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Q:
What type of choke is best for duck and goose hunting?

Question by deerhunter125. Uploaded on December 08, 2009

Answers (10)

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from idduckhntr wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Get a Improved Modified.

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from hengst wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

I use a modified because I hunt over decoys. If you decide on a full choke for pass shooting make sure you check the pattern especially when using BB or BBB shot. But like I said I use a modified.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Need to experiment with chokes to get the best pattern with the shot your using

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from rabbitpolice88 wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

I use a modified for my mossberg 935, I shoot 3 inch winchester duck loads.

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from Greenhead wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Many people will tell you different, but I prefer to use "small" shot for ducks and geese in a tight choke. I use 6s for ducks and 2-4 for geese. I currently use the factory full choke because it patterns well with the shells I use.

While many hunters feel that they need to use larger shot in order to get good penetration on large birds, I think they are missing the point. Hits in vital organs do not drop birds; they will kill them, no doubt, but only after they fly a long way. I have personally seen a standing goose shot through the chest with a .22 take off, fly about 150 yards and then drop dead. The only way to drop a bird in its tracks is to either break a wing, or disrupt the central nervous system (head and neck). Neither of these targets are particularly hard to penetrate, so larger shot size is not required. Instead, I prefer to use small shot that gives me more pellets per shot, and thus a better chance of hitting one of these targets. The full choke produces a dense patten that increases the chances of hiting one of these spots. Another advantage is that with this type of load, you tend to get either a bird dead in the air, or a clean miss. Many fewer cripples. Those who advocate the large shot sizes are right about one thing, though, they do penetrate better, generally right through the breast of the bird. Smaller shot is not as bad about this.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Smaller shot doesn't break wings on geese worth beans. Sorry. Smaller shot is good for head kills and that's about it. And that's a pretty small target to hit with a pretty big pattern at forty to fifty yards. Greenhead, if you use #4 shot for geese then you're about the only one in the country that does. I'm betting that there's a lot of sore geese out there that are plenty sorry for it too.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

You'll be using either Full or Modified choke. Check the pattern on both with the shot you intend to use. I'd say BBs for geese and #2 for big ducks and #4 for smaller ones. GET FAST LOADS ONLY.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from NYhunter wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

For ducks I use a full choke, because where I hunt you have to nock'em down for good. And geese, shoot a full than if they flare at 40yds you can still get bb's out there. For duck's number 2 bbs and geese number 2 and BB or BBB. I like to shoot 3" for duck and 3 1/2" for geese. I've taken geese from 3yds out to 65yds with 3" 12ga too. 20ga kill geese but use a 12ga.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jestr1 wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I use full or mod depending on shot. I like to use a full with 2&4s for ducks and mod with bb for geese. Seems to work good for me. You have to test your gun and shot to see what shoots best for you.

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from norcalhunter7 wrote 4 years 15 weeks ago

modified

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from idduckhntr wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Get a Improved Modified.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from hengst wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

I use a modified because I hunt over decoys. If you decide on a full choke for pass shooting make sure you check the pattern especially when using BB or BBB shot. But like I said I use a modified.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Smaller shot doesn't break wings on geese worth beans. Sorry. Smaller shot is good for head kills and that's about it. And that's a pretty small target to hit with a pretty big pattern at forty to fifty yards. Greenhead, if you use #4 shot for geese then you're about the only one in the country that does. I'm betting that there's a lot of sore geese out there that are plenty sorry for it too.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

You'll be using either Full or Modified choke. Check the pattern on both with the shot you intend to use. I'd say BBs for geese and #2 for big ducks and #4 for smaller ones. GET FAST LOADS ONLY.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Need to experiment with chokes to get the best pattern with the shot your using

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rabbitpolice88 wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

I use a modified for my mossberg 935, I shoot 3 inch winchester duck loads.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Greenhead wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Many people will tell you different, but I prefer to use "small" shot for ducks and geese in a tight choke. I use 6s for ducks and 2-4 for geese. I currently use the factory full choke because it patterns well with the shells I use.

While many hunters feel that they need to use larger shot in order to get good penetration on large birds, I think they are missing the point. Hits in vital organs do not drop birds; they will kill them, no doubt, but only after they fly a long way. I have personally seen a standing goose shot through the chest with a .22 take off, fly about 150 yards and then drop dead. The only way to drop a bird in its tracks is to either break a wing, or disrupt the central nervous system (head and neck). Neither of these targets are particularly hard to penetrate, so larger shot size is not required. Instead, I prefer to use small shot that gives me more pellets per shot, and thus a better chance of hitting one of these targets. The full choke produces a dense patten that increases the chances of hiting one of these spots. Another advantage is that with this type of load, you tend to get either a bird dead in the air, or a clean miss. Many fewer cripples. Those who advocate the large shot sizes are right about one thing, though, they do penetrate better, generally right through the breast of the bird. Smaller shot is not as bad about this.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from norcalhunter7 wrote 4 years 15 weeks ago

modified

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from NYhunter wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

For ducks I use a full choke, because where I hunt you have to nock'em down for good. And geese, shoot a full than if they flare at 40yds you can still get bb's out there. For duck's number 2 bbs and geese number 2 and BB or BBB. I like to shoot 3" for duck and 3 1/2" for geese. I've taken geese from 3yds out to 65yds with 3" 12ga too. 20ga kill geese but use a 12ga.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jestr1 wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

I use full or mod depending on shot. I like to use a full with 2&4s for ducks and mod with bb for geese. Seems to work good for me. You have to test your gun and shot to see what shoots best for you.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer