Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

How to Hunt for Years on $2,000: The Optics

Recent Comments

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Syndicate

Google Reader or Homepage
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My AOL

Whitetail 365
in your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

August 26, 2013

How to Hunt for Years on $2,000: The Optics

By Dave Hurteau

In case you missed the first (click here) or second (click here) installment, I’ll point out again that the September-issue cover story “Deer Hunting in the Real World” included a large sidebar called “Hunt for Years on $2,000,” featuring 12 essential deer-hunting items totaling under $2K, each of which are either very good or shockingly good for the price.  The print edition included only a list. So here’s a bit more info. Last week I detailed guns, bows, treestands, and climbing sticks. Now for the optics.

The Bino: Bushnell Legacy WP 8x42

If in these rotten economic times your financial situation precludes your spending even $100 on binos, do not despair—at least not over the prospect of having to look through dreadful glass. Bushnell’s Legacy porros are fully multicoated with a BaK-4 prism, 100-percent waterproof and fogproof, and rubber-armored for $75. That’s right, $75! Are they great? Of course not. Are they a little bulky? Yes, yes. But, they are outrageously good for the money. Nothing I’ve seen at this price comes close.

MSRP: $75; bushnell.com

The Rangefinder: Simmons LRF 600

Last year, in a test of bargain rangefinders for the magazine’s Field Test section, the LRF 600 scored well for accuracy, target acquisition, optical quality, and overall performance. The author, Steven Hill wrote: “This unit performed reliably to 150 yards but faltered at 200, its advertised maximum distance for deer. [It reads larger reflective targets—rocks, trees, hillsides—to 600.] Decent optics and a generous rectangular reticle make it easy to aim. No angle compensation is a minus that’s made up for by the very low price. Overall, it’s a solid no-frills package.”

The real kicker: I’ve seen it on sale online for under $100.

MSRP: $222, street price about $100; simmonsoptics.com

The Scope: Redfield Revolution 3-9x40

I have not personally looked through this scope, but unabashed glass-snob David E. Petzal has and calls it “a simple, tough, American-made scope with very good glass for the price.” That should be recommendation enough.

MSRP: $250, street price $195; redfield.com

 

Comments (1)

Top Rated
All Comments
from fordman155 wrote 33 weeks 3 days ago

The Redfield Revolution is a dead-on GREAT buy. I have two of them on magnum caliber rifles and they hold their settings w/o a doubt. Last year, my back up rifle fell over right before I left the house on the opening day of deer season. The scope took most of the impact. A few days later I had the change to check the settings and they were exactly the same as before the fall. The holdover points are much like those on the Leupold Long Range reticle, but that's no surprise as they're made by the same company.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from fordman155 wrote 33 weeks 3 days ago

The Redfield Revolution is a dead-on GREAT buy. I have two of them on magnum caliber rifles and they hold their settings w/o a doubt. Last year, my back up rifle fell over right before I left the house on the opening day of deer season. The scope took most of the impact. A few days later I had the change to check the settings and they were exactly the same as before the fall. The holdover points are much like those on the Leupold Long Range reticle, but that's no surprise as they're made by the same company.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment