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Deer Hunting

Beginning Bowhunting

Uploaded on February 23, 2009

I am just beginning to bowhunt and I am not sure what type of broadheads or arrows to use. I want a type of broadhead I can use for both smallgame and large game(deer and hog), and I want a universal type of arrow.

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from Christian Emter wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

Same hear. I need to take a bowhunter coarse and I'm ready to bow hunt. I just got some Thunderhead broadheads. I would use a carbon express arrows. You might have a better choice of broad heads than mine. I bought those because they were cheap and in my price range. $20-$30.

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from sere9501 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

Is there a preference of advantage to having broadheads versus not? I am also looking to start this year and would like to know. Also I was told you need to practic shoot with what you will hunt with, does that mean shoot with your broadheads? I only ask since they are more expensive.

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from bowhunter352 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

As far as broadheads for hunting deer and turkey, You use about the same thing, same size. Like whatever you buy for hunting deer will work for hogs also. I use rage broadheads[2 blade] and they work awesome. But, theyr $45, so maybe a little more then what you want. Muzzys work pretty descent and pretty cheap. Carbon express is a wide known and very popular arrow choice especially among beginners and also vetrens. Theyr well made arrows. You don't always have to practice with what you hunt with unless its a fixed point, like muzzys, rages you don't have too. They come with a practice point. if you need to know anything else just ask me?!

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from deerslayer1 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

I use grim reaper broad heads-not only the sides are sharp but the bottom of them are too. I dont know if you prefer carbon of alumnin..i use carbon-better flight

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from buckhunter wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

Whatever bow you buy make sure you learn to shoot it. Shooting a bow is 95% skill and 5% equipment. Even the manufacturer sales reps will tell you there is very little difference in bows anymore.

As for broadheads. F&S had a good article on guides opinions of what hunters do WRONG the most. I think near the top of the list is mechanical broadheads. I've shot both and overwhelmingly prefer the 100 grn Thunderheads.

Choose an arrow the matches the weight of your bow. Most shops will have a chart. I think arrows are so hi-tech anymore that the cheap ones are good for hunting.

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from steve182 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

It may get expensive, but you should try a few different broadheads until you find one that shoots the same as your fieldpoints(practice tips). Then you don't have to shoot your broadheads to practice, dulling them and tearing up your target. Just be sure to verify they shoot the same before going hunting. Good luck

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from cxm412 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

I prefer a smaller broad head like the Slick Trick or Muzzy MX line. I find the Slick Trick shoot almost the same as my field points and this cuts down on the time it takes to tune them. I also like that the blades can be resharpened. I have a set that I practise with and a set for hunting.

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from gunshot wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

It's preference. Don't start out with 4 blade 125gr heads and quad fletching. Start in the middle, get comfortable and tweak from there. In the stand, I use fixed open broadheads (muzzy mx-3 or Rocky Mtn titanium). Keep a set of blades for practice and change before opening day. If I'm still hunting, I use a Wasp mechanical head 100gr. I think it's just safer that way but for boar, I'd stick to fixed blades. Match the spine of your carbon arrows to the draw weight and length and paper tune with field tips and broadheads so your nock point is true. I used to like the prong rests because it was simple but the helical fletching is a problem so i switched to the ripcord and never looked back. Practice as much as possible, it's confidence and proficiency that kills more than the gear...good luck.

Try this: http://www.american-hunter.com/broadheads/broadhead_test.htm

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from bailor 09 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

you can never go wrong with a good ol' muzzy broadhead on a carbon express arrow.

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from northern sportsman wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

Looking for a good broadhead is a matter of personal preference depending on who the person is cabela's is a good place to start. Your old time performers is the thunderhead or muzzy broadheads there priced right and very solid as far as the new heads on the market the rage mechanical is buy far one of the best ive seen in years. Arrows is also one of personal taste easton arrows have been the standard for many years with many other great company's to follow. The most important thing to do is to test a few different models out with what your going to do with them in mind. Get out there and test them out and live the outdoor dream!

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from rezavoirdog wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

Slick Trick 100 grain, Magnum, Fixed-Blades. $25.00/3-pack. Field point accuracy and tough as nails.

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from Big_D wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

I like the muzzy 100g broadhead. They are really durable plus the blades lock together ensuring that they dont fall out or get out of alignment. As far as arrows im still in the stone age using aluminum.

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from hjohn429 wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

I say you should go with what flies well. I would choose a solid carbon arrow with a fixed-blade broadhead. I use Easton Epic ST arrows fletched with Bohning blazer vanes and tipped with G5 Montec 100 grainers.

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from gunshot wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

It's preference. Don't start out with 4 blade 125gr heads and quad fletching. Start in the middle, get comfortable and tweak from there. In the stand, I use fixed open broadheads (muzzy mx-3 or Rocky Mtn titanium). Keep a set of blades for practice and change before opening day. If I'm still hunting, I use a Wasp mechanical head 100gr. I think it's just safer that way but for boar, I'd stick to fixed blades. Match the spine of your carbon arrows to the draw weight and length and paper tune with field tips and broadheads so your nock point is true. I used to like the prong rests because it was simple but the helical fletching is a problem so i switched to the ripcord and never looked back. Practice as much as possible, it's confidence and proficiency that kills more than the gear...good luck.

Try this: http://www.american-hunter.com/broadheads/broadhead_test.htm

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bailor 09 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

you can never go wrong with a good ol' muzzy broadhead on a carbon express arrow.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rezavoirdog wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

Slick Trick 100 grain, Magnum, Fixed-Blades. $25.00/3-pack. Field point accuracy and tough as nails.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Christian Emter wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

Same hear. I need to take a bowhunter coarse and I'm ready to bow hunt. I just got some Thunderhead broadheads. I would use a carbon express arrows. You might have a better choice of broad heads than mine. I bought those because they were cheap and in my price range. $20-$30.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from sere9501 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

Is there a preference of advantage to having broadheads versus not? I am also looking to start this year and would like to know. Also I was told you need to practic shoot with what you will hunt with, does that mean shoot with your broadheads? I only ask since they are more expensive.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bowhunter352 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

As far as broadheads for hunting deer and turkey, You use about the same thing, same size. Like whatever you buy for hunting deer will work for hogs also. I use rage broadheads[2 blade] and they work awesome. But, theyr $45, so maybe a little more then what you want. Muzzys work pretty descent and pretty cheap. Carbon express is a wide known and very popular arrow choice especially among beginners and also vetrens. Theyr well made arrows. You don't always have to practice with what you hunt with unless its a fixed point, like muzzys, rages you don't have too. They come with a practice point. if you need to know anything else just ask me?!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerslayer1 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

I use grim reaper broad heads-not only the sides are sharp but the bottom of them are too. I dont know if you prefer carbon of alumnin..i use carbon-better flight

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

Whatever bow you buy make sure you learn to shoot it. Shooting a bow is 95% skill and 5% equipment. Even the manufacturer sales reps will tell you there is very little difference in bows anymore.

As for broadheads. F&S had a good article on guides opinions of what hunters do WRONG the most. I think near the top of the list is mechanical broadheads. I've shot both and overwhelmingly prefer the 100 grn Thunderheads.

Choose an arrow the matches the weight of your bow. Most shops will have a chart. I think arrows are so hi-tech anymore that the cheap ones are good for hunting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

It may get expensive, but you should try a few different broadheads until you find one that shoots the same as your fieldpoints(practice tips). Then you don't have to shoot your broadheads to practice, dulling them and tearing up your target. Just be sure to verify they shoot the same before going hunting. Good luck

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from cxm412 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

I prefer a smaller broad head like the Slick Trick or Muzzy MX line. I find the Slick Trick shoot almost the same as my field points and this cuts down on the time it takes to tune them. I also like that the blades can be resharpened. I have a set that I practise with and a set for hunting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from northern sportsman wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

Looking for a good broadhead is a matter of personal preference depending on who the person is cabela's is a good place to start. Your old time performers is the thunderhead or muzzy broadheads there priced right and very solid as far as the new heads on the market the rage mechanical is buy far one of the best ive seen in years. Arrows is also one of personal taste easton arrows have been the standard for many years with many other great company's to follow. The most important thing to do is to test a few different models out with what your going to do with them in mind. Get out there and test them out and live the outdoor dream!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big_D wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

I like the muzzy 100g broadhead. They are really durable plus the blades lock together ensuring that they dont fall out or get out of alignment. As far as arrows im still in the stone age using aluminum.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from hjohn429 wrote 5 years 4 weeks ago

I say you should go with what flies well. I would choose a solid carbon arrow with a fixed-blade broadhead. I use Easton Epic ST arrows fletched with Bohning blazer vanes and tipped with G5 Montec 100 grainers.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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