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Q:
I am new to fly fishing and i am practicing my cast. i cannot seem to cast more than 10 yards, and i have lost flies and a leader becuase they are falling apart. I need help, any videos???

Question by Sportsman21. Uploaded on January 19, 2010

Answers (8)

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from hengst wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

Seems like you may be "whipping" which will always cause you to lose your fly. Try a piece of yarn its cheaper until you get better. You will eventually get a feel for it, just slow down and be smooth its about timing and being smooth. Remember you start getting the line moving fluidly and you are using momentum to keep it going using the force of the line not quick force like spin fishing.
Check out flyfisherman.com for better advice. And keep practicing after a while you will be just fine.... Once you get it down you won't want to do to many false casts anyway escpecially if fishing "spooky" fish...I hope all of this made sense it is easier to show than tell......You may also want to invest the money and go to a beginner flycasting class at the local fly shop...someare free or cheap so they can earn your business..........enjoy

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from hengst wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

http://www.flyfisherman.com/content/basic-casting

Here ya go...these folks get paid to explain things in writing as I obviously and for reason don't (lol)

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from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

This is a common problem when you begin to fly cast. You are pulling your cast forward before the line has time to extend fully behind you on the backcast. This will whip the last few feet of the line very quickly, putting knots in your leader and snapping off flies. After you let the line out, pick it up briskly and move the rod back until it is at 12:00 over your head. Hesitate at that position and notice that the line continues back over your head until it straightens out behind you. Just as it is fully extended behind you, move the rod forward to the 2:00 postion, pulling the line with it. It will take a second for the line to come sailing over your head and shooting forward. That is really all there is to fly casting. You just have to hesitate a split second on your back cast waiting for the line to fully extend behind you before you move it forward. Don't worry about where the fly is at... it will come along with the line. You also have to let out enough line at the start to give it sufficient weight to cast. In fly fishing, you are casting the line, not the fly and you need enough line to have weight.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

Here's a good site for all the knots you'll need for fly fishing: http://killroys.com/knots/albright-knot/ Check out the other knots on the list on right side of web page. You'll want a nail knot to attach leader to line. Use a small piece of soda straw or one of those plastic coffee stirrer things to help you with that knot.

Make sure your equipment is all balanced. If you have 5 weight line, you need a 5 weight rod. For a beginner, I'd suggest weight forward fly line and, for small water, about a 6 wt rod and single action reel (not an automatic reel). As Dakota said, wait till that line is all the way back and then a split second longer before bringing the rod forward. It's called "loading" the rod/line. Do not cast with your shoulder and whole arm (i.e. don't "wave" the rod), only use your wrist and forearm. Keep your elbow in and relatively motionless.

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from Sourdough Dave wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

Start by watching your loop until you can time your forward and back casts by feel. Keep the loop tight and flat rather than arcing overhead. Let the line extend before changing its direction to avoid cracking the whip and destroying your tippet and fly. Keep your wrist stiff and cast with your forearm taking care to not overextend beyond 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock until you lay down the cast for the presentation.

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from Sportsman21 wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

Thanks everyone

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from Sayfu wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

I am a fly fishing instructor, and can tell you it is not that hard, yet has to be done right using the right mechanics, or fly fishing becomes a chore rather than being fun. Find a local Trout Unlimited Club...they usually offer fly casting lessons for free. Lefty Kreh is an outstanding instructor, and has some easy to read, and short books on the subject. But there are others as well. The key is to make sure you are always making two casts..a good back cast that puts the line in position to make a good forecast. The relationship between the wrist and the arm allows you to make tight loops, and direct the line to and from the target. lefty does not want you to use the clock face as a guide. He wants the rod tip travelling up on the back cast, and stopping on the way up, not over the top. He wants straight line concepts...the line goes where the rod tip goes, and the rod tip goes where your hand and arm direct it to go. Good luck, you need to practice the right techniques, or you only create bad habits that are hard to break.

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from Sayfu wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

Here is a thought on the knots used to tie a tippet to the fly. I only use one, but once in awhile will use a loop knot to tie to a streamer that I want to allow extra motion, because it isn't tied tight to the eye of the hook.
I use an unimproved clinch knot, and have never heard anyone give the reason that I give for using it. It is stronger than the improved clinch knot, and since once you learn to properly play a fish, you seldom, if ever, break a fish off at the knot, not a freshwater trout anyway. But here is the reason why I use it. I can tie it, and only have a fraction of an inch left over to have to trim off. By going through the bottom loop, and holding the mono there just barely through the loop, I can wet, and draw the knot up secure with little left over to trim off. Pull it tight in your hand, and if it doesn't slip out then it won't slip out when fishing. Now I can tie a lot of flies on that same leader without having to tie on a new leader, or add on a new tippet.
Other knots that are rated stronger, I will not use if they have a good amount of tippet to trim off after you tie the knot!

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from hengst wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

Seems like you may be "whipping" which will always cause you to lose your fly. Try a piece of yarn its cheaper until you get better. You will eventually get a feel for it, just slow down and be smooth its about timing and being smooth. Remember you start getting the line moving fluidly and you are using momentum to keep it going using the force of the line not quick force like spin fishing.
Check out flyfisherman.com for better advice. And keep practicing after a while you will be just fine.... Once you get it down you won't want to do to many false casts anyway escpecially if fishing "spooky" fish...I hope all of this made sense it is easier to show than tell......You may also want to invest the money and go to a beginner flycasting class at the local fly shop...someare free or cheap so they can earn your business..........enjoy

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

This is a common problem when you begin to fly cast. You are pulling your cast forward before the line has time to extend fully behind you on the backcast. This will whip the last few feet of the line very quickly, putting knots in your leader and snapping off flies. After you let the line out, pick it up briskly and move the rod back until it is at 12:00 over your head. Hesitate at that position and notice that the line continues back over your head until it straightens out behind you. Just as it is fully extended behind you, move the rod forward to the 2:00 postion, pulling the line with it. It will take a second for the line to come sailing over your head and shooting forward. That is really all there is to fly casting. You just have to hesitate a split second on your back cast waiting for the line to fully extend behind you before you move it forward. Don't worry about where the fly is at... it will come along with the line. You also have to let out enough line at the start to give it sufficient weight to cast. In fly fishing, you are casting the line, not the fly and you need enough line to have weight.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hengst wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

http://www.flyfisherman.com/content/basic-casting

Here ya go...these folks get paid to explain things in writing as I obviously and for reason don't (lol)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

Here's a good site for all the knots you'll need for fly fishing: http://killroys.com/knots/albright-knot/ Check out the other knots on the list on right side of web page. You'll want a nail knot to attach leader to line. Use a small piece of soda straw or one of those plastic coffee stirrer things to help you with that knot.

Make sure your equipment is all balanced. If you have 5 weight line, you need a 5 weight rod. For a beginner, I'd suggest weight forward fly line and, for small water, about a 6 wt rod and single action reel (not an automatic reel). As Dakota said, wait till that line is all the way back and then a split second longer before bringing the rod forward. It's called "loading" the rod/line. Do not cast with your shoulder and whole arm (i.e. don't "wave" the rod), only use your wrist and forearm. Keep your elbow in and relatively motionless.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sourdough Dave wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

Start by watching your loop until you can time your forward and back casts by feel. Keep the loop tight and flat rather than arcing overhead. Let the line extend before changing its direction to avoid cracking the whip and destroying your tippet and fly. Keep your wrist stiff and cast with your forearm taking care to not overextend beyond 10 o'clock and 2 o'clock until you lay down the cast for the presentation.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sportsman21 wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

Thanks everyone

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

I am a fly fishing instructor, and can tell you it is not that hard, yet has to be done right using the right mechanics, or fly fishing becomes a chore rather than being fun. Find a local Trout Unlimited Club...they usually offer fly casting lessons for free. Lefty Kreh is an outstanding instructor, and has some easy to read, and short books on the subject. But there are others as well. The key is to make sure you are always making two casts..a good back cast that puts the line in position to make a good forecast. The relationship between the wrist and the arm allows you to make tight loops, and direct the line to and from the target. lefty does not want you to use the clock face as a guide. He wants the rod tip travelling up on the back cast, and stopping on the way up, not over the top. He wants straight line concepts...the line goes where the rod tip goes, and the rod tip goes where your hand and arm direct it to go. Good luck, you need to practice the right techniques, or you only create bad habits that are hard to break.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

Here is a thought on the knots used to tie a tippet to the fly. I only use one, but once in awhile will use a loop knot to tie to a streamer that I want to allow extra motion, because it isn't tied tight to the eye of the hook.
I use an unimproved clinch knot, and have never heard anyone give the reason that I give for using it. It is stronger than the improved clinch knot, and since once you learn to properly play a fish, you seldom, if ever, break a fish off at the knot, not a freshwater trout anyway. But here is the reason why I use it. I can tie it, and only have a fraction of an inch left over to have to trim off. By going through the bottom loop, and holding the mono there just barely through the loop, I can wet, and draw the knot up secure with little left over to trim off. Pull it tight in your hand, and if it doesn't slip out then it won't slip out when fishing. Now I can tie a lot of flies on that same leader without having to tie on a new leader, or add on a new tippet.
Other knots that are rated stronger, I will not use if they have a good amount of tippet to trim off after you tie the knot!

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