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Petzal: Why Dry Firing a Rifle Can Help You Shoot Better

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April 23, 2010

Petzal: Why Dry Firing a Rifle Can Help You Shoot Better

By David E. Petzal

One of the most useful tools in the ongoing struggle to shoot good is dry firing—aiming and snapping the trigger with no ammo in the chamber. Dry firing had no greater champion than the late Creighton Audette, a gunsmith, a friend of mine, and a high-power competitor who was good enough to shoot on the Palma Team, and coach it. “Recoil,” he said, “is a form of distraction.” He believed that any serious shooter should do far more dry-firing than practice with live ammo. (Creighton also said “Everyone should have at least one gun the government doesn’t know about,” if you need any further proof of his wisdom.)

The Marine Corps used to start its marksmanship training with a solid week of nothing but “snapping in”—dry fire from the basic shooting positions--to show the maggots how to do things correctly before they got live ammo. Dry fire allows you to concentrate, without distraction, on the instant when the trigger lets go and the instant immediately afterward, when so much can go wrong.

Dry fire, however, is not for every firearm. It’s OK to dry-fire most bolt-action rifles, but the practice can damage most .22s, just about all shotguns, and some handguns. If you are in doubt about its effect on your firearms, consult your gunsmith.

It’s invaluable, costs nothing, won’t give you a flinch, and makes no noise. Dry-fire a lot and you will shoot better. As Ed Zern said, “Keep your powder, your martinis, your trout flies, and your fire, dry.”

Comments (50)

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from dukkillr wrote 4 years 1 day ago

Wow. The old (supposedly) mountain man saying "Keep your powder dry" has grown exponentially. Nice, very nice.

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from mutt wrote 4 years 1 day ago

not a bad bit of logic. I can't think of the actual name for them but, what is your take on those "snap caps" for dry firing with?

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from MJC wrote 4 years 1 day ago

Aren't they just called snap caps? I use them for my K-31. They may not be needed but it's an old gun, so better safe than sorry.

The USMC no longer snaps in? Bummer. That taught me a lot.

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from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 1 day ago

My son took that advice to the extreme. He cut photos of live animals (deer, squirrel, etc...) out of magazines and pasted them to cardboard and hung them about his room. He then dry fired using snap caps... he made the school rifle team and I don't want him shooting at me...

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from jscottevans wrote 4 years 1 day ago

Sound advice DEP, a lot like beginner self-defense gun classes where you spend more time practicing your draw and safely clearing the gun than you do shooting. You need to put critical actions like squeezing the trigger to motor-memory before you get distracted by the recoil as Audette stated. I would suppose he ( and you for that fact) would also suggest that shooting a .22 a lot helps your mechanism as well. Not just ripping through ammo but making well-placed and accurate shots time and time again. Cheaper and less distracting.

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from seadog wrote 4 years 1 day ago

Excellent advice. Cost of ammo--$0, range fees--$0, improved accuracy--priceless!

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from ishawooa wrote 4 years 1 day ago

I like snap caps as I do not have to be concerned about anything breaking. Also, and this might be a somewhat faulty statement, it also assures me that there is not a live round in the chamber inspite of checking twice. If you have ever been around an accidental discharge you know what I mean. Some expensive double guns come with snap caps for practice.
I reinterate the caution to be exercised with dry firing older guns of all types. Some will not withstand the dry firing without snap caps. A fine example of what should have not happened but did took place with a valuable but elderly .22 semi-automatic of mine about a month ago. A friend asked to see it so I got it from the gun safe, removed the magazine, and checked to be sure it was not loaded. I handed it to him and he immediately also looked in the chamber. He apparently decided to try the trigger and pulled it before I could say anything. About a week later I took several guns out in the desert to shoot. The old .22 failed to shoot and appears to have a broken firing spring. A trip to the gunsmith will tell.

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from Dann wrote 4 years 1 day ago

USMC still snaps in. The basic course is a week of snapping in using the various postions and a week of live fire. Near the end of my Navy career, I was fortunate enough to be allowed to attend the Marine 2 week basic marksman course.
The Ssgt destroyed 20 years of bad shooting habits and taught me the Marine Corps way. At the end of the 2nd week, I put 9 out of 10 in the black at 500 meters, open sights, M-16, 5.56mm.
Fortunately, it was month before deer season....

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from Roscoe wrote 4 years 1 day ago

When I was single and had more time for Trap shooting, I'd spend lots of time with the 12-gauge practicing my mount, mounting and swinging along the point where the wall meets the ceiling, and dry-firing with snap-caps.

No better, cheaper practice out there!

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from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 22 hours ago

What about pumps like my Rem 760? Would inserting a spent cartridge alleviate the problem in shotguns etc?

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from Gman wrote 4 years 21 hours ago

I learned the hard way about dry-firing a Remington 870 when I was a kid. Was watching American Sportsman, drew a bead on a flight coming in over some decoys, pulled the trigger...and heard the firing pin snap and put a little dark dot right in the middle of the screen. The folks were not amused.

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from fng wrote 4 years 20 hours ago

I was told by my father to go downstairs, set up my first rifle ( a vanguard, a few months ago), set up a bipod, set the scpoe on an ineteresting dot on the stairs, and beat up snap caps for hours. Besides scaring my mom snotless a few times (OOPS!) it helped my shooting ALOT.

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from huntnfishnut wrote 4 years 20 hours ago

I was trying to sight in the scope on my .30-06 Seemed to be impossible, shots were all over the place. After several rounds, I forgot to take my safety off and flinched hard when I pulled the trigger. Knowing I was flinching that hard, my next three shots were touching each other in the center of the blocks, no further adjustments needed.

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from mihunter wrote 4 years 19 hours ago

THANK YOU! i have been telling my shooting buddies this a while now. i'll admit i thought it was stupid when i first heard about it....until i tried it. THIS HAS HELPED ME EXTREMELY!! i am twice a better shooter now. When i go to the range for about 10 mins i do this just to get into the groove.

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from Sarge01 wrote 4 years 18 hours ago

The officers used to say nasty things about me after a couple hours of dry firing with a penny lying on the front sight of a S&W 4566TSW. They didn't like doing it but it made them much better shooters. I could always tell which officers were dry firing at home on their own.

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from dmattix wrote 4 years 17 hours ago

Yup. The Marine Corp still spends a week learning positions and dry firing -- "Grass Week." Then comes firing week (200,300 and 500yd courses of fire). The Son&Heir just completed Marine basic and is back up at Pendleton for Combat Training now.

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 17 hours ago

It's kinda of a funny thing to practice the dry fire, recoil issues being the main offender, but getting to "know" your gun's trigger pull is the helpful friend here. BUT WHILE HUNTING a shooter can empty the magazine and not feel a darn thing in recoil or blast!?

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from The White Slug wrote 4 years 16 hours ago

The same principles pertain to the art of amore.

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from argoman wrote 4 years 13 hours ago

recoil is the name of the game in target shooting. handle the recoil and you handle the shot. sight picture is the name of the game for hunting. squeese when the sights are on, what recoil?? lets see your fancy dancy famous 45 auto shooters shoot with full house loads. i shoot a 45 super long slide and there is no way i can compete with a down loaded 45 race gun. snap caps are fine for learning when your trigger breaks (over center), but recoil is a whole another story.

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from Bella wrote 4 years 7 hours ago

When I teach I use snap caps too. I keep snap caps in my shotgun when it ain't in use too.

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from Del in KS wrote 4 years 7 hours ago

Jim in Mo take an empty shell. Punch out the primer and insert a pencil eraser nice and tight then use a sharp knife to trim the surface flat with the bottom of the shell. It works and costs nearly nothing. A spent primer will not spring back so the used shell probably would not work.

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from elmer f. wrote 4 years 7 hours ago

i would agree with that. and for the firearms that can be damaged by dry fireing, there is always the snap cap option. that is what my boy and i do for our 22 rimfires. the only problem with those cheap little peice of plastic is they dont last long if you dry fire much. personally, i would rather shoot, but we live to close to to many people to shoot. so that means a trip to the woods. dry fireing is something we can do together, sometimes even while watching tv.

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from Sarge01 wrote 4 years 6 hours ago

Our officers learned to manage full house loads as you call them in their .45's because we shot on the range what they carried on duty, 230 Grain Speer Gold Dot Hollow Points and yes you can tell a difference between the duty rounds and some rounds that have been watered down as I call it. That may not be the correct term.
When a new officer started I had to control myself when he looked like he or she was going to punch the front end of the firearm in the dirt when they expected recoil. I viedoed a lot of training and then showed it to them and this was a great training tool.

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from ohiodeerhunter wrote 4 years 5 hours ago

Del in KS

Thanks for the pencil eraser idea,I'll try that one out this weekend.
Sounds logical to me,as long as the firing pin hits something,it should not be in danger of breaking the pin or spring.

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from Bernie wrote 4 years 5 hours ago

I was already a pretty good rifleman when I enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1968 at age 19, but "snapping in" definitely improved my shooting because we "maggots" learned proper rifle shooting positions. I have never forgotten that instruction. I equate it with the first year of Latin that I took as a high school freshman. Latin taught me the English language just as "snapping in" taught me the proper way to shoot a rifle.

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from yohan wrote 4 years 4 hours ago

Absolulty correct ,.

What many . dont understand is lock time.
Which is the time it takes the pin after being released by the sear,. to strike the primer, which makes the gun go boom.
Said instant in time ( boom !!) being the pont where you can do nothing more to ( be )direct the bullet.

Recently I bought a Marlin xl7,. as there was some news that Marlin was closing the doors :) later retracted .

They don't have a metric caliber (something civilized like 6.5 or 7mm or 8mm ) ,.270's to me are sissy guns ;) and 25-06 for women ,.. so I got a 30-06.
yuk yuk

The old gunsmith ( my deceased father) would be proud. As he considered his sons predisposition for metric rounds slightly confusing and maybe a tad strange.
He never said that but I know he looked side ways at some of the smoke poles I turned up with over the years.

Once when inspecting a 7 x 62 Mauser 98 (my favorite action ) ,. he asked why i didnt just buy a 30-06.

I did buy a couple over the years but always sold em
So ,. now I have a 30-06 again ,.which I do not intend to sell.
He would be pleased at that Im sure .
He used to say ya know Yohan dis IS da United States,
ya know ??and you are a citizen ya know ??

Anyway I like the Xl7 rifle,. truth is I like it more than I want to.

Kinda like women,. sometimes the ones,. that at first you wouldnt give a second glance ,.later turn out to be more than expected. Those women however scare me.

Anyway the lock time on that gun ( XL&) is quicker than anything I have. Which if you compareing price's is really saying something.
Only problem was,.I needed a windless and both hands to to pull the trigger when i first got it ,. so I took that down as far as it wouid go,.. and while its ok for hunting, if I could get it smidge lighter i would.
Trigger breaks clean,. no creep,. and after dry firing it 100 +/- times.
I now know ( pretty much) when it will go boom.

Lord knows,. certain individuals commonly refered to as neigbors have felt thier skin crawl haveing no idea they were in the cross hairs of an empty rifle ~~click!! YUK YUK
Especially that little pip-sqeek attorney up the road who rides by on his 437 speed dipwad-hibread space bicycle,. wearing those funny lookin shorts the wierd lookin shoes and that pin head helmet.
But i digress

When hunting knowing the trigger and lock time goes a long way to getting a bang flop,. and not an animal flopping off through the bush that now needs two more rounds.

Pushing 60 now,. I submit: A case in point.

Waay "Up Nort" jogging behind a guide 30 years my junior ,.. we just made it into position for a shot at a nice 4 legged ungulat sporting decent head gear.
No record,.but but I liked what I saw.
Now ,..no brag intended here ,..
But I am now and was then in better shape than most 10-15 yers my junior ,.The fact that I cross country ski a fair amount in additon to other excersize dosent hurt.
None the less after that little jaunt I was pretty winded and of course axcitd with a fair amont of adrenal secretion.
Not sucking air like bullhead on a dirt bank in 90 degree weather, but winded

But becuase you do not shoot that particular gun for long at targets I knew from muscle memeory ( dry fireing) when the gun was ( in the words of a woman I see socially) going to "make boom" YUK YUK "
And no not boomboom ( pre-verts) )
BOOM as it bang flop.
So I made the shot,.. between,... heart beats.
Any body who has done some shooting,..
and had to run and then had to shoot knows what that is or they should anyway.
It was not a long shot 85-90 yds +/-
But no way in " H " I would have anchored that animal if I did not know the trigger and the lock time.

Oh and By the way Mr Petzal ,.. haveing only run 18 rounds of factory Winchester 180 gr ( moose loads) through the Xl7. Depending on whom one talks to the barrel may well not be quiet broken in yet .??

Thusly with no time on the 100 or 200 yd range which I will get to
At 50 yds the last three i fired were just over 1/2 inch. Now the only concern I have now is that this infernal upstart Marlin plastic stock with the
cheap ( neraly wothless) scope that came on it.
Will proceed to summarily embaraase my pet Mausers .

Which will kinda pi$$ me off :) ,..
But it will Im sure,. make the old gunsmith smile.

Maybe marlins time has come ??

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from focusfront wrote 4 years 1 hour ago

A real nasty shooting drill is to load a shooter's revolver and leave a couple of cylinders empty. Or, to load a rifle shooter's magazine with a couple of snap cap rounds. If he's flinching you'll see it clearly, and so will the shooter.

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from Mike Diehl wrote 4 years 59 min ago

"A real nasty shooting drill is to load a shooter's revolver and leave a couple of cylinders empty. Or, to load a rifle shooter's magazine with a couple of snap cap rounds. If he's flinching you'll see it clearly, and so will the shooter."

I am a self-trained handgun user. Was trained boy scout and summer camp with rifles but eventually a few years back bought a handgun. Read mountains on proper technique before I fired a shot.

The drill you mention worked REALLY WELL for improving my accuracy and my consistency. Every now and then I take my single six to the range and spend an hour just sitting there snapping the cylinder with a cylider loaded EELLEL (where E is a spent or empty brass and L is a live round), roulette the cylinder once so I don't know where I'm starting in the pattern and fire until they're all gone. Reload to the same pattern and repeat. It really works well for me. It's made my semiauto handgun shooting MUCH better.

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from Pip wrote 4 years 7 min ago

Does anyone happen to know what happens if you dry fire lever guns like the Marlin 336?

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from 99explorer wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

I once owned a Marlin 336 in .30-30 cal. It failed to fire once when I tried to shoot a snake, and I took it to a gunsmith, who told me I had a broken firing pin. As I had not put more than one box of ammo through it, I can only conclude that the cause was excessive dry-firing.

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from sarg wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

One little trick I learned in the Air Force in '62 was to get in position ,sight the target then just close your eyes or look away for a second. then look at target again, If you have to pull back to your target, you will have troubl hitting especially if a second shot is required.You shouldn't have to reposition each and every shot...Especially useful fwhen shooting auto's......Did they teach you that Clay when you went through Basic?

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from focusfront wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

Sarg;

Finding your natural point of aim makes hitting much easier. Back when I could shoot and hit anything, the whole game was getting good at positions so that the sights would just naturally rest on the bullseye as you held the rifle. Beyond that and a good trigger pull, all that's left to hitting the target is wind doping. You learn the good trigger through dry firing. From the things he writes in this blog I suspect Dave is a pretty good shot.

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from wingshooter54 wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

When I was a kid my play rifle was an old, unserviceable Krag Jorgenson chambered for some obscure 6.5 cartridge; a wall-hanger that Dad allowed me to drag around. I was in hog heaven and the envy of many of my contemporaries. (couldn't you just hear the anti-gun people screaming if they had been if force back then?) I cannot tell you how many imaginary bad guys, buffalo, elephants, deer, elk and so on were in that old Krag's sights. I learned early on about two stage triggers and must have dry fired thousands upon thousands of times. Any success I have today putting the bullet where I aim whether with pistol or rifle is surely a result of those wonderful days.

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from Ozark Hunter wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

What a bucket of worms!

Snapping a firearm? From a meteorology point of view it’s not a good idea. Take two hammers and start pounding them together and see what happens. But whatever floats your cork I say. I've witnessed several broken firing pins. Military rifles can take it, but not civilian rifles.

If you’re shooting High Power, train with 22 Long Rifle. If shooting 22 Long Rifle, train with Air Rifle. I can take an Air rifle Competitor and make them a Small Bore Shooter or Small Bore Shooter to make them a High Power Shooter. But it's exceptionally difficult to do it in reverse order and that's why I had a Young Teenage Girl start with Small Bore and the following year went to the Whittington Center in June 86 for the Olympic Tryouts. If I allowed her to shoot High Power, she would’ve never made the invitation and National exposure she received.

There’s more to it than just dry firing and follow through and where the guns goes off at what point of aim does matter. Chances are, you’re out in the field and your sights are doing a figure eight on the critter. You must know when to squeeze to get the right timing down for when the trigger breaks. Personally, I like live fire at long range on fist size rocks where you get instant results!
Bottom line, the most overlooked part of shooting is about timing and follow through!

At the time of the strike of the firing pin, you will move the gun significantly enough to miss!

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from Ozark Hunter wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

meteorology?

How about Metallurgy!

Besides, both have the same effect when a moving object come in contact with a none moving object, something gots to give!

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from Ozark Hunter wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

One of the best scores I ever shot is the day I was feeling like crap and forgot my Sudafed and Tylenol! Yep, small doses of Sudafed and other feel good drugs will make a negative impact on your shooting ability even if make you feel totally better!

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from yohan wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

I agree with sarg and focus front and also Mike D.

To witt:

Using a plain ( no sights ) smooth bore 12 ga. Which kicked so hard it broke my nose twice, with winchester ammunition.
( later determined to be slightly under bored by a gun smith I knew pretty well) But also not as violent with Remmington slugs.

With a stock designed for pointing, too short for me in the first palce.
When I crawled the stock trying to aim it.
I got a thumb in the nose hard enough to cause minor break. Being Norwegian it took twice for that to sink in.
But as formr ( amature) boxer I know what a broken nose is,. and that combination sure as shootn broke my damn nose. Twice
By the next summer I couldnt shoot a cap gun without flinching.

So I started over,. dry fireing at first ,. then the biggest thing i shot for a month was a 22.
After which a range rat friend of mine volonteered to
hand me a rifle ( still a 22) which may or may not have a live round in the chamber.
The drill was ,.no looky,. just shooty ; )
That was very telling and went a long way to fixing the problem.
Next was 30-30 on up to 9.3 Mauser which kicks.

Which is how it became abundantly clear as to why it is waaay more important than people think ( realize) to have a stock that fits and is designed for the intended use. Dont see the need for custom stocks but for sure not one that simply does not fit.
One can absorb a lot of recoil if it isnt directed primarily at your nose ; )

What I also found was that noise ( muzzle blast) was a big factor.
Having used hearing protection for a long time
With to me no noticable diffence,. other than to protect my ear drums .
Once possessed of the evil flinch,. hearing protection was also a major factor in retraining the brain.

So now Im back to normal,.what ever that is.
Probbaly for me , a state of mind that says
Well Yohan,. you own guns that will very likley shoot better than you can shoot em.
But as long as your shooting within your personal limits (mine is 200 yds and very occasionally slightly more 250 or so ) without incurring facial injury allowing you cleanly humainly kill ( an oxymoron in itslef ) that which you detemine is appropriate table fair in a reasonable and sportsman like manor then you can take your place in the hunting woods.

My criteria by the way is not so much distance,.
its three inches,.
I know I can get most shots to stay with three inches at 200 yds and that is my benchmark optimal limit.
I have had a guide or two queston that .
With my polite respose being this or words to ths effect.
.
Once long ago and far away on a distant plant called northern Wisconsin. Which aint nowhere ,.. but next door to nowhere.
I killed a deer very very badly,. and those images still haunt me ,. I also had to shoot a
"bad mean a$$ dog" which I was too young to do, and I didnt do that well either.
I do not like thinking of either,. butI do.
Thusly ,. since im the guy paying for the trip, maybe I
should be the guy deciding how far I should shoot.
So I dont have to make anymore bad memories.
Trth is Im OK out to about 300
But,.. if you say that then they want you to shoot 350 and unlesits almost straight down I aint gonna do that.

By the by ,. hearing more and more about shooting things like deer moose sheep etc. located in the adjacent zip code. I must be out of touch
Can anyone tell me aside from the 50 cal class ,.
what these guys are using ?
and how much the guns weigh? an what kind of glass are they using ?

And one other thing
I have friends and aquainteces from all over. Some in Norway not many in Swededn : ) and a few other countries

Recenlty I was having a friendly chat with
a German woman ( from Germany) who is not a hunter but is an occasional shooter. She likes to punch papaer with light cal guns. Tell ya what ,she can puch my paper any time she wants YUK YUK
This individual actually admires those who hunt "if its done it classy respectful manor" ( not my words hers)
And get this fellow bloggers,she ( and she says ) many of her European contemopraris (both men and women) view hunting as an honorable classic activity considered more of an "individual calling ".than the some times "group slaughter" attitude that she here's of here.
Respected for honoring the sport they pursue as well as the gane they take, large or small no ganme is wasted .
Hunters there are viewd diferntly ??

She went furher to say that many ,.( most ) of the hunters men a nad women she knew in Germany.
Were also exellent cooks. and that to be invited to a wild game dinner was considerd something of an honor and rather big deal.

She went on to allude to the fact that
a bunch of ya-hoo's hi 5-ing and swilling bear over that which they have just killed,gives fuel and ammunition to the anti's. Interesting thought ,.is it not ??

Also while she readily admits the land of the free and the home of the brave together with Alied forces kicked her coutries ass to and for the betterment of the world. While the Us affords many many more opportunities than in Europe. The use and treatment of game is very casual in te use.

Her take is that the ant-hunting contingent would be weakened considernbly and quickly
If in fact we adjusted our outward behavior which would affect greatly percived attitudes of those who do not hunt.
Her futher words were,. "like all things 10% ( slob huntes) can ruin it or make it redicioulsy hard for the 90 % who are honoranble well intended hunters and sportsmen & women.

I came away from that conversation with a different perspective.

Hope yall have a good sunday,.

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from buckhunter wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

I'm wondering if the military philosophy of dry fire practice came about during the hard kicking M1 Garand era and lost some usefulness when the light kicking M16 came about?

I never dry fired at the range.

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from 86Ram wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

Dime Washer Drills & Shadow boxes also help (takes tw0 personnel)

You put a dime or washer on the muzzle of your weapon after you assume a good prone or good shooting position and dry fire your weaapon.
This helps you steady your aim as well as identifies habits (trigger pull/jerk) etc

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from 86Ram wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

idea is to keep the dime on the muzzle with out it falling off

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from Carney wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Had a guy at the range give me this same dry firing advice just yesterday. The occasion was I had just finished qualifications for position shooting. The shooting club had a few bullets leave the range so they instituted a qualification program for anyone wanting to shoot positions other than bench or compete in NRA or CMP high power competitions.

It was my first opportunity to shoot an M1. Open sights; 3 shots in each position: prone, seated and standing at both 100 & 200 yards. The spotter could only count eight holes in my 200 yard target, so I was sweating it a bit until they found the 9th hole in the X ring!!

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from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Del in Ks,
Good tip, thanks.

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from cas0905 wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

are BARs dry fireable?

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from scott powers wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

dry firing a gun can help even the best fo shoot ers but if you want to praticed even better you should get a buddy to load your gun for you. get him to put an old cace in sometimes so you dont damage the pin on the gun. also get him to put in a live round when he thinks that it is most needed.

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from Ricardo Rodríguez wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Two years ago we borrowed from another club an instructor for a month for rifle shooting, a cuban fellow who had been a military shooting instructor in Angola and ex olimpic shooter, who now trains shooters from kids with air guns up to Panamerican and Olimpic level ones.
He always insisted in dry firing at the wall the first 15 minutes of shooting practice to warm up, then start dry firing at paper or silhuettes, and finally use live ammo.
He also instructed us to close our eyes and open them immediately to see if our point of aim had moved, and acomodate our feet or body until it didn´t, so that our body was not subject to tension.
Another excersise he put us to do was to try to keep aiming for as long as 10 minutes before actually shooting.

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from Ozark Hunter wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

Dry firing?

Dar He was!

Nice 7/8 curl Ram at 300 yards!

Gun went click!

Cycled the bolt, CLICK!

His buddy who already limited out handed him his gun, BOOM!

They remover the bolt and the firing pin fractured from dry firing.

What really sucked, he shot his once in a lifetime trophy with someone elses rifle!

If that what blows your kilt up doing dry firing? Go for it, just better hope you have a backup rifle and a second chance tomorrow!!

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from Ozark Hunter wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

Ricardo Rodríguez

Another excersise he put us to do was to try to keep aiming for as long as 10 minutes before actually shooting?

Not a good idea! Look at the clock on the wall for even one minute then look to the side. What do you see!

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from Ricardo Rodríguez wrote 3 years 48 weeks ago

Ozark Hunter,
I didn´t mention it , but that was aiming at the actual target, or in this case, silhuete. The excersise was in steps, first one minute, then 3, 5, and finnally 10. The purpose was to build up pulse steadyness and concentration. If we got tired could rest a little, stretch and reassume standing position. When time was up, he give us the fire command and we started shooting.

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from grant77 wrote 3 years 41 weeks ago

thanks for the advice dave

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from New Age Bubba wrote 2 years 33 weeks ago

Don't try this with your expensive spring powered pellet guns!

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from Del in KS wrote 4 years 7 hours ago

Jim in Mo take an empty shell. Punch out the primer and insert a pencil eraser nice and tight then use a sharp knife to trim the surface flat with the bottom of the shell. It works and costs nearly nothing. A spent primer will not spring back so the used shell probably would not work.

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from Dann wrote 4 years 1 day ago

USMC still snaps in. The basic course is a week of snapping in using the various postions and a week of live fire. Near the end of my Navy career, I was fortunate enough to be allowed to attend the Marine 2 week basic marksman course.
The Ssgt destroyed 20 years of bad shooting habits and taught me the Marine Corps way. At the end of the 2nd week, I put 9 out of 10 in the black at 500 meters, open sights, M-16, 5.56mm.
Fortunately, it was month before deer season....

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from Mike Diehl wrote 4 years 59 min ago

"A real nasty shooting drill is to load a shooter's revolver and leave a couple of cylinders empty. Or, to load a rifle shooter's magazine with a couple of snap cap rounds. If he's flinching you'll see it clearly, and so will the shooter."

I am a self-trained handgun user. Was trained boy scout and summer camp with rifles but eventually a few years back bought a handgun. Read mountains on proper technique before I fired a shot.

The drill you mention worked REALLY WELL for improving my accuracy and my consistency. Every now and then I take my single six to the range and spend an hour just sitting there snapping the cylinder with a cylider loaded EELLEL (where E is a spent or empty brass and L is a live round), roulette the cylinder once so I don't know where I'm starting in the pattern and fire until they're all gone. Reload to the same pattern and repeat. It really works well for me. It's made my semiauto handgun shooting MUCH better.

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from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 1 day ago

My son took that advice to the extreme. He cut photos of live animals (deer, squirrel, etc...) out of magazines and pasted them to cardboard and hung them about his room. He then dry fired using snap caps... he made the school rifle team and I don't want him shooting at me...

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from jscottevans wrote 4 years 1 day ago

Sound advice DEP, a lot like beginner self-defense gun classes where you spend more time practicing your draw and safely clearing the gun than you do shooting. You need to put critical actions like squeezing the trigger to motor-memory before you get distracted by the recoil as Audette stated. I would suppose he ( and you for that fact) would also suggest that shooting a .22 a lot helps your mechanism as well. Not just ripping through ammo but making well-placed and accurate shots time and time again. Cheaper and less distracting.

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from Roscoe wrote 4 years 1 day ago

When I was single and had more time for Trap shooting, I'd spend lots of time with the 12-gauge practicing my mount, mounting and swinging along the point where the wall meets the ceiling, and dry-firing with snap-caps.

No better, cheaper practice out there!

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from Gman wrote 4 years 21 hours ago

I learned the hard way about dry-firing a Remington 870 when I was a kid. Was watching American Sportsman, drew a bead on a flight coming in over some decoys, pulled the trigger...and heard the firing pin snap and put a little dark dot right in the middle of the screen. The folks were not amused.

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 17 hours ago

It's kinda of a funny thing to practice the dry fire, recoil issues being the main offender, but getting to "know" your gun's trigger pull is the helpful friend here. BUT WHILE HUNTING a shooter can empty the magazine and not feel a darn thing in recoil or blast!?

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from Sarge01 wrote 4 years 6 hours ago

Our officers learned to manage full house loads as you call them in their .45's because we shot on the range what they carried on duty, 230 Grain Speer Gold Dot Hollow Points and yes you can tell a difference between the duty rounds and some rounds that have been watered down as I call it. That may not be the correct term.
When a new officer started I had to control myself when he looked like he or she was going to punch the front end of the firearm in the dirt when they expected recoil. I viedoed a lot of training and then showed it to them and this was a great training tool.

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from Bernie wrote 4 years 5 hours ago

I was already a pretty good rifleman when I enlisted in the Marine Corps in 1968 at age 19, but "snapping in" definitely improved my shooting because we "maggots" learned proper rifle shooting positions. I have never forgotten that instruction. I equate it with the first year of Latin that I took as a high school freshman. Latin taught me the English language just as "snapping in" taught me the proper way to shoot a rifle.

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from dukkillr wrote 4 years 1 day ago

Wow. The old (supposedly) mountain man saying "Keep your powder dry" has grown exponentially. Nice, very nice.

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from MJC wrote 4 years 1 day ago

Aren't they just called snap caps? I use them for my K-31. They may not be needed but it's an old gun, so better safe than sorry.

The USMC no longer snaps in? Bummer. That taught me a lot.

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from fng wrote 4 years 20 hours ago

I was told by my father to go downstairs, set up my first rifle ( a vanguard, a few months ago), set up a bipod, set the scpoe on an ineteresting dot on the stairs, and beat up snap caps for hours. Besides scaring my mom snotless a few times (OOPS!) it helped my shooting ALOT.

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from huntnfishnut wrote 4 years 20 hours ago

I was trying to sight in the scope on my .30-06 Seemed to be impossible, shots were all over the place. After several rounds, I forgot to take my safety off and flinched hard when I pulled the trigger. Knowing I was flinching that hard, my next three shots were touching each other in the center of the blocks, no further adjustments needed.

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from Sarge01 wrote 4 years 18 hours ago

The officers used to say nasty things about me after a couple hours of dry firing with a penny lying on the front sight of a S&W 4566TSW. They didn't like doing it but it made them much better shooters. I could always tell which officers were dry firing at home on their own.

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from dmattix wrote 4 years 17 hours ago

Yup. The Marine Corp still spends a week learning positions and dry firing -- "Grass Week." Then comes firing week (200,300 and 500yd courses of fire). The Son&Heir just completed Marine basic and is back up at Pendleton for Combat Training now.

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from The White Slug wrote 4 years 16 hours ago

The same principles pertain to the art of amore.

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from argoman wrote 4 years 13 hours ago

recoil is the name of the game in target shooting. handle the recoil and you handle the shot. sight picture is the name of the game for hunting. squeese when the sights are on, what recoil?? lets see your fancy dancy famous 45 auto shooters shoot with full house loads. i shoot a 45 super long slide and there is no way i can compete with a down loaded 45 race gun. snap caps are fine for learning when your trigger breaks (over center), but recoil is a whole another story.

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from yohan wrote 4 years 4 hours ago

Absolulty correct ,.

What many . dont understand is lock time.
Which is the time it takes the pin after being released by the sear,. to strike the primer, which makes the gun go boom.
Said instant in time ( boom !!) being the pont where you can do nothing more to ( be )direct the bullet.

Recently I bought a Marlin xl7,. as there was some news that Marlin was closing the doors :) later retracted .

They don't have a metric caliber (something civilized like 6.5 or 7mm or 8mm ) ,.270's to me are sissy guns ;) and 25-06 for women ,.. so I got a 30-06.
yuk yuk

The old gunsmith ( my deceased father) would be proud. As he considered his sons predisposition for metric rounds slightly confusing and maybe a tad strange.
He never said that but I know he looked side ways at some of the smoke poles I turned up with over the years.

Once when inspecting a 7 x 62 Mauser 98 (my favorite action ) ,. he asked why i didnt just buy a 30-06.

I did buy a couple over the years but always sold em
So ,. now I have a 30-06 again ,.which I do not intend to sell.
He would be pleased at that Im sure .
He used to say ya know Yohan dis IS da United States,
ya know ??and you are a citizen ya know ??

Anyway I like the Xl7 rifle,. truth is I like it more than I want to.

Kinda like women,. sometimes the ones,. that at first you wouldnt give a second glance ,.later turn out to be more than expected. Those women however scare me.

Anyway the lock time on that gun ( XL&) is quicker than anything I have. Which if you compareing price's is really saying something.
Only problem was,.I needed a windless and both hands to to pull the trigger when i first got it ,. so I took that down as far as it wouid go,.. and while its ok for hunting, if I could get it smidge lighter i would.
Trigger breaks clean,. no creep,. and after dry firing it 100 +/- times.
I now know ( pretty much) when it will go boom.

Lord knows,. certain individuals commonly refered to as neigbors have felt thier skin crawl haveing no idea they were in the cross hairs of an empty rifle ~~click!! YUK YUK
Especially that little pip-sqeek attorney up the road who rides by on his 437 speed dipwad-hibread space bicycle,. wearing those funny lookin shorts the wierd lookin shoes and that pin head helmet.
But i digress

When hunting knowing the trigger and lock time goes a long way to getting a bang flop,. and not an animal flopping off through the bush that now needs two more rounds.

Pushing 60 now,. I submit: A case in point.

Waay "Up Nort" jogging behind a guide 30 years my junior ,.. we just made it into position for a shot at a nice 4 legged ungulat sporting decent head gear.
No record,.but but I liked what I saw.
Now ,..no brag intended here ,..
But I am now and was then in better shape than most 10-15 yers my junior ,.The fact that I cross country ski a fair amount in additon to other excersize dosent hurt.
None the less after that little jaunt I was pretty winded and of course axcitd with a fair amont of adrenal secretion.
Not sucking air like bullhead on a dirt bank in 90 degree weather, but winded

But becuase you do not shoot that particular gun for long at targets I knew from muscle memeory ( dry fireing) when the gun was ( in the words of a woman I see socially) going to "make boom" YUK YUK "
And no not boomboom ( pre-verts) )
BOOM as it bang flop.
So I made the shot,.. between,... heart beats.
Any body who has done some shooting,..
and had to run and then had to shoot knows what that is or they should anyway.
It was not a long shot 85-90 yds +/-
But no way in " H " I would have anchored that animal if I did not know the trigger and the lock time.

Oh and By the way Mr Petzal ,.. haveing only run 18 rounds of factory Winchester 180 gr ( moose loads) through the Xl7. Depending on whom one talks to the barrel may well not be quiet broken in yet .??

Thusly with no time on the 100 or 200 yd range which I will get to
At 50 yds the last three i fired were just over 1/2 inch. Now the only concern I have now is that this infernal upstart Marlin plastic stock with the
cheap ( neraly wothless) scope that came on it.
Will proceed to summarily embaraase my pet Mausers .

Which will kinda pi$$ me off :) ,..
But it will Im sure,. make the old gunsmith smile.

Maybe marlins time has come ??

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from focusfront wrote 4 years 1 hour ago

A real nasty shooting drill is to load a shooter's revolver and leave a couple of cylinders empty. Or, to load a rifle shooter's magazine with a couple of snap cap rounds. If he's flinching you'll see it clearly, and so will the shooter.

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from Pip wrote 4 years 7 min ago

Does anyone happen to know what happens if you dry fire lever guns like the Marlin 336?

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from 99explorer wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

I once owned a Marlin 336 in .30-30 cal. It failed to fire once when I tried to shoot a snake, and I took it to a gunsmith, who told me I had a broken firing pin. As I had not put more than one box of ammo through it, I can only conclude that the cause was excessive dry-firing.

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from mutt wrote 4 years 1 day ago

not a bad bit of logic. I can't think of the actual name for them but, what is your take on those "snap caps" for dry firing with?

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from seadog wrote 4 years 1 day ago

Excellent advice. Cost of ammo--$0, range fees--$0, improved accuracy--priceless!

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from ishawooa wrote 4 years 1 day ago

I like snap caps as I do not have to be concerned about anything breaking. Also, and this might be a somewhat faulty statement, it also assures me that there is not a live round in the chamber inspite of checking twice. If you have ever been around an accidental discharge you know what I mean. Some expensive double guns come with snap caps for practice.
I reinterate the caution to be exercised with dry firing older guns of all types. Some will not withstand the dry firing without snap caps. A fine example of what should have not happened but did took place with a valuable but elderly .22 semi-automatic of mine about a month ago. A friend asked to see it so I got it from the gun safe, removed the magazine, and checked to be sure it was not loaded. I handed it to him and he immediately also looked in the chamber. He apparently decided to try the trigger and pulled it before I could say anything. About a week later I took several guns out in the desert to shoot. The old .22 failed to shoot and appears to have a broken firing spring. A trip to the gunsmith will tell.

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from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 22 hours ago

What about pumps like my Rem 760? Would inserting a spent cartridge alleviate the problem in shotguns etc?

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from mihunter wrote 4 years 19 hours ago

THANK YOU! i have been telling my shooting buddies this a while now. i'll admit i thought it was stupid when i first heard about it....until i tried it. THIS HAS HELPED ME EXTREMELY!! i am twice a better shooter now. When i go to the range for about 10 mins i do this just to get into the groove.

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from Bella wrote 4 years 7 hours ago

When I teach I use snap caps too. I keep snap caps in my shotgun when it ain't in use too.

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from elmer f. wrote 4 years 7 hours ago

i would agree with that. and for the firearms that can be damaged by dry fireing, there is always the snap cap option. that is what my boy and i do for our 22 rimfires. the only problem with those cheap little peice of plastic is they dont last long if you dry fire much. personally, i would rather shoot, but we live to close to to many people to shoot. so that means a trip to the woods. dry fireing is something we can do together, sometimes even while watching tv.

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from ohiodeerhunter wrote 4 years 5 hours ago

Del in KS

Thanks for the pencil eraser idea,I'll try that one out this weekend.
Sounds logical to me,as long as the firing pin hits something,it should not be in danger of breaking the pin or spring.

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from sarg wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

One little trick I learned in the Air Force in '62 was to get in position ,sight the target then just close your eyes or look away for a second. then look at target again, If you have to pull back to your target, you will have troubl hitting especially if a second shot is required.You shouldn't have to reposition each and every shot...Especially useful fwhen shooting auto's......Did they teach you that Clay when you went through Basic?

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from focusfront wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

Sarg;

Finding your natural point of aim makes hitting much easier. Back when I could shoot and hit anything, the whole game was getting good at positions so that the sights would just naturally rest on the bullseye as you held the rifle. Beyond that and a good trigger pull, all that's left to hitting the target is wind doping. You learn the good trigger through dry firing. From the things he writes in this blog I suspect Dave is a pretty good shot.

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from wingshooter54 wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

When I was a kid my play rifle was an old, unserviceable Krag Jorgenson chambered for some obscure 6.5 cartridge; a wall-hanger that Dad allowed me to drag around. I was in hog heaven and the envy of many of my contemporaries. (couldn't you just hear the anti-gun people screaming if they had been if force back then?) I cannot tell you how many imaginary bad guys, buffalo, elephants, deer, elk and so on were in that old Krag's sights. I learned early on about two stage triggers and must have dry fired thousands upon thousands of times. Any success I have today putting the bullet where I aim whether with pistol or rifle is surely a result of those wonderful days.

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from Ozark Hunter wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

What a bucket of worms!

Snapping a firearm? From a meteorology point of view it’s not a good idea. Take two hammers and start pounding them together and see what happens. But whatever floats your cork I say. I've witnessed several broken firing pins. Military rifles can take it, but not civilian rifles.

If you’re shooting High Power, train with 22 Long Rifle. If shooting 22 Long Rifle, train with Air Rifle. I can take an Air rifle Competitor and make them a Small Bore Shooter or Small Bore Shooter to make them a High Power Shooter. But it's exceptionally difficult to do it in reverse order and that's why I had a Young Teenage Girl start with Small Bore and the following year went to the Whittington Center in June 86 for the Olympic Tryouts. If I allowed her to shoot High Power, she would’ve never made the invitation and National exposure she received.

There’s more to it than just dry firing and follow through and where the guns goes off at what point of aim does matter. Chances are, you’re out in the field and your sights are doing a figure eight on the critter. You must know when to squeeze to get the right timing down for when the trigger breaks. Personally, I like live fire at long range on fist size rocks where you get instant results!
Bottom line, the most overlooked part of shooting is about timing and follow through!

At the time of the strike of the firing pin, you will move the gun significantly enough to miss!

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from buckhunter wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

I'm wondering if the military philosophy of dry fire practice came about during the hard kicking M1 Garand era and lost some usefulness when the light kicking M16 came about?

I never dry fired at the range.

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from 86Ram wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

Dime Washer Drills & Shadow boxes also help (takes tw0 personnel)

You put a dime or washer on the muzzle of your weapon after you assume a good prone or good shooting position and dry fire your weaapon.
This helps you steady your aim as well as identifies habits (trigger pull/jerk) etc

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from 86Ram wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

idea is to keep the dime on the muzzle with out it falling off

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from Carney wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Had a guy at the range give me this same dry firing advice just yesterday. The occasion was I had just finished qualifications for position shooting. The shooting club had a few bullets leave the range so they instituted a qualification program for anyone wanting to shoot positions other than bench or compete in NRA or CMP high power competitions.

It was my first opportunity to shoot an M1. Open sights; 3 shots in each position: prone, seated and standing at both 100 & 200 yards. The spotter could only count eight holes in my 200 yard target, so I was sweating it a bit until they found the 9th hole in the X ring!!

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from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Del in Ks,
Good tip, thanks.

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from cas0905 wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

are BARs dry fireable?

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from scott powers wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

dry firing a gun can help even the best fo shoot ers but if you want to praticed even better you should get a buddy to load your gun for you. get him to put an old cace in sometimes so you dont damage the pin on the gun. also get him to put in a live round when he thinks that it is most needed.

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from Ricardo Rodríguez wrote 3 years 51 weeks ago

Two years ago we borrowed from another club an instructor for a month for rifle shooting, a cuban fellow who had been a military shooting instructor in Angola and ex olimpic shooter, who now trains shooters from kids with air guns up to Panamerican and Olimpic level ones.
He always insisted in dry firing at the wall the first 15 minutes of shooting practice to warm up, then start dry firing at paper or silhuettes, and finally use live ammo.
He also instructed us to close our eyes and open them immediately to see if our point of aim had moved, and acomodate our feet or body until it didn´t, so that our body was not subject to tension.
Another excersise he put us to do was to try to keep aiming for as long as 10 minutes before actually shooting.

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from grant77 wrote 3 years 41 weeks ago

thanks for the advice dave

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from Ozark Hunter wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

meteorology?

How about Metallurgy!

Besides, both have the same effect when a moving object come in contact with a none moving object, something gots to give!

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from Ozark Hunter wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

One of the best scores I ever shot is the day I was feeling like crap and forgot my Sudafed and Tylenol! Yep, small doses of Sudafed and other feel good drugs will make a negative impact on your shooting ability even if make you feel totally better!

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from yohan wrote 3 years 52 weeks ago

I agree with sarg and focus front and also Mike D.

To witt:

Using a plain ( no sights ) smooth bore 12 ga. Which kicked so hard it broke my nose twice, with winchester ammunition.
( later determined to be slightly under bored by a gun smith I knew pretty well) But also not as violent with Remmington slugs.

With a stock designed for pointing, too short for me in the first palce.
When I crawled the stock trying to aim it.
I got a thumb in the nose hard enough to cause minor break. Being Norwegian it took twice for that to sink in.
But as formr ( amature) boxer I know what a broken nose is,. and that combination sure as shootn broke my damn nose. Twice
By the next summer I couldnt shoot a cap gun without flinching.

So I started over,. dry fireing at first ,. then the biggest thing i shot for a month was a 22.
After which a range rat friend of mine volonteered to
hand me a rifle ( still a 22) which may or may not have a live round in the chamber.
The drill was ,.no looky,. just shooty ; )
That was very telling and went a long way to fixing the problem.
Next was 30-30 on up to 9.3 Mauser which kicks.

Which is how it became abundantly clear as to why it is waaay more important than people think ( realize) to have a stock that fits and is designed for the intended use. Dont see the need for custom stocks but for sure not one that simply does not fit.
One can absorb a lot of recoil if it isnt directed primarily at your nose ; )

What I also found was that noise ( muzzle blast) was a big factor.
Having used hearing protection for a long time
With to me no noticable diffence,. other than to protect my ear drums .
Once possessed of the evil flinch,. hearing protection was also a major factor in retraining the brain.

So now Im back to normal,.what ever that is.
Probbaly for me , a state of mind that says
Well Yohan,. you own guns that will very likley shoot better than you can shoot em.
But as long as your shooting within your personal limits (mine is 200 yds and very occasionally slightly more 250 or so ) without incurring facial injury allowing you cleanly humainly kill ( an oxymoron in itslef ) that which you detemine is appropriate table fair in a reasonable and sportsman like manor then you can take your place in the hunting woods.

My criteria by the way is not so much distance,.
its three inches,.
I know I can get most shots to stay with three inches at 200 yds and that is my benchmark optimal limit.
I have had a guide or two queston that .
With my polite respose being this or words to ths effect.
.
Once long ago and far away on a distant plant called northern Wisconsin. Which aint nowhere ,.. but next door to nowhere.
I killed a deer very very badly,. and those images still haunt me ,. I also had to shoot a
"bad mean a$$ dog" which I was too young to do, and I didnt do that well either.
I do not like thinking of either,. butI do.
Thusly ,. since im the guy paying for the trip, maybe I
should be the guy deciding how far I should shoot.
So I dont have to make anymore bad memories.
Trth is Im OK out to about 300
But,.. if you say that then they want you to shoot 350 and unlesits almost straight down I aint gonna do that.

By the by ,. hearing more and more about shooting things like deer moose sheep etc. located in the adjacent zip code. I must be out of touch
Can anyone tell me aside from the 50 cal class ,.
what these guys are using ?
and how much the guns weigh? an what kind of glass are they using ?

And one other thing
I have friends and aquainteces from all over. Some in Norway not many in Swededn : ) and a few other countries

Recenlty I was having a friendly chat with
a German woman ( from Germany) who is not a hunter but is an occasional shooter. She likes to punch papaer with light cal guns. Tell ya what ,she can puch my paper any time she wants YUK YUK
This individual actually admires those who hunt "if its done it classy respectful manor" ( not my words hers)
And get this fellow bloggers,she ( and she says ) many of her European contemopraris (both men and women) view hunting as an honorable classic activity considered more of an "individual calling ".than the some times "group slaughter" attitude that she here's of here.
Respected for honoring the sport they pursue as well as the gane they take, large or small no ganme is wasted .
Hunters there are viewd diferntly ??

She went furher to say that many ,.( most ) of the hunters men a nad women she knew in Germany.
Were also exellent cooks. and that to be invited to a wild game dinner was considerd something of an honor and rather big deal.

She went on to allude to the fact that
a bunch of ya-hoo's hi 5-ing and swilling bear over that which they have just killed,gives fuel and ammunition to the anti's. Interesting thought ,.is it not ??

Also while she readily admits the land of the free and the home of the brave together with Alied forces kicked her coutries ass to and for the betterment of the world. While the Us affords many many more opportunities than in Europe. The use and treatment of game is very casual in te use.

Her take is that the ant-hunting contingent would be weakened considernbly and quickly
If in fact we adjusted our outward behavior which would affect greatly percived attitudes of those who do not hunt.
Her futher words were,. "like all things 10% ( slob huntes) can ruin it or make it redicioulsy hard for the 90 % who are honoranble well intended hunters and sportsmen & women.

I came away from that conversation with a different perspective.

Hope yall have a good sunday,.

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from Ozark Hunter wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

Dry firing?

Dar He was!

Nice 7/8 curl Ram at 300 yards!

Gun went click!

Cycled the bolt, CLICK!

His buddy who already limited out handed him his gun, BOOM!

They remover the bolt and the firing pin fractured from dry firing.

What really sucked, he shot his once in a lifetime trophy with someone elses rifle!

If that what blows your kilt up doing dry firing? Go for it, just better hope you have a backup rifle and a second chance tomorrow!!

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from Ozark Hunter wrote 3 years 50 weeks ago

Ricardo Rodríguez

Another excersise he put us to do was to try to keep aiming for as long as 10 minutes before actually shooting?

Not a good idea! Look at the clock on the wall for even one minute then look to the side. What do you see!

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from Ricardo Rodríguez wrote 3 years 48 weeks ago

Ozark Hunter,
I didn´t mention it , but that was aiming at the actual target, or in this case, silhuete. The excersise was in steps, first one minute, then 3, 5, and finnally 10. The purpose was to build up pulse steadyness and concentration. If we got tired could rest a little, stretch and reassume standing position. When time was up, he give us the fire command and we started shooting.

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from New Age Bubba wrote 2 years 33 weeks ago

Don't try this with your expensive spring powered pellet guns!

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