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Wild Turkey Recipe: How to Cook Wild Turkey Pot Pie

On the day after Thanksgiving, use this recipe to cook your leftover turkey with squash and herbs.

Banish all memories of the frozen, supermarket pot pies you ate in childhood. This pie boasts an ultraflaky crust that caps a luscious mixture of winter squash, herbs, and wild turkey. If using leftover cooked turkey, skip the browning.

1. Make the dough: In a food processor, pulse together the flour, pepper, and salt, then scatter in the butter and pulse until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Sprinkle in the ice water and pulse again, until the dough starts to come together and pull away from the sides. Transfer it to a floured surface. You should be able to form it into a shaggy ball, but add more cold water—a tablespoon at a time—if it won’t come together. Flatten the ball into a thick disk, wrap in plastic wrap, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.

2. Make the filling: Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Heat 2 tablespoons of the olive oil over medium-high heat in a sauté pan. Generously salt and pepper the turkey. Add it to the pan and cook, stirring once in a while, until browned. Set the turkey aside. Add the remaining tablespoon of oil to the pan along with the garlic, celery, and squash, and cook until the vegetables soften. Set aside.

Meanwhile, cook the pearl onions: Bring about a quart of water to boil in a medium saucepan. Peel the onions, leaving the root end intact so that they don’t unravel. Boil them for about 10 minutes, then drain and let cool in cold water. When cool enough to handle, slice off the root ends.

Bring the stock to a boil in a small pot. In a saucepan over medium heat, melt the butter. Whisk in the flour for 1 minute. Then add the stock, milk, and cream. Once it boils, turn the heat down to low and let simmer—whisking all the while—for about 5 minutes, or until thickened. Add the chopped rosemary and season with salt and pepper.

3. Assemble the pie: Add the turkey and vegetables to a large baking dish, followed by the cream mixture. Stir gently to combine. Roll out the dough on a lightly floured surface to form a circle (or oval, depending on your dish) about an inch wider than the diameter of the dish. Drape it over the dish and pinch the edge into a sealed rim. Use a sharp knife to pop vents in the top.

Make an egg wash by mixing the egg with 2 tablespoons of water. Brush the top with this mixture, then bake the pie for 40 minutes, or until the crust is golden. Serves 6.

Ingredients
Crust
11/2 cups all-purpose flour
1 to 11/2 tsp. freshly cracked black pepper
1/2 tsp. salt
1 stick (1/2 cup) chilled unsalted butter, cubed
1/2 cup ice water
1 egg, for egg wash

Filling
21/2 lb. boneless, skinless wild turkey meat, cut into 1-inch pieces
3 Tbsp. olive oil
3 garlic cloves, minced
3 celery ribs, diced
1 cup butternut squash, diced
1 cup pearl onions
5 Tbsp. butter
1⁄2 cup all-purpose flour
3 cups chicken stock
1 cup milk
1/3 cup light cream
3 Tbsp. fresh rosemary

 

Comments (8)

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from prairieghost wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

this may be one of the few recipes that makes wild turkey edible. taste has never been the issue with the wild birds, but their toughness.

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from Brian W. Thair wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Wild turkey is just like ribs and brisket: long, slow, low cooking does the job (3-6+hrs, maybe 225-250F, keep moist). Melt-in-your-mouth yummy.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from coho310 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Mmmmmmmmm!Looks good,I hope it helps the wild turkey take on some tenderness and flavor,'cause otherwise,yuck!

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from jlfkb2 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

try marinating wild turkey breast chunks in italian dressing and wrapped in bacon, then grill. As long as the pieces aren't too big they cook up very tasty

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Wild turkey needs to be fileted and the separate pieces cooked differently for best results. This pot pie is good.

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from Bass2Buck wrote 3 years 28 weeks ago

Im gonna have a pot pie feast after turkey season!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Graycoat Storm wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

Killer! I've made a lot of gamebird pies--there are some terrific pie recipes in the L.L. Bean Cookbook (the Bible of fish and game cuisine)--but this one ranks with the best. Putting black pepper in the crust is a stroke of genius. I saved a step by using frozen pearl onions, adding them to the skillet with the other vegetables so they'd soften and brown, and while I'm sure fresh rosemary would be better I used dried (a smaller quantity, of course) and it worked out fine. Next time I believe I'll add a little sage--always good with turkey--and maybe a few crumbled threads of saffron. And I don't see why it wouldn't be just as good with pheasant.

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from billyjo bondurant wrote 2 years 36 weeks ago

I was looking for a turkey recipe.

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Post a Comment

from Brian W. Thair wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Wild turkey is just like ribs and brisket: long, slow, low cooking does the job (3-6+hrs, maybe 225-250F, keep moist). Melt-in-your-mouth yummy.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jlfkb2 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

try marinating wild turkey breast chunks in italian dressing and wrapped in bacon, then grill. As long as the pieces aren't too big they cook up very tasty

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bass2Buck wrote 3 years 28 weeks ago

Im gonna have a pot pie feast after turkey season!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from prairieghost wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

this may be one of the few recipes that makes wild turkey edible. taste has never been the issue with the wild birds, but their toughness.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from coho310 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Mmmmmmmmm!Looks good,I hope it helps the wild turkey take on some tenderness and flavor,'cause otherwise,yuck!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from charlie elk wrote 4 years 21 weeks ago

Wild turkey needs to be fileted and the separate pieces cooked differently for best results. This pot pie is good.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Graycoat Storm wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

Killer! I've made a lot of gamebird pies--there are some terrific pie recipes in the L.L. Bean Cookbook (the Bible of fish and game cuisine)--but this one ranks with the best. Putting black pepper in the crust is a stroke of genius. I saved a step by using frozen pearl onions, adding them to the skillet with the other vegetables so they'd soften and brown, and while I'm sure fresh rosemary would be better I used dried (a smaller quantity, of course) and it worked out fine. Next time I believe I'll add a little sage--always good with turkey--and maybe a few crumbled threads of saffron. And I don't see why it wouldn't be just as good with pheasant.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from billyjo bondurant wrote 2 years 36 weeks ago

I was looking for a turkey recipe.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment