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The Ten Best Best Bargains In Shotgunning

In this recession, bargains are everywhere—if you’re shopping for pickups and plasma TVs. Guns and ammunition are the exception, still selling fast in the wake of the November election. According to the National Shooting Sports Foundation, sales in the first quarter of ’09 were 27.1 percent higher than in the first quarter of ’08. Even in this down economy, you may not find the gun of your dreams red-tagged and gathering dust on your dealer’s shelf.

There are still wise buys beyond the basic 870 Express and Mossberg 500, however. Several products give you an excellent return on your dollar, and that’s very important right now. Here are shotgunning’s top 10 values, from the most expensive to the least:

[1] Beretta 682 Gold E Beretta isn’t normally considered a “bargain” brand but rates two entries on this list because they have learned something about gunmaking after nearly 500 years in business. My first pick, the 682 o/u, has taken shooters to the pinnacle of the shotgun sports—the top of the Olympic medal stand—competing against guns costing more than twice as much. The 682 features a durable, low-profile action that makes it both lively and strong. The barrel shoulders and other action parts are replaceable, so this is the last target gun you’ll ever have to buy. It’s available in trap, skeet, and sporting models. Starting at $4,075; berettausa.com

[2] Browning BT-99 Browning discontinued this classic break-action single-shot in 1994, then reintroduced it in 2001 as a plain-finished, extractor-only version at a lower price. It doesn’t look quite as good as the original, but it shoots better, with a backbored barrel and Invector-Plus chokes. $1,329; browning.com

[3] Beretta 3901 When Beretta replaced the 390 autoloader with the 391, they sent the old machinery to Maryland and started building a plain, budget-priced model called the 3901. As a 391 owner, it pains me to admit that the 390/3901 is every bit as good a gun and a little sturdier. Its reputation for high-volume, low-recoil durability on sporting clays ranges and Argentine dove fields is well deserved. Starting at $850; ­beretta​usa.com

[4] CZ Bobwhite A classic double with a price tag that reads like a misprint, the Turkish Bobwhite is popular with bird hunters who have always yearned for a double but couldn’t afford one. The woodwork is good, and its lines are slim. Each gauge is built on its own proportional frame, making the small bores delightful. $789; cz-usa.com

[5] Baikal MP153 Known for the past few years as the Remington SPR453, the MP153 is back with its original importer and its original name. The MP153 is what you would expect a 31⁄2-inch, 12-gauge Russian auto­loader to be: plain, low-tech (you have to adjust it to shoot light and heavy loads), and as solidly reliable as a T-34 tank. $605; ussginc.com

[6] A Shooting Lesson You can burn ammo on your own until your shoulder bleeds, or take a shortcut and get better fast by taking a lesson from a professional. A one-day session yields huge results. You’ll have fun, you’ll improve, and most important, you’ll learn to diagnose your own misses. $385–$535; orvis.com or ospschool.com

[7] Winchester Xpert High Velocity Steel Inside 40 yards, a duck or goose won’t know if it’s been shot with Xpert steel, premium steel, or pricey tungsten-iron. These pellets, made by a cost-saving proprietary process, are misshapen but fast and deadly, achieving velocities up to 1550 fps. Available in 23⁄4-, 3-, and 31⁄2-inch lengths in 12 gauge; and 3-inch in 20 gauge. $15–$22 per box of 25; winchester.com

[8] Combat Arms Range Plugs Worn yellow side out, they work like conventional earplugs. Turn them around, and a tiny plastic filter allows normal sounds to pass but shuts out sudden, loud noises. Wearing these inexpensive hearing protectors in the field (stick with plugs and muffs at the range) will save you money in hearing aids down the road. When someone touches off a shot next to your ear in the duck blind, you’ll be glad you’re wearing these. $14 a pair; aosafety.com

[9] Federal TruBall Slugs Before you drop a bundle on a rifled gun and sabots, try TruBall slugs in your smoothbore. A plastic ball in the hollow back end helps the full-bore slug expand concentrically upon firing. The TruBall shoots very well; my unrifled Ithaca 37 prints sub-2-inch groups with them at 50 yards. Available in 12 and 20 gauge. $6 per box of 5; federalpremium.com

[10] Gun Mounts You can become a better shot without spending a dime. With an unloaded gun, stand in a ready position, look at a spot on the wall, and concentrate on raising the stock to your cheek first, not to your shoulder, as you point the muzzle at your target. Also, start with an unmounted gun and pretend to shoot crossers; trace the juncture of the wall and ceiling as you mount the gun. Spending 10 to 15 minutes a day on gun mounts will improve your shooting far more than a new gun will.

Comments (32)

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from dpervorse wrote 4 years 36 weeks ago

Although I would love to have that Beretta 682 Gold E, I don't see it as much of a bargain. I understand you are comparing it to much more expensive O/U's but there has to be a good O/E that is more of a bargain for those of us that would have to give up 5 mortgage payments just to make a down payment on this gun.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from cbalax09 wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

I always love these articles because I don't have a whole lot of money to spend so this is great information.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hunt_Hard wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I really don't see much of a bargain with the Beretta but the Winchester Xpert High Velocity Steel is a great deal! Good info...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Buck wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I wish a $4000. Beretta seemed a bargain to me, but there is still some good information here. I hunt deer with a rifle, but I've been interested in the Federal TruBall slugs since they were introduced. I have low profile sights on my rib and often take a few slugs with me when bird hunting; I sometimes see a coyote... When I've remember to look for the TruBall slugs, I've never found them in stock; they must be good.

Buck@score-your-hunting.com

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from micropterus wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

That settles it. I'm going to the bank tomorrow to get a loan so I can hop on some of these bargains while they are still cheap. But I guess a $4,000 Beretta is a bargain compared to an $8,000 something-I've-never-heard-of. Kind of like how a used B2 Bomber can be had for $1 billion, whereas a new one would set you back $2 billion. That's like half price!!!

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from vtbluegrass wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

How did the Stoeger 2000 not make the bargain list? For waterfowlers who may want a Benelli but hat the price tag the Stoeger is a great option. No gas tubes to keep clean or dry the Stoeger is the best autoloader bargain out there. You don't have to adjust it for light and heavy loads like the Baikal either. You can find them for as little as $430 in black, $475 in camo, and you can get a combo with two barrels(rifle slug and standard) for $525.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from bigjake wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I wouldnt recocmend Stoeger products to my worst enemy, anything they make is junk, Ive had a brand new Stoeger Condor's stock explode on me the first time it was used...They will never get another penny from me.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from dtagit wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

I too cannot afford the bargain Berretta; wanting an 20 gauge o/u, i'm looking at the Savage Milano, CZUSA Redhead deluxe, Verona???; anyone have any experience with these shotguns or recommend another affordable option? Thanks for any info.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from gene123 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

I agree that the Stoeger M2000 should have made the list. But well ahead of it should be the H&R Topper and, for deer hunters required to use slug guns, the H&R Ultra Slug Hunter, which retails for under $400 and shoots sabot slugs into neat 2-inch clusters at 200 yards. And why was Remington's new pump gun not mentioned? Fits and shoots as well as an 870. Suggested retail of the black synthetic 887 as $399, which means street price will be closer to $300. And does the $4,000 Beretta 682 Gold shoot better than the $1,500 black Onyx. I doubt it.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from gene123 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

make that shoots sabot slugs into neat clusters @ 200 yards.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from gene123 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Did it again. I meant 100 yards.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from gene123 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Did it again. I meant 100 yards.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from gene123 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Did it again. I meant 100 yards.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from gene123 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

what is wrong with this site?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from finsfan wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

As for the CZ products...I purchased their 20 guage sxs (Ringneck) and I love it. For the money ($750 on Gunbroker) it's light to carry, quick and easy to shoulder and overall a nice looking alternative to it's expensive cousins. I bought it only after buying a CZ American 204 rifle which I would not part with for any amount. The most accurate, flat shooting weapon in my arsenal.
Jimbo

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from sandyrossartist wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

The people who don't understand the bargain in the 682 o/u beretta need to take a second look. Even though inflation is rampant, the 682 is still selling for about what it sold for when it first came out. It IS the only shotgun you would ever need to buy. Parts are replaceable. Check out the winner's guns in big competition shoots from the time the gun was introduced. And last but not least, it is a delightful gun to shoot. It's balance and feel is comparable to crawling into a new Mercedes and smelling the new leather for the first time.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from woodturner52 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

To dtaqit, I purchased a Verona last year, went down had it fitted and have sent over 2000 rounds through it and I am really satisfied. The only thing I do not like is after you break it open it has a tendacy to slightly close at the breach making loading bottom barrel a problem. Otherwise very happy.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Eagle15 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Come on folks give the man a break on his assessment of the Beretta 682E. I think you are missing the point; He is talking about a gun designed for Competition Shooting, not shooting doves, although it will accomplish either tasking with ease. You can purchase one of these guns used, tubed, and cased to compete in all four gauges for the MSRP he quoted. I own everything from a mossberg 500 to a 682E Skeet. I have also owned Krieghoff K80's and Perazzi's. My K80 was valued at about $13,000.00 and my 12 & 20 Remington 1100 Skeet B's cost about #175.00 a piece. Care to guess which I won more tournaments with, you guessed it the Remingtons. I personally think it was a +5 comment. How many of you guys own a $30K 4 wheel drive, that has never even been put into 4 wheel drive except during the test drive. Be Honest

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from sduprey wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

For people concerned with the report on the beretta 682E: if youre looking for a reliable, handsome O/U that isn't specifically for competition shooting, check out the Ruger Red Label O/U's. While I am a beretta owner, I have found the red labels to be fairly similar to berettas in terms of dependability, performance, and workmanship. while they aren't cheap, they're about $1800 new I think, and I have seen good used ones offered for just over $1000. Still very expensive, but a better deal than the berettas, for sure.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from philbourjaily wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

All -- I can't afford $4000 shotguns either, but if I were going to devote myself to training for a spot on the Olympic team, I'd be saving up for a 682E. As for the omission of the NEF/H&R single shot slug gun, I wholeheartedly agree it belongs on this list. However, I have covered it in other parts of the magazine recently (June 2009's "Five Recession-Proof Shotguns") so I tried to find other bargain guns to take its place here.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from chubar wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

We picked up a new H&R Excell 5 semi-auto 12 ga at Bass Pro for $299.95 (in black) yesterday. Comes with 4 chokes. Took it out today and put several boxes of varied power factory & reloads through it on the 5 stand course. During second box had one "failure to feed" (ejected the empty but didn't pick up the next shell). No problems after that except that barrel gets REALLY hot BUT we were both shooting, swapping off. I usually shoot a Citory O/U so recoil from this one was not too much- wife shoots an 1100 so this recoil was maybe a little more, but the gun is several ounces lighter also. I am usually pretty sorry on the 5 stand course- maybe had a few more hits today so it definitely shoots as well as I can. All that for less than 300 bucks. THAT's what I call a bargain.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from chubar wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Another good value for the dollar is the Remington 1100- but I just found out that they are running about $1050 for the Sport 12- with wood stock instead of plastic. They are rugged and reliable and will give years of service- and parts are still available if you need them. We shoot competitive sporting clays and feel that it is one of the best semi-autos out there for this sport- as do several of the guys we shoot with. And, you can buy four new ones for the price of the Beretta so you can have one for each season. Good used ones are available for a lot less if you check around. We have a 16 ga that is over 45 years old and a 12 ga that is over 30 years old- and we put MANY boxes through them each week in practice- still holding up great.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from bigjake wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

I agree with chubar, the 1100 is a great shotgun, Ive owned a 20 gauge model 1100 for 14 years and it has never let me down.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from sandyrossartist wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

When you go to the tournaments, you're going to have a hard time convincing the referees to let you shoot your 12 gauge Remington
1100 in the 20, 28, and 410 competition. And light weight is great for hunting and carrying it through the woods, etc, but the old shoulder is going to be very painful after shooting 100 shells through that light baby with another 100 rounds due that afternoon. The Beretta 682 is the most affordable,durable gun for that. I'm not sure I would want to take a 9 pound gun on a dove hunt, but to shoot skeet, it is a real bargain. I believe the writer of the article was talking about the gun that would take you to the Olympic medal stand--that would be competition shooting.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from gene123 wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

The Ruger Red Label is an outstanding gun. I am not a competition shooter but a hunter, and I've dropped many a duck and dove with the 12-ga RL. I had a set of Briley 28-gauge subgauge tubes for a while. They made the gun a bit heavy, but boy was it fun to shoot. I've also shot clays with the RL 28, which is built on a 28-ga. frame, not a 20 or 12. A lot of folks believe it's the best Red Label made, and I won't argue the point.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from SD_Whitetail_Hntr wrote 4 years 31 weeks ago

So Many great points in the posts here I'm not sure I can add any about shotguns. For the record I've been completely convinced my Ruger Red Label O/U is the only gun I'll ever need. I did however want to mention my experience with the Xpert High Velocity Steel has been terrible at best. The only shell I'll use of that type is 3 1/2 inch that would seem like four shot sizes too much for what I'm shooting. I'll credit the fact that they mention shooting birds under 40 yards as part of the deal but I'm going to bump that down to 30 yards as my recommendation.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from nerffodder wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

Im gonna get one of those mp153's. Sounds like a much better deal then the stoeger. Right?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jason rieke wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

I bought a full camo spr 453 at Dicks Sporting goods for $399. I haven't used it yet but i've talked to people who have had alot of success with it. Check out this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--GbVKwDfNU.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Rangerider wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

I bought a 20ga. CZ Bobwhite this summer. I had about ten to pick from and I got the one that found my eye the best when I shouldered it. It's a pretty good shotgun for the price. I like it a lot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 3030forlife wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

The truball slugs are definitley a great deal!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from New Age Bubba wrote 4 years 1 week ago

If you are considering, or already own, a Remington 1100/870/87 this book is invaluable. Or, get to know your gunsmith!

The Remington M870 and M1100/M11-87 Shotguns: A Shop Manual (Paperback)
~ Jerry Kuhnhausen (Author)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from feltcheeks wrote 3 years 5 days ago

whoa...I was thinking 300-400 dollars for a bargain shotgun...

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from micropterus wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

That settles it. I'm going to the bank tomorrow to get a loan so I can hop on some of these bargains while they are still cheap. But I guess a $4,000 Beretta is a bargain compared to an $8,000 something-I've-never-heard-of. Kind of like how a used B2 Bomber can be had for $1 billion, whereas a new one would set you back $2 billion. That's like half price!!!

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Eagle15 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Come on folks give the man a break on his assessment of the Beretta 682E. I think you are missing the point; He is talking about a gun designed for Competition Shooting, not shooting doves, although it will accomplish either tasking with ease. You can purchase one of these guns used, tubed, and cased to compete in all four gauges for the MSRP he quoted. I own everything from a mossberg 500 to a 682E Skeet. I have also owned Krieghoff K80's and Perazzi's. My K80 was valued at about $13,000.00 and my 12 & 20 Remington 1100 Skeet B's cost about #175.00 a piece. Care to guess which I won more tournaments with, you guessed it the Remingtons. I personally think it was a +5 comment. How many of you guys own a $30K 4 wheel drive, that has never even been put into 4 wheel drive except during the test drive. Be Honest

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from bigjake wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

I agree with chubar, the 1100 is a great shotgun, Ive owned a 20 gauge model 1100 for 14 years and it has never let me down.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from dpervorse wrote 4 years 36 weeks ago

Although I would love to have that Beretta 682 Gold E, I don't see it as much of a bargain. I understand you are comparing it to much more expensive O/U's but there has to be a good O/E that is more of a bargain for those of us that would have to give up 5 mortgage payments just to make a down payment on this gun.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from cbalax09 wrote 4 years 35 weeks ago

I always love these articles because I don't have a whole lot of money to spend so this is great information.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from chubar wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Another good value for the dollar is the Remington 1100- but I just found out that they are running about $1050 for the Sport 12- with wood stock instead of plastic. They are rugged and reliable and will give years of service- and parts are still available if you need them. We shoot competitive sporting clays and feel that it is one of the best semi-autos out there for this sport- as do several of the guys we shoot with. And, you can buy four new ones for the price of the Beretta so you can have one for each season. Good used ones are available for a lot less if you check around. We have a 16 ga that is over 45 years old and a 12 ga that is over 30 years old- and we put MANY boxes through them each week in practice- still holding up great.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Buck wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I wish a $4000. Beretta seemed a bargain to me, but there is still some good information here. I hunt deer with a rifle, but I've been interested in the Federal TruBall slugs since they were introduced. I have low profile sights on my rib and often take a few slugs with me when bird hunting; I sometimes see a coyote... When I've remember to look for the TruBall slugs, I've never found them in stock; they must be good.

Buck@score-your-hunting.com

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from bigjake wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I wouldnt recocmend Stoeger products to my worst enemy, anything they make is junk, Ive had a brand new Stoeger Condor's stock explode on me the first time it was used...They will never get another penny from me.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from philbourjaily wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

All -- I can't afford $4000 shotguns either, but if I were going to devote myself to training for a spot on the Olympic team, I'd be saving up for a 682E. As for the omission of the NEF/H&R single shot slug gun, I wholeheartedly agree it belongs on this list. However, I have covered it in other parts of the magazine recently (June 2009's "Five Recession-Proof Shotguns") so I tried to find other bargain guns to take its place here.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from chubar wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

We picked up a new H&R Excell 5 semi-auto 12 ga at Bass Pro for $299.95 (in black) yesterday. Comes with 4 chokes. Took it out today and put several boxes of varied power factory & reloads through it on the 5 stand course. During second box had one "failure to feed" (ejected the empty but didn't pick up the next shell). No problems after that except that barrel gets REALLY hot BUT we were both shooting, swapping off. I usually shoot a Citory O/U so recoil from this one was not too much- wife shoots an 1100 so this recoil was maybe a little more, but the gun is several ounces lighter also. I am usually pretty sorry on the 5 stand course- maybe had a few more hits today so it definitely shoots as well as I can. All that for less than 300 bucks. THAT's what I call a bargain.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hunt_Hard wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

I really don't see much of a bargain with the Beretta but the Winchester Xpert High Velocity Steel is a great deal! Good info...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from vtbluegrass wrote 4 years 34 weeks ago

How did the Stoeger 2000 not make the bargain list? For waterfowlers who may want a Benelli but hat the price tag the Stoeger is a great option. No gas tubes to keep clean or dry the Stoeger is the best autoloader bargain out there. You don't have to adjust it for light and heavy loads like the Baikal either. You can find them for as little as $430 in black, $475 in camo, and you can get a combo with two barrels(rifle slug and standard) for $525.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from dtagit wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

I too cannot afford the bargain Berretta; wanting an 20 gauge o/u, i'm looking at the Savage Milano, CZUSA Redhead deluxe, Verona???; anyone have any experience with these shotguns or recommend another affordable option? Thanks for any info.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from gene123 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

I agree that the Stoeger M2000 should have made the list. But well ahead of it should be the H&R Topper and, for deer hunters required to use slug guns, the H&R Ultra Slug Hunter, which retails for under $400 and shoots sabot slugs into neat 2-inch clusters at 200 yards. And why was Remington's new pump gun not mentioned? Fits and shoots as well as an 870. Suggested retail of the black synthetic 887 as $399, which means street price will be closer to $300. And does the $4,000 Beretta 682 Gold shoot better than the $1,500 black Onyx. I doubt it.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from gene123 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

make that shoots sabot slugs into neat clusters @ 200 yards.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from gene123 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Did it again. I meant 100 yards.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from gene123 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

what is wrong with this site?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from finsfan wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

As for the CZ products...I purchased their 20 guage sxs (Ringneck) and I love it. For the money ($750 on Gunbroker) it's light to carry, quick and easy to shoulder and overall a nice looking alternative to it's expensive cousins. I bought it only after buying a CZ American 204 rifle which I would not part with for any amount. The most accurate, flat shooting weapon in my arsenal.
Jimbo

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from sandyrossartist wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

The people who don't understand the bargain in the 682 o/u beretta need to take a second look. Even though inflation is rampant, the 682 is still selling for about what it sold for when it first came out. It IS the only shotgun you would ever need to buy. Parts are replaceable. Check out the winner's guns in big competition shoots from the time the gun was introduced. And last but not least, it is a delightful gun to shoot. It's balance and feel is comparable to crawling into a new Mercedes and smelling the new leather for the first time.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from woodturner52 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

To dtaqit, I purchased a Verona last year, went down had it fitted and have sent over 2000 rounds through it and I am really satisfied. The only thing I do not like is after you break it open it has a tendacy to slightly close at the breach making loading bottom barrel a problem. Otherwise very happy.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from sduprey wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

For people concerned with the report on the beretta 682E: if youre looking for a reliable, handsome O/U that isn't specifically for competition shooting, check out the Ruger Red Label O/U's. While I am a beretta owner, I have found the red labels to be fairly similar to berettas in terms of dependability, performance, and workmanship. while they aren't cheap, they're about $1800 new I think, and I have seen good used ones offered for just over $1000. Still very expensive, but a better deal than the berettas, for sure.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from gene123 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Did it again. I meant 100 yards.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from gene123 wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Did it again. I meant 100 yards.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from sandyrossartist wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

When you go to the tournaments, you're going to have a hard time convincing the referees to let you shoot your 12 gauge Remington
1100 in the 20, 28, and 410 competition. And light weight is great for hunting and carrying it through the woods, etc, but the old shoulder is going to be very painful after shooting 100 shells through that light baby with another 100 rounds due that afternoon. The Beretta 682 is the most affordable,durable gun for that. I'm not sure I would want to take a 9 pound gun on a dove hunt, but to shoot skeet, it is a real bargain. I believe the writer of the article was talking about the gun that would take you to the Olympic medal stand--that would be competition shooting.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from gene123 wrote 4 years 32 weeks ago

The Ruger Red Label is an outstanding gun. I am not a competition shooter but a hunter, and I've dropped many a duck and dove with the 12-ga RL. I had a set of Briley 28-gauge subgauge tubes for a while. They made the gun a bit heavy, but boy was it fun to shoot. I've also shot clays with the RL 28, which is built on a 28-ga. frame, not a 20 or 12. A lot of folks believe it's the best Red Label made, and I won't argue the point.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from SD_Whitetail_Hntr wrote 4 years 31 weeks ago

So Many great points in the posts here I'm not sure I can add any about shotguns. For the record I've been completely convinced my Ruger Red Label O/U is the only gun I'll ever need. I did however want to mention my experience with the Xpert High Velocity Steel has been terrible at best. The only shell I'll use of that type is 3 1/2 inch that would seem like four shot sizes too much for what I'm shooting. I'll credit the fact that they mention shooting birds under 40 yards as part of the deal but I'm going to bump that down to 30 yards as my recommendation.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from nerffodder wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

Im gonna get one of those mp153's. Sounds like a much better deal then the stoeger. Right?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jason rieke wrote 4 years 29 weeks ago

I bought a full camo spr 453 at Dicks Sporting goods for $399. I haven't used it yet but i've talked to people who have had alot of success with it. Check out this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--GbVKwDfNU.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Rangerider wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

I bought a 20ga. CZ Bobwhite this summer. I had about ten to pick from and I got the one that found my eye the best when I shouldered it. It's a pretty good shotgun for the price. I like it a lot.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 3030forlife wrote 4 years 17 weeks ago

The truball slugs are definitley a great deal!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from New Age Bubba wrote 4 years 1 week ago

If you are considering, or already own, a Remington 1100/870/87 this book is invaluable. Or, get to know your gunsmith!

The Remington M870 and M1100/M11-87 Shotguns: A Shop Manual (Paperback)
~ Jerry Kuhnhausen (Author)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from feltcheeks wrote 3 years 5 days ago

whoa...I was thinking 300-400 dollars for a bargain shotgun...

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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