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Rifles

how often do you clean your guns?

Uploaded on March 09, 2009

So i read in another post that some people dont clean their guns except maybe once or twice during the season. I myself clean my rifle as soon as we get home. We usually go every weekend then when we go back home, if i shot it or had foul weather ill clean it. So at the most maybe 5 shots before i clean it, thats if i shoot at every sitting morning and afternoon. Which i think has happened.... never. So how often do you clean yours?

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from kolbster wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

after every time i shoot them, and before the season.

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from Carney wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

When they need it -- or when I need it. It's kind of therapeutic!

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from NolanOsborne wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

As soon as i get home.
if i go shoot clays, i may put 100+ through it that day, but always gets cleaned when i get home

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rabbitpolice88 wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

I clean my guns as needed. Some of my guns shoot better with a little fouling down the barrel. Each of my guns is on it's own cleaning schedule.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

I try to clean my centerfire rifles and sidearms after each use. On a lengthy target session, I clean at the bench. If too much time passes between practice sessions with a particular firearm, I inspect and clean it. I agree with Carney; it's a productive use of quiet time to routinely inspect and clean the firearms, or something to do while watching a mildly interesting TV program. I do not clean my Ruger .22 rimfire autoloader after each firing, but that one is normally fired weekly.

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from jmeerpohl wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

I clean (using bore cleaner, compressed air for action, some light lubricant for insides, etc) when I know I will store for over 2 months before the next shooting session. I wipe down after each use with balisstol impregnated cloth since it helps take finger acid, handling dirt, etc. of bluing/stainless and does not harm wood. I run a bore snake dry, through after every ten or so shots and store muzzles down on a carpeted foor in my safes, with either a snap cap in chamber or deactuated firing pin position. Seems to work ok after 40 years of collecting and shooting.

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from shane wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

Almost every time I shoot them. There are some guns that I feel will be ok if I let them stay dirty for a few days, and there are some that I rush home, immediately to the operating table every time.

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from handicappedhunter wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

i clean mine after each shooting to easier to keep the lead and copper out just makes it nice to know its really clean

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from handicappedhunter wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

i clean mine after each shooting to easier to keep the lead and copper out just makes it nice to know its really clean

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

I clean my good guns after each use. I do however have several guns that can go several weeks before cleaning. Mainly my rabbit and squirrel guns.

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from jmeerpohl wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

HH must have a stutter as his handicap. What cruek\l person used the phonetic challenge word Lisp to describe that issue.

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from buckeye wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

I clean mine after every use except my slug gun I will not clean it between siting it in and hunting but i do clean it after gun season is over.

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from BromleyTriple7 wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

Well, if its not during any major season ill shoot and clean the same day, im talkin pretty much dissasembling the entire gun. However, if its in season ill sight in and not touch the bore untill the season is over unless i put it through a rain or snow storm. most of the time though when i hunt ill wipe down any exposed metal with some Rem Oil

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WestGaHunter wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

I'm nearly convinced that I shouldn't post among such an obsessively clean crowd, but someone with dirty guns needs to bare their soul.
Once a season, I clean my rifles that need some fouling to shoot straight ... they get a good work-out from September til early January. I can already hear the wincing in this crowd.
Shot of Hoppes, please. In a dirty glass with a chipped rim.
I clean the safe queens with greater regularity, but I admonish my buddies (one in particular) about cleaning too often and scoring up crowns and burnishing chambers.
No ... I don't have some tale from a famous barrel-maker, but I do know that well-made guns from the major manufacturers will last five generations with a wee bit of care.
When I do clean, I do it with great zeal. I swab with a powder solvent, then brush with a copper cleaner and wait before sending countless patches to look for blue. And sometimes I use JB bore paste if I feel tightness or if the patches start to catch on something. And finally, I damp patch with just a splash of Kroil and for the safe queens, a little CLP before storage. Whew ... and that's why I don't clean 'em more often. BTW, the sporting guns seem to love a bit of grim (not rust, mind you) and groups actually shrink with more ammo sent down range.
And the queens ... well they're queens; they just hanker for a little attention now and again. Bow, curtsy, damp patch and kiss on the cheekpiece.
Now, I feel cleansed after sharing; nearly as clean as my go-to .30-30.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from jmeerpohl wrote 5 years 2 weeks ago

WHEN I DETECT AN ISSUE WITH COPPER FOULING, I TAKE THE ACTION OUT OF THE FIREARM, USE ONE OF MY LEFT OVER SQUEZZE EAR PLUGS (I TEACH HUNTER ED SO WE GET A LOT OF THOSE LEFT BEHIND), STOP UP THE BARREL WITH TE EAR PLUG, THEN POUR ENOUGH HOUSEHOLD AMMONIA INTO THE BARREL TO GET TO THE BREECH AND HANG IT BY A WIRE IN THE GARAGE OVERNIGHT TO LET IT SOAK AND LEAN OUT THE COPPER. I PULL THE PLUG THE NEXT DAY OVER A HOUSEHOLD BUCKET, EARLY ENOUGH TO SEE IF THE AMMONIA IS GETTING RESULTS AND DEPENDENT UPON HOW BLUE THE AMMONIA SOLUTION HAS BECOME, THEN VIOROUSLY CLEAN OUT THE BARRLE WITH ISO ALCOHOL, PATCHES OVER WIRE BRUSH, ETC, TO GET OUT REAMING COPPER FOULING. THE ISO ALCOHOL TREATMENT IS KEY, SINCE AMMONIA LEFT TO ITS OWN MEANS WILL DO SOME SERIOUS DAMAGE TO THE METAL INSIDE THE BARREL WHEN EXPOSED TO O2. SO YOU NEED TO GET THAT STUFF OUT. NO FANCY COPPER CLEANERS, JUST A LITTLE UNDERSTANDING OF CHEMISTRY AND METALURGY TO GET A REALLY CLEAN BARREL ON THE CHEAP. THE LAST STEP IS TO APPLY SOME LUBRICTION FLUID (AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION FLUID IS REALLY GOOD LUBRICNAT FRO LONG TERM STORAGE)TO DISPLACE THE ISO ALCOHOL. THEN AT THE RANGE THE FIRST COUPLE OF SHOTS WILL "CLEANSE"THE BAREL OF THE LUBE AND AWAY YOU GO FOR SIGHTING IN OR SHOOTING STRINGS.

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from Jim in Mo wrote 5 years 2 weeks ago

Depends how much I've shot it. I wipe the outside and chamber area each time. As for the bore, a swipe of Hoppe's each 20 rounds. A bore brush doesn't go in until 100 rounds. Copper cleaning doesn't happen until groups open up a bit, ususally each year or two. Most bores shoot the best a tad fouled. If your talking about a 22RF I never clean the bore. That is, never clean with a brush. It will ruin the groups you've worked hard to establish. At best, occasionally run a patch of Hoppe's #9 down the bore only if you think moisture or dust got in. Otherwise leave the bore alone.

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from Jim in Mo wrote 5 years 2 weeks ago

jmeerpohl,
With respect, I totally disagree with you. Ammonia is very harmful to barrels. If and when you use it, clean and get that stuff out! And, without a degree in chemistry I'll avoid transmission fluid to disperse the ammonia, don't do things on the cheap, it ends up costing more. Drying with clean patches and using Hoppes 9 afterwards will do just fine, and a tad of lubrication.
Here is a safe and useful method for cleaning a bad barrel. Once I got an old abused gun. The barrel was corroded, fouled and signs of rust in the bore. Using the method you described I used a 50/50 mixture of Krohl penetrating oil and Hoppes9. And as you said let it soak 24 hours. Drained and thoroughly cleaned it afterwards.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from rippja wrote 5 years 2 weeks ago

I clean my guns every time i shoot them and sometimes when im mad at other things, good way to concentrate on something else.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BuckTheSystem wrote 5 years 2 weeks ago

After every trip/shooting outing. For the guns I have not shot in a while, they get a wipe down every couple of months.

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from BuckTheSystem wrote 5 years 1 week ago

My carry gun needs to be cleaned regularly regardless of if it has been fired. It picks up a lot of lint and dust being concealed, so I take it apart and clean/lube often. If my deer rifle goes click instead of bang that's one thing, but if my personal defense weapon goes click or jams up, that is a whole different story.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from 870 wingmaster 101 wrote 5 years 1 week ago

I clean every gun I own after each time of use, unless I only shoot a few times.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from HAMMER33 wrote 5 years 1 week ago

I clean my rifles and pistols after each use. If we are upland bird hunting and there is no foul weather, the shotgun may go the whole weekend.

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from skippyjohnson wrote 5 years 4 days ago

I clean the shotguns once a season - exceptions for serious rain / snow. The big rifles get cleaned after the pre-hunt range and then again at the end of the season. The handguns get cleaned after every shooting trip. The plinkers rarely get cleaned. The varmint rifles (.17 HMR, .22 mag, and .223) get cleaned after every trip.

When I go shooting with my son, we clean all the guns we shot within a day or two. It's a another good chance to practice safe handling of guns and teach him how the different guns work.

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from hunterkid94 wrote 4 years 52 weeks ago

everytime i use em

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from setup wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

After every use!
The safe queens..at least once a year......more if I need some therapy or have a lust for the scent of Hoppes!

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from rocky d bashaw wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

regularly, during deer season i only use dry patch, after the season i will break down and clean good.

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from WestGaHunter wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Jim in MO,
I like your Kroil mixture, and it reminded me of a borrowed concoction that I use.
I like the old Ed's Red formula, too for bore swabbing over a few hours or days. That stuff seems to penetrate well and lossen grim that even brushes don't faze.
I made a batch of it several years ago from that Internet recipe and ended up with nearly a gallon ... after years of giving friends an ounce or two here and there, I still have plenty left.
BTW, for all my light oil purposes, I like Mobil 1 0W5. Can't beat the price.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

After every hunt rifles get cleaned with Hoppe's No 9 Benchrest for corrosion protection. Barnes CR-10 after a shooting session at the range. Shotguns get wiped and oiled after daily use. Deep cleaned about every 2 weeks unless they get soaking wet, which is almost every weekend during duck and goose season. Break Free for the shotguns. Rem Oil for the rifles.

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

I clean my guns after each trip from the field; regardless if I fire them off or not.
I surface wipe them down at least monthly during the off season.
Hoppes#9, and REM oil are the usual cleaners while I also have some S&W gun oil I have recently began using. Good Stuff I would say worth trying.

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from BigWoodsHunter57 wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

After everytime I get done shooting I will usually clean out the action and polish up the metal pieces that I touch to avoid rusting. During hunting season I try to avoid cleaning with any oils or chemicals due to the smells that will stick on my rifle. However, if I am hunting in foul weather, I always will polish up my gun when done hunting for the day to avoid rusting. Take care of your rifle and your rifle will take care of you...

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from 270WSM wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Each time I shoot my deer guns and at the end of the season. The plinkers maybe every 150-200 shots.

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from brw7979 wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

After every use, and when I just feel like doing it. I love working with my guns and making sure there in good shape and work properly.

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from Hunt_Hard wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

I clean my guns probably 4-6 times a year. I probably don't shoot as much as most, I sight in my guns once a year and shoot an animal or two with each gun so cleaning isn't really needed that often in my opinion.

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from 788Ham wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

I clean my rifles/handguns every time they're used, especially the .223 that get used quite a bit. I use Hoppes to get the powder and other gunk out, then use Kroil and leave it set for an hr. or so, then brush it and dry swab it out. I give each bore a light coat of Kroil before going into the safe.
I guess in some ways I'm like Carney, I find it therapeutic to clean the firearms, just to think of times in the field, or whatever. On another web-site, I saw a guy that has some VERY nice looking rifles, I inquired as to what he uses to make them this way. Renissance Wax! I contacted the company that makes the wax, bought some, and have spent some long hours attempting to make mine like this other gentleman's. Yes, I can hear the groans now! LOL Seriously, this stuff makes those rifle in the cupboard look better than brand new. I noticed on an older rifle, Savage '99 .300, the bluing on the barrel looked kinda flat, took some Flitz and cleaned the rust {not flaky rust} off, then when I applied the RW, that old barrel shined like a diamond in a goat's butt. I spent probably 5 hrs. applying the RW to the stock, and other metal on the .300, and rubbing and rubbing the finish. A week later, my younger brother saw this old rifle, our Pop's rifle since 1947, he wouldn't believe it was the same gun! I've spent some long hours in the "powder locker" shining up the arms I own, another classic I own is another Savage '99 in .250/3000, that ol' gal really shines now! I know some will think I don't have any time but for cleaning and shining, but when I do take these guns out, no matter the weather, and not to worry if it snows or rains on them.

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from jtboles wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I clean my guns after we go shooting each and every time and if they sit in the case without seeing action for extended amounts of time then ill give them a quick rub down with some rem oil.

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from dibsandrew wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I clean my barrels each time I shoot, but I rarely use any solvent other than Rem Oil or CLP and most of the time I just use a boresnake for my shotguns. I clean and oil the steel parts whenever they get wet. I clean actions when I am bored.

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from senderomike wrote 4 years 16 weeks ago

No.9 till it starts to foul
Sweets 7.62 when copper fouling is detected followed by Hoppes No.9

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from environmentally... wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

Every time I shoot.

Use WeaponCLP www.CenterfireCS.com

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from dukkillr wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

Every 40-60 rounds or so in my centerfire rifles. In my shotguns I just run a Boresnake through after each shooting session.

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from Crazyhunter wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

Every time I take it out hunting or shoot it at ALL. Increases gun life.

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from Crazyhunter wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

P.S Get a bore snake. There Easy.

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from jtboles wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

if i pull the trigger two or more times it gets cleaned, and then if it is a shotgun it gets pulled apart twice a year for the thurow cleaning

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from cas0905 wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

during season not as much but normally i clean after every shooting i am poor and cannot afford to replace my guns plus i kinda like them and by kinda like i mean love them

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from woodsmanj35 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

I clean them when they need it. for my 22 that's every couple bricks. for my muzzle loader that's every time I shoot. It really depends on the gun.

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from jmeerpohl wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Hoppes is fine for cleaning nitro-cellulose powder residue. It does not touch copper in my expereince. Ammonia is tough on all metals if left long enough to turn into the salt it forms eventually,but if nyou are truly cleaning your firearm, and want to remove copper fouling you need an an hydrous (smell the factory concoctions some time and tell me you can't smell the NH4 in the stuff). ISO Alcohol is a wonderful cleaning agent, the universal solvent, and it is volatile enough to dry out the barrel as well. If you want to get the copper out you will be using some fluid that has ammonia in it, to dissolve the copper. Then clean out the NH4 with Iso Alcohol, and after that a stable lubricant. ATF is about as stable as they get, heat, pressure,etc really does not affect the stuff and its is readily available. I try not to junk u[p my closet with anything that is single purposed if another equally as effective item will do the job, and a lot less expensive in bulk quantities. not just cheap but effective and safe if you follow steps without getting distracted to another project.

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from chuckles wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Muzzleloaders get cleaned asap after shooting.
Centerfire rifles after shooting or at the end of the season after pre-season sight in. (unless hunting in rain or snow then I disassemble and wipe down but only run a dry bore snake down the barrel.)
.22 once or twice a year or if starts shooting wild.
.17hmr after shooting
Shotguns after shooting get the dry bore snake plus one good cleaning/yr to get out plastic fouling.
I don't clean for copper unless the gun starts shooting poorly, I use Barnes for most of my centerfires and they can be sensitive to excess copper fouling.

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from Carney wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

When they need it -- or when I need it. It's kind of therapeutic!

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from WestGaHunter wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

I'm nearly convinced that I shouldn't post among such an obsessively clean crowd, but someone with dirty guns needs to bare their soul.
Once a season, I clean my rifles that need some fouling to shoot straight ... they get a good work-out from September til early January. I can already hear the wincing in this crowd.
Shot of Hoppes, please. In a dirty glass with a chipped rim.
I clean the safe queens with greater regularity, but I admonish my buddies (one in particular) about cleaning too often and scoring up crowns and burnishing chambers.
No ... I don't have some tale from a famous barrel-maker, but I do know that well-made guns from the major manufacturers will last five generations with a wee bit of care.
When I do clean, I do it with great zeal. I swab with a powder solvent, then brush with a copper cleaner and wait before sending countless patches to look for blue. And sometimes I use JB bore paste if I feel tightness or if the patches start to catch on something. And finally, I damp patch with just a splash of Kroil and for the safe queens, a little CLP before storage. Whew ... and that's why I don't clean 'em more often. BTW, the sporting guns seem to love a bit of grim (not rust, mind you) and groups actually shrink with more ammo sent down range.
And the queens ... well they're queens; they just hanker for a little attention now and again. Bow, curtsy, damp patch and kiss on the cheekpiece.
Now, I feel cleansed after sharing; nearly as clean as my go-to .30-30.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 5 years 2 weeks ago

jmeerpohl,
With respect, I totally disagree with you. Ammonia is very harmful to barrels. If and when you use it, clean and get that stuff out! And, without a degree in chemistry I'll avoid transmission fluid to disperse the ammonia, don't do things on the cheap, it ends up costing more. Drying with clean patches and using Hoppes 9 afterwards will do just fine, and a tad of lubrication.
Here is a safe and useful method for cleaning a bad barrel. Once I got an old abused gun. The barrel was corroded, fouled and signs of rust in the bore. Using the method you described I used a 50/50 mixture of Krohl penetrating oil and Hoppes9. And as you said let it soak 24 hours. Drained and thoroughly cleaned it afterwards.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from BuckTheSystem wrote 5 years 1 week ago

My carry gun needs to be cleaned regularly regardless of if it has been fired. It picks up a lot of lint and dust being concealed, so I take it apart and clean/lube often. If my deer rifle goes click instead of bang that's one thing, but if my personal defense weapon goes click or jams up, that is a whole different story.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edward J. Palumbo wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

I try to clean my centerfire rifles and sidearms after each use. On a lengthy target session, I clean at the bench. If too much time passes between practice sessions with a particular firearm, I inspect and clean it. I agree with Carney; it's a productive use of quiet time to routinely inspect and clean the firearms, or something to do while watching a mildly interesting TV program. I do not clean my Ruger .22 rimfire autoloader after each firing, but that one is normally fired weekly.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

Almost every time I shoot them. There are some guns that I feel will be ok if I let them stay dirty for a few days, and there are some that I rush home, immediately to the operating table every time.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from setup wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

After every use!
The safe queens..at least once a year......more if I need some therapy or have a lust for the scent of Hoppes!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from kolbster wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

after every time i shoot them, and before the season.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from NolanOsborne wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

As soon as i get home.
if i go shoot clays, i may put 100+ through it that day, but always gets cleaned when i get home

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rabbitpolice88 wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

I clean my guns as needed. Some of my guns shoot better with a little fouling down the barrel. Each of my guns is on it's own cleaning schedule.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jmeerpohl wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

I clean (using bore cleaner, compressed air for action, some light lubricant for insides, etc) when I know I will store for over 2 months before the next shooting session. I wipe down after each use with balisstol impregnated cloth since it helps take finger acid, handling dirt, etc. of bluing/stainless and does not harm wood. I run a bore snake dry, through after every ten or so shots and store muzzles down on a carpeted foor in my safes, with either a snap cap in chamber or deactuated firing pin position. Seems to work ok after 40 years of collecting and shooting.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from handicappedhunter wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

i clean mine after each shooting to easier to keep the lead and copper out just makes it nice to know its really clean

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from handicappedhunter wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

i clean mine after each shooting to easier to keep the lead and copper out just makes it nice to know its really clean

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

I clean my good guns after each use. I do however have several guns that can go several weeks before cleaning. Mainly my rabbit and squirrel guns.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jmeerpohl wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

HH must have a stutter as his handicap. What cruek\l person used the phonetic challenge word Lisp to describe that issue.

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from buckeye wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

I clean mine after every use except my slug gun I will not clean it between siting it in and hunting but i do clean it after gun season is over.

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from BromleyTriple7 wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

Well, if its not during any major season ill shoot and clean the same day, im talkin pretty much dissasembling the entire gun. However, if its in season ill sight in and not touch the bore untill the season is over unless i put it through a rain or snow storm. most of the time though when i hunt ill wipe down any exposed metal with some Rem Oil

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jmeerpohl wrote 5 years 2 weeks ago

WHEN I DETECT AN ISSUE WITH COPPER FOULING, I TAKE THE ACTION OUT OF THE FIREARM, USE ONE OF MY LEFT OVER SQUEZZE EAR PLUGS (I TEACH HUNTER ED SO WE GET A LOT OF THOSE LEFT BEHIND), STOP UP THE BARREL WITH TE EAR PLUG, THEN POUR ENOUGH HOUSEHOLD AMMONIA INTO THE BARREL TO GET TO THE BREECH AND HANG IT BY A WIRE IN THE GARAGE OVERNIGHT TO LET IT SOAK AND LEAN OUT THE COPPER. I PULL THE PLUG THE NEXT DAY OVER A HOUSEHOLD BUCKET, EARLY ENOUGH TO SEE IF THE AMMONIA IS GETTING RESULTS AND DEPENDENT UPON HOW BLUE THE AMMONIA SOLUTION HAS BECOME, THEN VIOROUSLY CLEAN OUT THE BARRLE WITH ISO ALCOHOL, PATCHES OVER WIRE BRUSH, ETC, TO GET OUT REAMING COPPER FOULING. THE ISO ALCOHOL TREATMENT IS KEY, SINCE AMMONIA LEFT TO ITS OWN MEANS WILL DO SOME SERIOUS DAMAGE TO THE METAL INSIDE THE BARREL WHEN EXPOSED TO O2. SO YOU NEED TO GET THAT STUFF OUT. NO FANCY COPPER CLEANERS, JUST A LITTLE UNDERSTANDING OF CHEMISTRY AND METALURGY TO GET A REALLY CLEAN BARREL ON THE CHEAP. THE LAST STEP IS TO APPLY SOME LUBRICTION FLUID (AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION FLUID IS REALLY GOOD LUBRICNAT FRO LONG TERM STORAGE)TO DISPLACE THE ISO ALCOHOL. THEN AT THE RANGE THE FIRST COUPLE OF SHOTS WILL "CLEANSE"THE BAREL OF THE LUBE AND AWAY YOU GO FOR SIGHTING IN OR SHOOTING STRINGS.

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from Jim in Mo wrote 5 years 2 weeks ago

Depends how much I've shot it. I wipe the outside and chamber area each time. As for the bore, a swipe of Hoppe's each 20 rounds. A bore brush doesn't go in until 100 rounds. Copper cleaning doesn't happen until groups open up a bit, ususally each year or two. Most bores shoot the best a tad fouled. If your talking about a 22RF I never clean the bore. That is, never clean with a brush. It will ruin the groups you've worked hard to establish. At best, occasionally run a patch of Hoppe's #9 down the bore only if you think moisture or dust got in. Otherwise leave the bore alone.

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from rippja wrote 5 years 2 weeks ago

I clean my guns every time i shoot them and sometimes when im mad at other things, good way to concentrate on something else.

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from BuckTheSystem wrote 5 years 2 weeks ago

After every trip/shooting outing. For the guns I have not shot in a while, they get a wipe down every couple of months.

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from 870 wingmaster 101 wrote 5 years 1 week ago

I clean every gun I own after each time of use, unless I only shoot a few times.

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from HAMMER33 wrote 5 years 1 week ago

I clean my rifles and pistols after each use. If we are upland bird hunting and there is no foul weather, the shotgun may go the whole weekend.

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from skippyjohnson wrote 5 years 4 days ago

I clean the shotguns once a season - exceptions for serious rain / snow. The big rifles get cleaned after the pre-hunt range and then again at the end of the season. The handguns get cleaned after every shooting trip. The plinkers rarely get cleaned. The varmint rifles (.17 HMR, .22 mag, and .223) get cleaned after every trip.

When I go shooting with my son, we clean all the guns we shot within a day or two. It's a another good chance to practice safe handling of guns and teach him how the different guns work.

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from hunterkid94 wrote 4 years 52 weeks ago

everytime i use em

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from rocky d bashaw wrote 4 years 50 weeks ago

regularly, during deer season i only use dry patch, after the season i will break down and clean good.

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from WestGaHunter wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Jim in MO,
I like your Kroil mixture, and it reminded me of a borrowed concoction that I use.
I like the old Ed's Red formula, too for bore swabbing over a few hours or days. That stuff seems to penetrate well and lossen grim that even brushes don't faze.
I made a batch of it several years ago from that Internet recipe and ended up with nearly a gallon ... after years of giving friends an ounce or two here and there, I still have plenty left.
BTW, for all my light oil purposes, I like Mobil 1 0W5. Can't beat the price.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

After every hunt rifles get cleaned with Hoppe's No 9 Benchrest for corrosion protection. Barnes CR-10 after a shooting session at the range. Shotguns get wiped and oiled after daily use. Deep cleaned about every 2 weeks unless they get soaking wet, which is almost every weekend during duck and goose season. Break Free for the shotguns. Rem Oil for the rifles.

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

I clean my guns after each trip from the field; regardless if I fire them off or not.
I surface wipe them down at least monthly during the off season.
Hoppes#9, and REM oil are the usual cleaners while I also have some S&W gun oil I have recently began using. Good Stuff I would say worth trying.

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from BigWoodsHunter57 wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

After everytime I get done shooting I will usually clean out the action and polish up the metal pieces that I touch to avoid rusting. During hunting season I try to avoid cleaning with any oils or chemicals due to the smells that will stick on my rifle. However, if I am hunting in foul weather, I always will polish up my gun when done hunting for the day to avoid rusting. Take care of your rifle and your rifle will take care of you...

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from 270WSM wrote 4 years 39 weeks ago

Each time I shoot my deer guns and at the end of the season. The plinkers maybe every 150-200 shots.

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from brw7979 wrote 4 years 30 weeks ago

After every use, and when I just feel like doing it. I love working with my guns and making sure there in good shape and work properly.

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from Hunt_Hard wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

I clean my guns probably 4-6 times a year. I probably don't shoot as much as most, I sight in my guns once a year and shoot an animal or two with each gun so cleaning isn't really needed that often in my opinion.

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from 788Ham wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

I clean my rifles/handguns every time they're used, especially the .223 that get used quite a bit. I use Hoppes to get the powder and other gunk out, then use Kroil and leave it set for an hr. or so, then brush it and dry swab it out. I give each bore a light coat of Kroil before going into the safe.
I guess in some ways I'm like Carney, I find it therapeutic to clean the firearms, just to think of times in the field, or whatever. On another web-site, I saw a guy that has some VERY nice looking rifles, I inquired as to what he uses to make them this way. Renissance Wax! I contacted the company that makes the wax, bought some, and have spent some long hours attempting to make mine like this other gentleman's. Yes, I can hear the groans now! LOL Seriously, this stuff makes those rifle in the cupboard look better than brand new. I noticed on an older rifle, Savage '99 .300, the bluing on the barrel looked kinda flat, took some Flitz and cleaned the rust {not flaky rust} off, then when I applied the RW, that old barrel shined like a diamond in a goat's butt. I spent probably 5 hrs. applying the RW to the stock, and other metal on the .300, and rubbing and rubbing the finish. A week later, my younger brother saw this old rifle, our Pop's rifle since 1947, he wouldn't believe it was the same gun! I've spent some long hours in the "powder locker" shining up the arms I own, another classic I own is another Savage '99 in .250/3000, that ol' gal really shines now! I know some will think I don't have any time but for cleaning and shining, but when I do take these guns out, no matter the weather, and not to worry if it snows or rains on them.

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from jtboles wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

I clean my guns after we go shooting each and every time and if they sit in the case without seeing action for extended amounts of time then ill give them a quick rub down with some rem oil.

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from dukkillr wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

Every 40-60 rounds or so in my centerfire rifles. In my shotguns I just run a Boresnake through after each shooting session.

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from woodsmanj35 wrote 3 years 47 weeks ago

I clean them when they need it. for my 22 that's every couple bricks. for my muzzle loader that's every time I shoot. It really depends on the gun.

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from dibsandrew wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I clean my barrels each time I shoot, but I rarely use any solvent other than Rem Oil or CLP and most of the time I just use a boresnake for my shotguns. I clean and oil the steel parts whenever they get wet. I clean actions when I am bored.

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from senderomike wrote 4 years 16 weeks ago

No.9 till it starts to foul
Sweets 7.62 when copper fouling is detected followed by Hoppes No.9

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from environmentally... wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

Every time I shoot.

Use WeaponCLP www.CenterfireCS.com

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from Crazyhunter wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

Every time I take it out hunting or shoot it at ALL. Increases gun life.

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from Crazyhunter wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

P.S Get a bore snake. There Easy.

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from jtboles wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

if i pull the trigger two or more times it gets cleaned, and then if it is a shotgun it gets pulled apart twice a year for the thurow cleaning

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from cas0905 wrote 4 years 9 weeks ago

during season not as much but normally i clean after every shooting i am poor and cannot afford to replace my guns plus i kinda like them and by kinda like i mean love them

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from jmeerpohl wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Hoppes is fine for cleaning nitro-cellulose powder residue. It does not touch copper in my expereince. Ammonia is tough on all metals if left long enough to turn into the salt it forms eventually,but if nyou are truly cleaning your firearm, and want to remove copper fouling you need an an hydrous (smell the factory concoctions some time and tell me you can't smell the NH4 in the stuff). ISO Alcohol is a wonderful cleaning agent, the universal solvent, and it is volatile enough to dry out the barrel as well. If you want to get the copper out you will be using some fluid that has ammonia in it, to dissolve the copper. Then clean out the NH4 with Iso Alcohol, and after that a stable lubricant. ATF is about as stable as they get, heat, pressure,etc really does not affect the stuff and its is readily available. I try not to junk u[p my closet with anything that is single purposed if another equally as effective item will do the job, and a lot less expensive in bulk quantities. not just cheap but effective and safe if you follow steps without getting distracted to another project.

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from chuckles wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Muzzleloaders get cleaned asap after shooting.
Centerfire rifles after shooting or at the end of the season after pre-season sight in. (unless hunting in rain or snow then I disassemble and wipe down but only run a dry bore snake down the barrel.)
.22 once or twice a year or if starts shooting wild.
.17hmr after shooting
Shotguns after shooting get the dry bore snake plus one good cleaning/yr to get out plastic fouling.
I don't clean for copper unless the gun starts shooting poorly, I use Barnes for most of my centerfires and they can be sensitive to excess copper fouling.

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