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Bird Hunting

Shouldering a shotgun

Uploaded on December 26, 2009

I am wondering if anyone has any gunsmith work, because my father purchased me a fausti stefano over under for christmas.(I was surprised he did this without consulting me because how would he know i liked it if i have not shouldered it) When i shouldered it for the first time It was terrible. We went and shot a single round of sporting clays i shot a 23.... Coming off a 44 and a 46 with my previous shotgun. But i was wondering if there is a way to put something in the butt of the gun so my eye sight can be right down the barrel not down at it?

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from matt wasson wrote 4 years 15 weeks ago

dont know..how about just continue to practice shooting and see if it grows on ya.. be thankful your dad buys you guns, that stopped after 13yrs old in our family..after you got your one and only single shot 12gage!

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 15 weeks ago

Had the same problem with my Dad's Browning Light-12 auto. I added a slip-on recoil pad and it has worked great. Also did the same thing to my Remington 870 when I restocked it with factory plastic (with built in recoil pad). Works fine! My neck and arms are long so I need something that will give me a little more distance between the receiver and my shoulder.

It's an in expensive way to find out if this is your problem. You could also slip some shims inside the slip-on to see if that helps too. Then think about restocking it if you don't like the looks of slip-on.

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from Citori- wrote 4 years 15 weeks ago

Im am very gracious that my dad bought me it. A shim? would a local gun smith be able to put one in?

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 15 weeks ago

You can buy a slip-on recoil pad at any gunshop/outdoors store. Try it on. If that helps but doesn't quite do it, try cutting some shims from Masonite hardboard and slip them inside the slip-on before slipping it on. Use the butt or buttplate on the gun as a template for shims. I think that a wooden shim added to the butt of the gun would be more unsightly than a slip-on. If the slip-on gives you the right length to be looking down the barrel instead of up it, and if you don't like the looks of a slip on (the guys at the skeet club will probably think you're bush league), then take the gun to a gunsmith and have a new stock made that's the same length as the old one with slip-on pad installed.

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from Citori- wrote 4 years 15 weeks ago

For me it doesnt matter how it looks just that it shoots where I want it to.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

Okay, here's a site with several different slip-on recoil pads. http://www.thefind.com/sports/info-butler-creek-recoil-pad Pick one up and see if it helps. Let me know how it works out.

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from Citori- wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

Thanks Ontario Honker you have been a real help.

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from MLH wrote 4 years 13 weeks ago

Best bet is to take it in and get it fitted. Gunsmith might recommend an adjustable recoil pad, cut down or lengthen the stock, remove material at the comb, or shim the stock to better fit you..

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from MLH wrote 4 years 13 weeks ago

By the way, adding the extended recoil pad as Ontario Honker suggests will move our head back on the stock and lower your head. Might also create some other problems if length of pull gets too long.

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from Citori- wrote 4 years 13 weeks ago

My father just told me i would get used to it after awhill.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 13 weeks ago

Don't count on it! I bought the Browning humpback you see in some of my profile pics when I was in the Army overseas. I couldn't hit a dang thing with it, even after a couple of years. Final straw was when I jumped up three beautiful fully-feathered pintail males off a ditch in mid-December. They came up right at my feet. Three shots and I never touched a feather. The following summer I traded it to my dad for his .357 Patrolman (I needed a saddle bag gun). When he died ten years ago, I got the Browning back. I put a slipon pad on it and have been doing great with it since then.

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from matt wasson wrote 4 years 13 weeks ago

yes I would head to a gunsmith/shop that also has a shooting area clays/trap/ range
recoil pads and stock work takes alittle more time then most people think, this is a slow process with long returns

Having that just right feel is very important...have fun

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from Citori- wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

Well I would but it's not really my choice here. My dad said buying they gun is enough. So ill just try and get used to it.

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from Sayfu wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

Down at it? Your eye then seems to be placed too high above the rib. The options are to take the comb down a bit, OR put your eye farther back by adding length to the stock....the stock drops as you move back towards the butt. That means a simple shim to add length could do the trick, not that hard, or expensive for a gunsmith to do. If your eye is too high over the rib then you will shoot high. Some trap shooters like it that way, and they "float" the target shooting when the bird is slightly high over the barrel not "covering" the target. This way, on angled shots especially, your eye never leaves sight of the target because the barrel is blocking it out.

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from Sayfu wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

Here is another thought on gun fit. Why do mfgers not address the fact that a lot of shotgunners require a different length of pull in order for the gun to fit them then the "standard" length provided? It ain't that hard. One model of Benelli's line of autos addresses it, the SPORT model I think it is. You can pop in, and change the pad thickness, and shims can be added, or subtracted to easily alter the length of pull so that a gun properly fits a bigger range of shooters. Seems like it would be a great selling point.

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from matt wasson wrote 4 years 15 weeks ago

dont know..how about just continue to practice shooting and see if it grows on ya.. be thankful your dad buys you guns, that stopped after 13yrs old in our family..after you got your one and only single shot 12gage!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 15 weeks ago

Had the same problem with my Dad's Browning Light-12 auto. I added a slip-on recoil pad and it has worked great. Also did the same thing to my Remington 870 when I restocked it with factory plastic (with built in recoil pad). Works fine! My neck and arms are long so I need something that will give me a little more distance between the receiver and my shoulder.

It's an in expensive way to find out if this is your problem. You could also slip some shims inside the slip-on to see if that helps too. Then think about restocking it if you don't like the looks of slip-on.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Citori- wrote 4 years 15 weeks ago

Im am very gracious that my dad bought me it. A shim? would a local gun smith be able to put one in?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 15 weeks ago

You can buy a slip-on recoil pad at any gunshop/outdoors store. Try it on. If that helps but doesn't quite do it, try cutting some shims from Masonite hardboard and slip them inside the slip-on before slipping it on. Use the butt or buttplate on the gun as a template for shims. I think that a wooden shim added to the butt of the gun would be more unsightly than a slip-on. If the slip-on gives you the right length to be looking down the barrel instead of up it, and if you don't like the looks of a slip on (the guys at the skeet club will probably think you're bush league), then take the gun to a gunsmith and have a new stock made that's the same length as the old one with slip-on pad installed.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Citori- wrote 4 years 15 weeks ago

For me it doesnt matter how it looks just that it shoots where I want it to.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

Okay, here's a site with several different slip-on recoil pads. http://www.thefind.com/sports/info-butler-creek-recoil-pad Pick one up and see if it helps. Let me know how it works out.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Citori- wrote 4 years 14 weeks ago

Thanks Ontario Honker you have been a real help.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 4 years 13 weeks ago

Best bet is to take it in and get it fitted. Gunsmith might recommend an adjustable recoil pad, cut down or lengthen the stock, remove material at the comb, or shim the stock to better fit you..

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 4 years 13 weeks ago

By the way, adding the extended recoil pad as Ontario Honker suggests will move our head back on the stock and lower your head. Might also create some other problems if length of pull gets too long.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Citori- wrote 4 years 13 weeks ago

My father just told me i would get used to it after awhill.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 13 weeks ago

Don't count on it! I bought the Browning humpback you see in some of my profile pics when I was in the Army overseas. I couldn't hit a dang thing with it, even after a couple of years. Final straw was when I jumped up three beautiful fully-feathered pintail males off a ditch in mid-December. They came up right at my feet. Three shots and I never touched a feather. The following summer I traded it to my dad for his .357 Patrolman (I needed a saddle bag gun). When he died ten years ago, I got the Browning back. I put a slipon pad on it and have been doing great with it since then.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from matt wasson wrote 4 years 13 weeks ago

yes I would head to a gunsmith/shop that also has a shooting area clays/trap/ range
recoil pads and stock work takes alittle more time then most people think, this is a slow process with long returns

Having that just right feel is very important...have fun

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Citori- wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

Well I would but it's not really my choice here. My dad said buying they gun is enough. So ill just try and get used to it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

Down at it? Your eye then seems to be placed too high above the rib. The options are to take the comb down a bit, OR put your eye farther back by adding length to the stock....the stock drops as you move back towards the butt. That means a simple shim to add length could do the trick, not that hard, or expensive for a gunsmith to do. If your eye is too high over the rib then you will shoot high. Some trap shooters like it that way, and they "float" the target shooting when the bird is slightly high over the barrel not "covering" the target. This way, on angled shots especially, your eye never leaves sight of the target because the barrel is blocking it out.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

Here is another thought on gun fit. Why do mfgers not address the fact that a lot of shotgunners require a different length of pull in order for the gun to fit them then the "standard" length provided? It ain't that hard. One model of Benelli's line of autos addresses it, the SPORT model I think it is. You can pop in, and change the pad thickness, and shims can be added, or subtracted to easily alter the length of pull so that a gun properly fits a bigger range of shooters. Seems like it would be a great selling point.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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