Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

AnswersASK YOUR QUESTION

Answers

Q:
Do tree squirrels hibernate?

Question by Dustin321BANG. Uploaded on October 05, 2009

Answers (20)

Top Rated
All Answers
from LesserSon wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

If you mean gray squirrels and their relatives: no. They build a leafy nest in a tree, and spend most of the winter trying to stay out of the wind. They come down to forrage for acorns, beechnuts, etc on the forest floor, especially when the weather is calm. They probably have it worst in February.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

No. They also mate 4 times a year.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

BEAT ME !
They do "sleep in" on rainy/snow days, but just like you mostly at night.
Good Luck and Good Hunting !

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

They would never go all winter hibernating like a bear. You have me looking this up now! I think they may do "torpor" instead of "hibernation" as clearly IMO there can be long periods of inactivity [several days] in bad weather.

>They build a leafy nest in a tree

they prefer a den in a hole in a tree, in which they put that nest. Some years there are squirrels aplenty and you don't see many nests. It is certainly true that wind bums them out.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Tree RATS do not hibernate, they stay curled up in thier warm rat nests. tree rats will hide nuts for the coming winter, then search out the nuts as needed. They move less in the winter because there are no leaves to hide their movements from hawks, owls and other predators, but they still move.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

It is a fact that squirrels do not remember where they bury their nuts.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

More squirrel trivia...
I shot a fox squirrel in the head with a 60lb stick bow and it split my G5 small game head in half. If that says anything about how hard their heads are (or how junky the G5 head is).

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

>Tree RATS

spoken like a man who doesnt eat them.

we are talking about a rodent all right... but one that is a delicacy, sir. That only sounds like I'm joking!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

>If that says anything about how hard their heads are

hides are tough too. Do not use light loads as for dove in your shotgun. Calls for "high brass"

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

I beg ur pardon? I make the best tree rat tips & gravy in my neck of the woods. I'd lay odds that I've ate more wild game than you will your entire lifetime.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Tree squirrels have a number of adaptations for coping with the winter, including, but not limited to: food caching, lowered metabolism, thermo-regulation in micro-climates, torpor (frequent periods of lowered metabolism, lowered body temperature, and inactivity), and group nesting. There are very few true hibernators.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Fox squirrels are active all winter and feed actively over the deep snow in the frozen tundra of the midwest. Their fur gets real thick and they put on fat for the winter.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

>I beg ur pardon? I make the best tree rat tips & gravy

Excuse me then, but you are not invited to join our foundation [Americans for Squirrel at Every Dinner Table] if you keep calling them rats [g]. Donations accepted.

>squirrels have a number of adaptations
>for coping with the winter

I was hoping we would hear from Bioguy!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from LesserSon wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

You guys are skirting the issue: would you eat a rat?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from squirrelhunter7 wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Gray, fox, and red squirrels don't sleep threw the winter. They sleep longer, But dont hibernate

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

>would you eat a rat?

AFSAEDT opposes this kind of conversation, sir, but if I knew a rat was eating nothing but hickory nuts I could be pretty sure it'd be fine if I could get over the idea.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

changing that foundation name to ASEDT, pronounced "asset" [g]

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from flintlock62 wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Wouldn't eat the species of rat that hangs out around garbage cans, but tree squirrels have a very different diet and are only in the rodent family.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from CarliusD0 wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

round squirrels (like chipmunks and prairie dogs) live in ground burrows, and many become dormant in winter (hibernate). Tree squirrels genera contains most of the common, bushy-tailed squirrels in North America, Europe, Asia, and South America, which prefer the heights of the trees, as opposed to ground squirrels, and spend little time on the ground.

Tree squirrels do not hibernate during the winter months, but they keep all activities to a minimum to conserve energy. Hence, they often seem to almost completely disappear during the winter months. Winter tree nests (called dreys) are often shared for warmth where tree squirrels keep warm by snuggling with their family members. When they sleep, they use their big furry tails to cover themselves to keep as warm as possible. A squirrel will come out now and then to search for hidden stores of food.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from grant77 wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

nooooooooooo

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

from LesserSon wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

If you mean gray squirrels and their relatives: no. They build a leafy nest in a tree, and spend most of the winter trying to stay out of the wind. They come down to forrage for acorns, beechnuts, etc on the forest floor, especially when the weather is calm. They probably have it worst in February.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

No. They also mate 4 times a year.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

BEAT ME !
They do "sleep in" on rainy/snow days, but just like you mostly at night.
Good Luck and Good Hunting !

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

They would never go all winter hibernating like a bear. You have me looking this up now! I think they may do "torpor" instead of "hibernation" as clearly IMO there can be long periods of inactivity [several days] in bad weather.

>They build a leafy nest in a tree

they prefer a den in a hole in a tree, in which they put that nest. Some years there are squirrels aplenty and you don't see many nests. It is certainly true that wind bums them out.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Tree RATS do not hibernate, they stay curled up in thier warm rat nests. tree rats will hide nuts for the coming winter, then search out the nuts as needed. They move less in the winter because there are no leaves to hide their movements from hawks, owls and other predators, but they still move.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

It is a fact that squirrels do not remember where they bury their nuts.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

>Tree RATS

spoken like a man who doesnt eat them.

we are talking about a rodent all right... but one that is a delicacy, sir. That only sounds like I'm joking!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

>If that says anything about how hard their heads are

hides are tough too. Do not use light loads as for dove in your shotgun. Calls for "high brass"

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

More squirrel trivia...
I shot a fox squirrel in the head with a 60lb stick bow and it split my G5 small game head in half. If that says anything about how hard their heads are (or how junky the G5 head is).

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

I beg ur pardon? I make the best tree rat tips & gravy in my neck of the woods. I'd lay odds that I've ate more wild game than you will your entire lifetime.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Tree squirrels have a number of adaptations for coping with the winter, including, but not limited to: food caching, lowered metabolism, thermo-regulation in micro-climates, torpor (frequent periods of lowered metabolism, lowered body temperature, and inactivity), and group nesting. There are very few true hibernators.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from squirrelhunter7 wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Gray, fox, and red squirrels don't sleep threw the winter. They sleep longer, But dont hibernate

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from CarliusD0 wrote 4 years 20 weeks ago

round squirrels (like chipmunks and prairie dogs) live in ground burrows, and many become dormant in winter (hibernate). Tree squirrels genera contains most of the common, bushy-tailed squirrels in North America, Europe, Asia, and South America, which prefer the heights of the trees, as opposed to ground squirrels, and spend little time on the ground.

Tree squirrels do not hibernate during the winter months, but they keep all activities to a minimum to conserve energy. Hence, they often seem to almost completely disappear during the winter months. Winter tree nests (called dreys) are often shared for warmth where tree squirrels keep warm by snuggling with their family members. When they sleep, they use their big furry tails to cover themselves to keep as warm as possible. A squirrel will come out now and then to search for hidden stores of food.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from grant77 wrote 3 years 40 weeks ago

nooooooooooo

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

Fox squirrels are active all winter and feed actively over the deep snow in the frozen tundra of the midwest. Their fur gets real thick and they put on fat for the winter.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

>I beg ur pardon? I make the best tree rat tips & gravy

Excuse me then, but you are not invited to join our foundation [Americans for Squirrel at Every Dinner Table] if you keep calling them rats [g]. Donations accepted.

>squirrels have a number of adaptations
>for coping with the winter

I was hoping we would hear from Bioguy!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from LesserSon wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

You guys are skirting the issue: would you eat a rat?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

>would you eat a rat?

AFSAEDT opposes this kind of conversation, sir, but if I knew a rat was eating nothing but hickory nuts I could be pretty sure it'd be fine if I could get over the idea.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Elmer Fudd wrote 4 years 27 weeks ago

changing that foundation name to ASEDT, pronounced "asset" [g]

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from flintlock62 wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Wouldn't eat the species of rat that hangs out around garbage cans, but tree squirrels have a very different diet and are only in the rodent family.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

bmxbiz-fs