike has gone blind. He still has a good home and his memories of you and the hunts, as you do of him.
Mine was Grits, who I had to put down five years ago, December the third. It was one of the hardest days I have had. Still brings tears.

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from sarg wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Sounds like IKE has served you well, Atrue and faithful friend. Yes BREAKFREE will cure the problem.. while in the service, we always used BREAK FREE to clean and preserve our M-16's and M-60's. I still use it today at home... The best thing to apply Breakfree to your firearms is and old sofe bristle brush like an old shaving brush.Just tip the brush in a little Breakfree and apply. the brush will get the Break Free in places a cloth will not reach. My Brother in Lwa has a Fox Double and every season, I would have to take it down and clean it or it would missfire... This post sure brings a lot of memories even IKE, I had an English pointer name LADY. Good friend and companion...Miss her dearly...(Sniff-Sniff). Good post Dave.

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from Randy S. Breth wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

I like Ike. It's sad seeing them get old, but at least you know you did the best you could for them...

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from green pond mike wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

I don't know for sure,but Ike may still give you that last bird.I know he is old and has lost his eyesight,but if everything else is still working alright he might be able to use his senses to point one.Dogs seem to adapt to their circumstances just as well or better then humans.Check out that video on youtube about the dog that was born without front legs--he walks upright like we do and he does it very well.HE even has better balance than some people do.Just hunt him in a good wide open field where he won't hurt himself and be patient.He might even fetch it!

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from sarg wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Dave, sorry about the last post, I give you credit for a good post when it wasn't yours, but still a good post...

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from sarg wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Del, Glad you can still find birds, They are all but gone here,(not because of my shooting) but still a few grouse...

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Clay

That is good advice. Most 'lost' dogs will find their way back to the last place you separated from them by backtracking after they tire of chasing whatever they were after. Reminds me of how we came by the dachshund we currently have. Some 8 years ago, we had the retrievers boarded in January and upon our return, the kennel owner was way out in the raspberry fields looking for a lost dog she took in as part of her rescue operation. She said it was a black and tan mini dachshund that had "escaped" and would not come back. We told her if she got it back, give us a call. I told my wife on the way home not to call and ask about the dog as it would be highly unlikely that if he survived the freezing nights, that he would evade the many coyotes in the area.

Two days later, we got a call that the dachshund had been recovered by putting his old blanket under an old picnic table over on the abandoned farmstead where he was last seen. She went over there very early that morning and there he was, shivering under his blanket.

I think I know how he survived the coyotes. He is the meanest darn dog that I have ever owned. The first week home he attacked both my retrievers and split their noses. There are probably some skinned-up coyotes out there somewhere. His dog/people bite count hovers at 17. At sixteen years old, he is not quite as bad as he once was. He hasn't bitten anyone but my Lab in 2 years....

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from JD wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

WA Mtnhunter,

Good that old dachshund has settled down, they surely have a mean streak a mile wide. But at his age, 16, 112 in people years he is due to settle down some. They tend to bite less when it hurts those old teeth more than the intended target!

Phil, I am so sorry about your Ike, just keep taking him for some long walks on some country trails if he stays nearby your side.

All, sorry I unloaded on old ss3 so hard,just had enough of the child's intrusions.

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from Mock1 wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Sorry about Ike. i've got a 8 year old Black Lab named Elway. Two mos ago he started limping really badly. I was worried about his hips and finally took him to the vet fearing the worst. The vet looked at him and said that he thinks he just sprained something. He's fine now but alot of grey on his muzzle. Since that scare, I've taken him hunting for everything but deer. Last mon my freind whacked a Bufflehead in a pretty nasty swampy area. Would have took 40 mins to wade thru the muck to get it. Elway got it in 40m seconds. Next shot I shoot a bluebill about 30 yards out over lake Erie. Elway daintily climbed down huge rocks, jumped in the lake, get the duck in about amin. He comes over to me, sits down and drops the duck at my feet. Yesterday my friend came home w/ a brand spanking 6 week old lab. He said he couldn't live w/o one after seeing Elway work. I hope he never dies although I know it's gonna happen. I don't know how I'll face that day

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from Zermoid wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Clay,
Doxies (Dachshund) were originally bred to "go to ground", ie. follow a rat, badger, etc. into it's burrow, kill it and bring it back to it's owner. And seeing your post I am assuming it's a smooth coat, as Black & Tan isn't a wirehaired color and Longhair Doxies usually are much more "mellow" than the other Miniature Doxie types!
Wanna have some fun? Get a Red Miniature Longhaired Doxie and put him in with a litter of Irish Setter pups, everyone looks at them and ask "What's wrong with that one pup?"!

I'm glad to see I'm not the only person who likes Break-Free! I've had "Gun Experts" at a large local gun shop tell me to not use it, that it is worthless junk and that I should use XXXXXXXXXXXX that costs 4x the price because if I don't all my guns will disintegrate into a pile of dust, or something just as ridiculous. (Honestly I pretty much quit listening when they dissed my Break-Free!)
I've been using it for about 15 years now, works great, apply it and let it sit overnight, give it another coat and let that soak in as well. Any metal covered like that will be almost impervious to rust for about a year.
It also has almost completely replaced my solvents, cleans and oils the bore all at once. Only use solvents on EXTREMELY fouled bores and parts, Break-Free cleans most minor crud buildups, only exception is if I fire some corrosive Mil Surplus ammo. That get's a Corrosive Ammo Neutralized cleaning followed by Break-Free.

And personally the first thing I do with a new (or used and new to me) gun is take it completely apart and clean out all the grease, gunk and grime (I don't think any of the local gun shops disassemble and/or clean used guns!) and wipe it down with Break-Free, all parts get twice coated with Break-Free and then re-assembled.
It works for me!

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from hunting022 wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Sorry to hear about Ike. I know how hard it is to see a dog with health problems like that. I had to put my English Springer down at age 22 when she was diagnosed
with cancer. She was outperforming 2 and 3 year old at 13. As for the guns, yea I have done the same thing. New Ruger Red Label on pheasant. Not a good thing in front of a hunting guide.

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

Sorry to hear about your dog, my wife has a Lhasa Apso that is 17, still getting around pretty well but slowing don enough to make us worry.

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

The Military has been using Break Free for about 30 years!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Please note, if you use Break Free like I have for High Power Rifle Competition in the bore to reduce the copper fouling, be sure to fire 3 rounds. The first round will be high and the 3rd should be dead on!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

That 4th Generation 4 Runner above looks like a City Boys Car!

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from Jere Smith wrote 3 years 21 weeks ago

Update on my Lhasa she died at 17 1/2.

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