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Q:
I have been trying to read up on elk hunting public land in the hopes of taking a trip west in a couple of years when I get the money. Most of the books I have read teach you how to hunt them but I have a lot of questions about the camping aspect of it. I have read a lot about having to find the herd but do I pack the camp with me every hike each new day or set up a camp to come back to every night after trying to locate them?

Question by jbwill9. Uploaded on June 02, 2009

Answers (11)

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from buckhunter wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

We set up came along the forest service roads and simply walk or drive to where the elk are or at least where we think the elk are

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from Big O wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

buckhunters right, this is the easiest way. Or you can "pack" in with either horse's(not cheap) or hike in. Either way it is called "hunting" for a reason.
There are several staes with "camp grounds" by good elk hunting places. Talk to Game and Fish in the states your looking at hunting in.
Good luck and good hunting.

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from jbwill9 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I know I am probably being nieve about it all but I really want to hike in as far as I can get from where someone else can get, mainly meaning roads and things. I am bow hunting too so the more cover the better. I guess I am just worried about not being able to cover enough ground with a fixed camp site to come back to every night.

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from Del in KS wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

If you do that and shoot an elk you will have one heck of a time getting the meat out by packing. You need a plan for getting several hundred pounds of meat back to the truck.

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from jbwill9 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

See, that's another question I didn't have an answer to. And I'm not really worried about getting it back to camp but how do I keep the meat good while it is at camp before I get it to the truck. I can't pack ice everywhere.

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from Big O wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

Use "game" bags and hang in shade, and ice as soon as possible.

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from 268bull wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

My take on it would be to set up a base camp and hunt out of it daily. Moving a camp every day will cut into your hunt time( break down, set up, locate, etc.).Your days will start well before daybreak, lasting till dusk,a lot of hunt time. You could possibly break camp once after 3 days or so if the areas your concentrating on are not producing any activity. However, I think you'll find that once you have a good campsite the last thing you'll want to do is interupt your hunt time by having to move camp.

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from 268bull wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

jbwill9, You've asked multiple ?'s so I'll try to help a little more. By wanting to isolate yourself from roads and people you have put a lot of demand on yourself for(I'm assuming)a first time hunt. In the event you make a kill, you're, by yourself, you have to field butcher by yourself, you have to pack the animal by yourself, you have to pack beyond an isolated camp to your rig, your already worried about keeping the meat. You've already made the decision to travel west for the hunt, save the extra and hire an outfitter. Observe and learn everything you can from that outfitter and you'll be better prepared to take on the challenges of a do it yourself hunt. You should enjoy yourself without all the extra stressors hunting by yourself for a first time hunt may bring. My last (by myself)bull took me a day and a half to breakdown and pack (only a mile and a half from a road)in nasty country. I hope this has helped a little. Whatever you decide,have a good hunt and have fun!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 175rltw wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

I am a pretty dedicated backpack hunter, and often times will go solo. in Alaska that means I have to be able to carry out an entire kill solo, in one trip if I'm not with a buddy or two, because the brown bears will claim your kill. I am willing to tote those often miserable loads because it's the style of hunt I prefer. In the lower 48 you often have the luxury of being able to make multiple trips to retrieve your kill and finally your horns. The trouble you will encounter will be worth the reward. Definately bring game game bags (I use old pillow cases and sheets sewn up as bags from goodwill) and spray them with citirc acid to help prevent spoilage. I also camp out of a bivy sack so I can move camp daily or as needed without the drama of "breaking camp" and also minus the extra weight, (about 3pnds) of a tent, unless with a buddy of course. Backpack hunting requries some specialized gear, and some serious motivation. I highly reccomend you get out there after it, but... This being your first trip I suggest you go with an outfitter who understands the type of hunt you are intersted in. This will introduce you to the equpment and challenges you will encounter along the way, and help speed your learning curve. Consider a guided back country trip to be college credits, you are buying an education, not just a hunt. Based on the things you learn on this hunt you will have more success and be better prepared for solo expeditions, or trips with your buddies. In the meantime on the cheap you can go on high percentage antelope hunts in wyoming, montana etc, which will also give you an opportunity to begin to meet people in the areas you are interested in and develop relationships, and give you a few extra days (on a week long trip) to get into the timber and see the terrain, first hand, if nothing else it'll get you out west, and keep your apetite for adventure keen.

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from tom donohue wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

if your bow hunting ill assume its early season. if so
then a backpack hunt may be the ticket. 2 changes of clothes and 3 to 4 days worth of food and hit the trail. hunting under a pack gets you out from under the crowd. when low on supplies head back to the rig to restock then back out again. good luck.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ElkHunter_28 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

i think it depends what the weather is to camp out or to hike everyday. I have done both and both are hard every way you look at it. Camping on the mountain in the winter is hard i mean hard. You have to carry up thick sleeping bags plus more warm clothes but camping when it is 50 or 60 degrees is easy because all you have to carry the clothes you have to sleep in and wear in the morning no sleeping bags or light sleeping bags if you want to it personally hike up my mountain at three in the morning to get to my elk spot at six

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

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from buckhunter wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

We set up came along the forest service roads and simply walk or drive to where the elk are or at least where we think the elk are

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

buckhunters right, this is the easiest way. Or you can "pack" in with either horse's(not cheap) or hike in. Either way it is called "hunting" for a reason.
There are several staes with "camp grounds" by good elk hunting places. Talk to Game and Fish in the states your looking at hunting in.
Good luck and good hunting.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

If you do that and shoot an elk you will have one heck of a time getting the meat out by packing. You need a plan for getting several hundred pounds of meat back to the truck.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jbwill9 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

See, that's another question I didn't have an answer to. And I'm not really worried about getting it back to camp but how do I keep the meat good while it is at camp before I get it to the truck. I can't pack ice everywhere.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

Use "game" bags and hang in shade, and ice as soon as possible.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 268bull wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

My take on it would be to set up a base camp and hunt out of it daily. Moving a camp every day will cut into your hunt time( break down, set up, locate, etc.).Your days will start well before daybreak, lasting till dusk,a lot of hunt time. You could possibly break camp once after 3 days or so if the areas your concentrating on are not producing any activity. However, I think you'll find that once you have a good campsite the last thing you'll want to do is interupt your hunt time by having to move camp.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 268bull wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

jbwill9, You've asked multiple ?'s so I'll try to help a little more. By wanting to isolate yourself from roads and people you have put a lot of demand on yourself for(I'm assuming)a first time hunt. In the event you make a kill, you're, by yourself, you have to field butcher by yourself, you have to pack the animal by yourself, you have to pack beyond an isolated camp to your rig, your already worried about keeping the meat. You've already made the decision to travel west for the hunt, save the extra and hire an outfitter. Observe and learn everything you can from that outfitter and you'll be better prepared to take on the challenges of a do it yourself hunt. You should enjoy yourself without all the extra stressors hunting by yourself for a first time hunt may bring. My last (by myself)bull took me a day and a half to breakdown and pack (only a mile and a half from a road)in nasty country. I hope this has helped a little. Whatever you decide,have a good hunt and have fun!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 175rltw wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

I am a pretty dedicated backpack hunter, and often times will go solo. in Alaska that means I have to be able to carry out an entire kill solo, in one trip if I'm not with a buddy or two, because the brown bears will claim your kill. I am willing to tote those often miserable loads because it's the style of hunt I prefer. In the lower 48 you often have the luxury of being able to make multiple trips to retrieve your kill and finally your horns. The trouble you will encounter will be worth the reward. Definately bring game game bags (I use old pillow cases and sheets sewn up as bags from goodwill) and spray them with citirc acid to help prevent spoilage. I also camp out of a bivy sack so I can move camp daily or as needed without the drama of "breaking camp" and also minus the extra weight, (about 3pnds) of a tent, unless with a buddy of course. Backpack hunting requries some specialized gear, and some serious motivation. I highly reccomend you get out there after it, but... This being your first trip I suggest you go with an outfitter who understands the type of hunt you are intersted in. This will introduce you to the equpment and challenges you will encounter along the way, and help speed your learning curve. Consider a guided back country trip to be college credits, you are buying an education, not just a hunt. Based on the things you learn on this hunt you will have more success and be better prepared for solo expeditions, or trips with your buddies. In the meantime on the cheap you can go on high percentage antelope hunts in wyoming, montana etc, which will also give you an opportunity to begin to meet people in the areas you are interested in and develop relationships, and give you a few extra days (on a week long trip) to get into the timber and see the terrain, first hand, if nothing else it'll get you out west, and keep your apetite for adventure keen.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom donohue wrote 4 years 37 weeks ago

if your bow hunting ill assume its early season. if so
then a backpack hunt may be the ticket. 2 changes of clothes and 3 to 4 days worth of food and hit the trail. hunting under a pack gets you out from under the crowd. when low on supplies head back to the rig to restock then back out again. good luck.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from ElkHunter_28 wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

i think it depends what the weather is to camp out or to hike everyday. I have done both and both are hard every way you look at it. Camping on the mountain in the winter is hard i mean hard. You have to carry up thick sleeping bags plus more warm clothes but camping when it is 50 or 60 degrees is easy because all you have to carry the clothes you have to sleep in and wear in the morning no sleeping bags or light sleeping bags if you want to it personally hike up my mountain at three in the morning to get to my elk spot at six

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jbwill9 wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I know I am probably being nieve about it all but I really want to hike in as far as I can get from where someone else can get, mainly meaning roads and things. I am bow hunting too so the more cover the better. I guess I am just worried about not being able to cover enough ground with a fixed camp site to come back to every night.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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