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An Expert Gunsmith on Over-Pressure Rounds and Exploding Handguns

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November 04, 2009

An Expert Gunsmith on Over-Pressure Rounds and Exploding Handguns

By David E. Petzal

A note to all you Gun Nuts: The photo below (and three more, which you can see by clicking here) came into my inbox attached to the following caption:

"For those of you who load your own ammunition...
 
A guy came into our department the other day to ask a favor. He had a Smith & Wesson Model 629 that he wanted to dispose of after a mishap at the range. He said there was a loud bang when he tested his new load and the gun smacked him in the forehead, leaving a nice gash. When the tweety birds cleared, this is what he saw..."

Rather than comment on these photos myself, I decided they were serious enough that they deserved something intelligent said about them, so I sent them to my friend and ace pistolsmith John Blauvelt. Here's what he had to say.  --David Petzal

Begin forwarded message:
From: JC Blauvelt
Date: October 30, 2009 8:09:43 PM EST
To: Dave Petzal

Subject: BANG

Dave, Well you asked for it. I hope you find this useful. Thank you for the opportunity.

A graphic reminder of the art of home pressure testing. What I see here is typical of a vastly over-pressure round fired in a revolver. The in-line round of ammunition blew out the top of the cylinder, both adjoining chambers, and removed the top strap.  Most of the destroyed revolvers I have seen usually have the top strap of the frame still attached at the front, above the barrel, and it is peeled forward. The weakest point of an adjustable sight revolver frame is the back end of the top strap were the rear sight cut is. In this revolver the whole top strap is gone and most of both adjoining chambers. This points to a very strong pressure spike. How did it happen? One clue is the reloader’s quote that he was “testing his new load.” So, it is most likely the reloader's fault. He was either trying to make a “Super Magnum” load beyond the recommended loads or used the wrong powder - i.e.  grabbed a can of 231 instead of 296 or possibly changed powders and forgot to change the settings on the powder measure. A barrel obstruction from a squib round? I do not believe so. I do not see any indication of a bulge in the barrel. Unless it was a bullet from a squib round stuck just forward of the back end of the barrel.  In any case, these are sobering photos. Look at the amount of shrapnel that let loose. It could have caused grave injuries to the shooter and/or bystanders on either side of him. An expensive lesson learned, and fortunately no one was injured.

For all the millions of rounds of ammunition reloaded each year, it is rare to see this happen. That's why it makes news when it does. Always remember to check, double check, then check one more time that the recipe you are using is correct, wear your safety glasses, and ear protection.  Also, in this guy’s case, he likely needed a half of a bottle of aspirin for his headache. 

JC Blauvelt Gunsmith, Inc.
www.JCBgunsmith.com

Comments (94)

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from jeffo52284 wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

wow im glad no one was seriously injured. this is why reloading makes me nervous

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from thuroy wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Wow!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from bluecollarkid wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Why is the "on deck" round blown up? Did the over pressure round in the chamber cause the "on deck" round to fire?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bluecollarkid wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Nevermind.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from idduckhntr wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I know a guy who purpossly tried to blow up a Super black in 45 Colt to duplicate 454 vel firsst he used 2400 then used 4227. I dont know what ever happend to see once in awhile and he still had both hands and all his fingers. When I told him how crazy he was he just laughed and said he knew what he was doing. Funny thing is this guy routingly freezes rifle bolts up from over loading.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

THIS is why the "books" say DO NOT exceed recomendations !

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from idahooutdoors wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

A waste of a nice gun....that is another reason I'm not a big fan of max loads...some people re-load to push the envelope, others like me, do it to save money and tweek accuracy...I'm usually a fan of moderate loads, guns, powder, and brass end up lasting longer, and for the most part they are just as deadly and usually more accurate...

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from ckRich wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

DOH!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

That is some serious damage. No doubt this guy was lucky as well as the people standing near.

I think my limited knowledge of reloading keeps me safe from trying dangerous stuff like that. I read the book and move slowly. Somewhere along the line this guy thought he was above the rules.

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ruckweiler wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Sometimes, the problem with Americans is in the old adage "some is good, more is better." We try to make everything bigger. Boobs, handloads, and hot rod engines are among that list.

+10 Good Comment? | | Report
from seadog wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Wow. That's the worst blowout I've ever seen. This is a good safety lesson for people like me that are thinking of taking up reloading and for those of you that already reload and are thinking about pushing the limits.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Bet he is looking for his "sign"! I'm glad he wasn't killed.

I don't reload handgun ammo, but I always keep rifle loads below the maximum by at least 0.3 grain regardless of pressure indications and velocity. Seldom will you get into real trouble following instructions.

However, I recently had some loads exhibit signs of overpressure following the manual AND below max loads listed and using the primer listed. After reducing several times and still seeing overpressure signs, I found the Federal GM215M primer to be the culprit. No such problem with WLRM and CCI 250 primers in this load.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I NEVER approach rvrn the rcommrndrd max load, just for that reason, I load light .

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

&%$#, recommended !! Fat fingers again.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jjas wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I see this stuff all the time. Guys pushing the envelope thinking they are smarter that the people who do this stuff for a living.

This guy is lucky to be alive. I'm just surprised he's not trying to sue S&W, the case manufacturer, the gun powder company, the primer maker, his mother, etc....

What a dumba$$.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from yohan wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Friend of mine ( 12-14) years ago who was ( and is ) just about as handy ( mechanical) as cub bear with flintlock on windy day,.decided he would handload
So,. like evrything in his life, he jumped in with both feet while still 1/2 cocked.

He mostly faniced himself as a pistoleer,.. and fired many many rounds,.many of which he reloaded.

One day he was tired ,.but decided to include a box of his special( dip stick brand) home rolled wad cutters in a deal he made to sell a chrome s & w 44 mag
Dont recall the model. But it was a prety pistol as I remeber it .Ivory grips ,. the whole she-bang as it were

A few days later the guy who bought the pistol from ole dip stick, showed up with the pistol.
Which was opened up like a can of beans left on fire with out poking holoes in it, a small bandage on his head .and a few stitches in his hand

The pistol buyer's ssuggestion was that if in fact ole dip stick the pistoleer and reloader par exa-lanse
Would consider refunding his money he would consider not sueing him for everthing he had or ever would have.
Part of this reasoniong was that that he ( pistol buyer) was partly at fault for trusting the source of the relaods to begin with.

Of course "ole dip stick" the pistoleer was incenced at first,.. as it seemd impossible to him. That as infalable as he had become in his lengthy (6 month) career as a pistoleer and reloader. anything remotly ( incorrect ) with anything he did in that arena could not possibly happen.

He ( ole dip stick) forth with called me as council (not legal council but advisor) after hearing the story ,.I suggested he peel off the cabbage and then some forth with,. and that if he didnt.
Do not ecpect me to come visit him the the jail where they keep terminal idiots and 1/2 cocked reloaders and pistoleers.

Ole dip stick had in his infalable but reduced state of conciousness " tired " maybe understatement,.
as he is not adverse to a cocktail or 4 before dinning,..

Had double charged the rounds with the wrong powder.

Bang is F ing right !!!

He slipped the noose on that one.
After which I suggested possibly he might consider curtailing his relaoding activity and distribution of same to unsuspsting membes of society ,.. and furhter
to concoct only that which he himslef intended discharge .
Not known nationally for his genius ,. he did however decern the intrinsic logic and has as far as I know ,. not blown up anything or anyone else since.

I handload ( have for 30 year) but I am repectfully fearfull.
Hows bout u guys ?

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Pushing the Maximum is nothing new and how they are doing it isn’t new either. Like what was said, either a squib round, wrong powder or just overloaded. But like I said, how they are doing it isn’t new either! I have come across other reloaders who just scare the hell out of me, toss the scale up on the table zero it out set the powder measure and weigh every 5th or so case or just go for broke and I’ve seen some walk up to the shooting table with resizing lubricant just dripping off the cartridge and bullet and you can bet they didn’t get to shoot until they wiped the case off to my satisfaction. As some of you know, I do red line some of my loads yet they are still safe. What differs between my loads versus others, I weigh each and every round and when I finish charging all 50 cases I inspect and reinspect the level of powder for consistency and recheck the scale for accuracy. Before I start charging, I use two known test weights, a 250 grain and a 55 grain to check and to recheck for zero several times for repeated accuracy then I start charging. When finished charging the cases, I repeat the process and again before doing the next 50.

As an Aerospace Structural Tech and for someone to tell me that was due to material failure? NOT!

Looks like a double charge, real easy to do!!!

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I prefer slow burning powders that fill the case like IMR4227 and 2400. They measure out consistently and impossible to throw a double charge!

+6 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Wow! Natural Selection almost got one.

I don't reload so my observation may not be worth much but I know people. Prolly Mr. Superpressure has been overpressuring that revolver for a while, and his new load was another incremental step in "how much can I get away with?" reasoning. I say that because if the damage is excessive even for a dumbaxx loader, maybe the cylinder had already suffered some metal fatigue from previous ovepressure loads.

+7 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Many good posts. Breaking the rules always has consequences!

The best way to start reloading is with a mentor who is meticulous. From that experience, the novice learns how exacting the tolerances must be and the amount of care that is required.

I've never had problems reloading rifle cartridges. After a few squibs with handgun ammo, I've had to learn to visually inspect the powder in each case as it advances to the seating die. Now it's just another step in the routine.

Check & recheck keeps things safe.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sidewinder wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I used to weigh every 5th, then I ruined a Ruger P89 while shooting double taps at the range. The first was a squib load, followed quickly by a live round; naturally, they were both my own reloads. Fortunately for me, I was shooting low power rounds I had loaded or it could have damaged more than the gun. Now every round is weighed and any discrepancy gets its charge dumped into the scale and reweighed. Strangely, my groups have tightened up.

And Ruckweiler, as for supersizing "boobs, handloads, and hot rod engines" I really only have a problem with one of those. Can you guess which one it is?

+6 Good Comment? | | Report
from jbird wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Ruckweiler, the only thing on your list that I agree w/ is handloads. "big is better" does not translate well to them, as the pics obviously show. As for boobs and engines, "big is better" works just fine for me;)

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sidewinder wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Other things that help prevent potentially harmful accidents: If you're going to spend some serious time at the bench, say reloading some for pistol, and a few for the deer rifle, leave the bench between loads. Clean up after the pistol lot is done just like you were going out of the country for a month. Sanitize the area. Have a glass of tea, then go back to the bench. Assemble all components for the rifle load, double-check with manual, check again. Secure all items not required for that load in the cabinet and have NOTHING that is not required for that particular load anywhere near the bench.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

BY the way did you know burning rates like IMR4831 is pure hell hammering the gas operating system on a gas guns (Semi Auto Rifle)!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I pulled the trigger to quick!

There should be a reloading book strictly for semi auto and other none bolt action rifles.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from wgp wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Something not already mentioned, be very cautious about accepting reloads from anybody else. Some people are better at reloading than others, and rifles vary, too. I shoot my own reloads, nobody else's, I am very particular about the reloading process, and have never had a problem. A friend was experiencing bolt sticking in his .300 Win Mag, I found out he was using somebody else's reloads and I have always thought his friend was trying something too hot.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from KJ wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Famous last words:

"Hey! Watch this!"

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

KJ, I think it was "Hold my beer & watch this" ol' numbskull reloading probably loaded "hisself" up first.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

This is one of the worse blow-ups I have seen on a handgun;it looks like both bullets blew-up!
Damn lucky no one was seriously injured, or killed is an understatement.
I have seen blow-ups on muzzle loaders with double charges, or nitro based powder used in error, that blew out the barrel to look like a banana peel!
CHECK,CHECK, AND RE-CHECK your loads when handloading!!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

wgp

Got one better than that, picture this!

20 miles north, Eielson AFB Alaska and the next stop for civilization is Russia. A friend of ran out of 30-06 for his Remington Semi Auto and asked if I have any extra. Sure, I brought you extra rounds laying in the middle of the seat and "DO NOT USE THE ROUNDS ON THE DASH BOARD"! So guess what, he garbed the rounds off the dash board, 30-06 loaded with Hornady 190 Grain Soft Point Boat Tails loaded at 2825ish fps with IMR4831, a bolt gun only load. The other load was for my M1 Garand and they were in 8 round clips. Well you probably have guessed what happened by now when he pulled the trigger, it kicked him like a Mule and the casing with shooting out about 12 feet or so. He gave me a funny look of what the hell and I said, you grabbed the wrong ammo didn't you. He knew he was grabbing the wrong ammo but wanted to try it. I found the casing and the ejector almost ripped the base off due to excessive pressure in the system and I was surprised it didn't break something.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from sgaredneck wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Damn.........

I have seen this exact thing before. A friend who is normally what I consider to be a careful handloader got this same result from a bad load (we think somehow a mixed powder - don't ask) inserted into a Super Blackhawk. Luckily only a single bullet was loaded, unlike this case. To blow either the SB or the 629, you have to screw up royally, or only a little. In reloading any small screw-up can lead to the closing credits being played on your gun, your trigger hand, and/or your life. His Super Blackhawk cylinder and top strap pretty much are probably still in orbit now with all the other space junk up there. Some nights I come out of my shop after a reloading session and I look at the sky and think, "Damn he was lucky - I wonder if it's still up there?"

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Wheel gun, lever gun, pump gun, break open gun cannot withstand bolt action loads. However if your shooting the Ruger #3 in 45-70 and as the story goes, Sir Bill Ruger himself tried to blow up the action on one and the only damage he done was break the stock in 3 places and the casing melted in the chamber! I don't think I'll try that LOL!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Shooter/handloader not hurt. Guess that says something of the quality of firearms we shoot today. Lucky guy, JMO.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I have handled maybe a half dozen such destroyed revolvers and auto loaders through hunter safety and "novelties" at a gun shop and have yet to hear a story other than, "Luckily, no one lost their hand or eye..." etc.

Now that's really good news, but personally, I think the odds are against it.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from sgaredneck wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Clay,
I know someone with a #3 45-70 who loaded up some HOT loads.... I'm talking 458 Win. hot....THAT was brutal. My eyes are watering just thinking about it. And the #3 with that buttstock/buttplate.....

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from T.W. Davidson wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

My one bad accident in handloading occurred a few years ago. My then-11 year old daughter helped me load about 20 rounds of .257 Roberts ammo with 75-grain Hornady V-maxes and the standard published load of 48-grains of H-380. This is a superb varmint/coyote/blow-up-water-jugs load, producing well over 3500 fps even in a 22" barrel, with very little recoil. It is a load I have fired many hundreds of times in several .257 Roberts rifles.

It was wintertime, about 40 degrees outside. I fired several shots at a target some 500 yards away. All went well. On my next shot, however, there was a tremendous explosion. The rifle rose up in the air and flew back over my shoulder. I was temporarily knocked senseless. I was blinded. I felt a burning sensation in my palm through the leather glove on my (left) trigger hand.

After about 15 minutes I could see enough to know several things: my rifle was wreakage; there was a 1" black powder burn in the palm of my left hand; there was a little blood in my eyes from a cut on my forehead; and I had no idea what went wrong.

The gunsmith and I had to remove the barrel from the action, since the action itself was essentially welded/molded/merged into a big piece of scrap metal. We then drilled the bolt out of the action, which was a difficult task. My gunsmith has a friend who is a shooter, a gun nut and a metallurgist, all in one. We sent the remains of my rifle to him. A few weeks later he reported back to us his belief that I had fired a cartridge loaded with two loads of H-380 in it instead of one. This is entirely possible, since H-380 consists of incredibly tiny little balls, and 48-grains is almost nothing in terms of taking up case capacity in most centerfire rifle cartidges which use that powder.

The metallurgist's estimate of the chamber pressure? About 110,000 psi, or approximately twice that of the published load.

I've thought a lot about my reloading procedures on the day that my daughter and I produced those 20 rounds of .257 ammo. There was a brief moment where I left the table to go use the bathroom or answer the phone or some such thing. I distinctly remember that. In my absence, I believe my daughter accidentally put a second load of H-380 into a case that already had a load in it. I was negligent not to visually double-check each and every case before I put a bullet into it. What happened is my fault, not my daughter's. I've never said a negative word to her about it.

Long-term injuries? None. Lessons learned? At least three: (1) always visually double-check the powder level in every round of ammunition you load; 2) always personally load the powder (after weighing each and every powder load per case on a digital scale, and these days I use two separate scales) into every individual case of ammo you shoot; and (3) replacing a destroyed rifle is expensive and embarrassing.

I've not had a serious handloading issue since.

TWD

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from semp wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

It's great to share projects with our children. I once had my daughter Chrissy help me assemble a Bar-B-Q ... one of those with several hundred screws(or so it seems).
Chrissy was the keeper of the screws. When asked for a screw she just schrugged ... the screws had been sprinkled all over the lovely grassy lawn. Cost me a trip to the screw store ... nothing more. Is reloading a 'share' project? Methinks not.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I've seen a lot of hot loads and guns that have blown up. The more I think about this one? He had to double charge the case to get that kind of detonation and especially blowing the top strap clean off!

Lucky He is!!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from kudukid wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Dear T.W.
If you double load 48 grains of H380 into a 257 Roberts case you will get about 40 grains on the table and floor.

For everybody else, a garden variety Mauser 98 action in good condition will withstand 145,000 psi absolute without disintegrating. So when you actually blow one up you are into stratospheric pressures.

If you rupture the head of a brass case or blow a primer pocket in a bolt rifle you are into the 80,000 psi range and above depending on case head design. There are few if any SAAMI specs. calling for above 65,000 psi absolute in any brass cartridge.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Idahooutdoors, this does not necessary mean a Max load, but an extremly light load can cause such damage because of detination, instead of controled burn... My guess would have been wrong powder....

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

kudukid, you are some what correct, but remember, a rifle is a lot stronger than a revolver, as stated, the back strap is the weakest point on a revolver, due to the rear sight at rear of strap, and flame cut at front of strap. I still believe the damage was caused from an undercharge or wrong powder...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

A lot of people does not understand what a "flamecut" is or the seriousness of it, especially in Stainless steel revolvers...One observation was a buldge in the barrel, another indication of an extreamly light load. Does anyone agree?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from elmer f. wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

W-O-W! ! ! ! I hope this guy simply made a mistake, and did not consiously try to "over load" his ammo. if it was an intentional "magnum + P job, it will certainly cure his tendancies to try to hot rod guns! an accident, is just that, and those can happen to any of us. try as we may, at some time, we all make them. hopefully not to this extent. i did a similar mistake about a year ago, but i was much luckier. it was in a much stronger remington 700. i mis-read the manual, and used the wrong powder. it took me a while to figure out what had happened, but eventually i did. there was no damage to the gun, thankfully. that cured me of trying to overload my guns intentionally, now, if a load looks to hot, i just do not use it. a couple of weeks ago, i was loading some 223 ammo, and i was working up a load. when i got to the 3/4 way up the powder range, the case was full to the top, no room for the bullet. at full load, it was supposed to be a compressed load. but a compressed load @ 3/4 loading? not for me! i dumped it out (actually all of the loads) and found a different load that i knew worked. sometimes, it is better to stay with what you have, instead of searching for a "better" load.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from platte river rat wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Clay---In the new Hornady--7th Edition--loading manual, on page 451 and page 478 you will find loading info for 308 and 30-06 service rifles. this might help someone.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from blueridge wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

This is a great topic, and can be a lifesaver. T.W. raises the LIFE-SAVING point that all rounds should be visually inspected. ALL OF 'EM. Every time. I find a crookneck lamp on the bench helps tons...and it is not only the overloaded round one is looking for, it is the empty round, too. A bullet lodged in the barrel is a disaster waiting for the naive, to 'shoot it out'.

It seems a little silly to pay premium prices for good components only to rush this little safety inspection of a moment. It took courage for T.W. to confess an accident like the one he had...and I have to encourage Semp to reconsider having your daughter or new-comer help with the reloading experience. Reloading with such a pilgrim is a teaching experience. It teaches them caution, such as in packing one's own parachute. I reloaded with a Grandson last year, for his new/old Mauser...then we went out and shot the rounds, sighting it in. He had a blast, after which we came back home and reloaded him a supply for hunting. None of which I could have afforded at today's prices...if the rounds were even available from the store.

Good post, Dave, and I tip my hat to you.

Blue

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

platte river rat

NO JOKE!

THANKS FOR THE INFO!!!

I hope it has 223, just started loading for it. 308 and 06 I know what loads and already have pet loads that double both for Hunting and Competition just switch from a Match to a Soft Point or just go for it. Match bullets go off like a bomb like the Berger Bullets!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

sarg

Flame cut, didn't cross my mind! But what if?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from yohan wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

This is a VERY good subject with some VERY good posts
I enjoyd reading some ( most ) and also between the lines of a few.
To that end I REALLY do hope the powers that be, at F & S recognize that discussions such as this can be very educational / bennificial to the shooting and hunting sports in general.

Reagrdless of reason, to admit that it happens is the first step
Then taking a short leap of faith,. Subjcts of this type may well be great ammunition to help hold off the anti's.

Meaning if we as sportsmen and those who's business it to sell us magazines and equipment and ammunition and components help sportmen as a groeup to become what Wall street failed misserably at for eight years .
Which is self regulation and control along with overt
attempts to prevent unecessary accidents like this.
(Or Bernie Madoff)
The light that shines upon us as grouop would be a kinder softer light.

Realising full well of course that some guys ( won't mention size. but never seen it in women) simply
"can't not" equate man hood with the size of thier pick up and the vulume of the attending bang, in pursuit of sending a Q-Ball sized projectile down range at 3500 fps.yuk yuk regardles of firearm type.
But it is this bunch that needs our help the most.

Like Mr Petzal and many others who have done a lot of game killing know .
The more you kill the more you realize
There is a killing power thresh hold beyond which is simply more unnecessry bang,.and under no circumstances I am aware of dose that required power level ( IE: bang/ killing power) reach that required to blow up guns and people .

Yall have a nice day

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from T.W. Davidson wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

NB regarding my last post:

When the gunsmith and I removed the barrel and drilled the bolt out of what was left of the action, we could find nothing--not even fragments--of the case or the primer. There were, however, very minute brass fragments in the small cut on my forehead--I know this because in the months that followed the accident my forehead would itch like crazy and I would scratch at it and dig at it and end up with very tiny bits of brass in my tweezers.

I admit I have not attempted to purposely double-load a .257 Roberts case with H-380 in order to determine how much H-380 a Roberts case can hold. But what I do know is this: whether it was a double-load of H-380, or whether it was a combination of different powders, other than the barrel (which itself was pressure-damaged where it screwed into the action, but was repaired and reused in another action) and the stock, the rifle was completely destroyed. The action was wreckage; the firing pin was gone; the floor plate was severely warped; all the internal magazine parts were destroyed; and the bolt was mangled metal unrecognizable as once having been a Remington 700 bolt. We broke the bolt handle off in our initial attempts to get the bolt out of the action, which result in our drilling the bolt out of the action.

Whatever went wrong in my rifle that day, went wrong big.

TWD

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

TWD

No way your daughter got a double charge of 40+ grains of H380 in a .257 Roberts case. Maybe she got a half charge and that caused a detonation. I challenge anyone to get 53 or more grains of H380 into a .257 Roberts case.

I don't doubt your experience, but I don't think a double charge was the culprit. A way over charge wit ha magnum primer maybe. Although I'm not sure that you could charge a .257 Roberts case with enough H380 to cause that situation, but I am not willing to try either.

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from yohan wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Sarg
My father was a gun smith and a ballistition (sp)
That said "it don't make me one "
,. but some of it rubbed off and I do have engineering background .

Still I have never seen a pistol (any gun) done in by low charge flame cut ,.. HOWEVER if low charge would detonate rather than burn ,the effect as you say could be rather spectacular.
Think it would need to be just the right low charge tho,.and or maybe wrong powder ,..
Very insightfull Sarg !! and intersting

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

All the posts are excellent! The take away from this episode in the life of Gun Nut's is to follow the load manuals for the type of rifle/handgun you are loading for. Leave the experimentation to the experts with the test barrels and remote equipment to prevent personal injury and a potential Darwin Award.

You rocket scientists out there aren't really going to come up with something new or better. The powder and bullet companies employ plenty of handloader cranks and they have tried all the possible applications of their products. It is way more efficient to invest a few dollars in reloading manuals than new rifles and hospital bills. But I suppose reloading manuals don't make good war stories either.

Best regards,
WMH

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from kudukid wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

T.W.

Amazing that happened to a Remington 721/700!!!

That particular action has been destruction tested with some incredible concoctions by Remington's engineers. I don't know that they were ever able to actually destroy one of them. In one of their experiments they forced a 180 grain bullet into the throat and followed it with another 180 grain bullet in front of a full case of one of the faster powders for a 180 grain bullet. Even that didn't destroy the action!

"This is entirely possible, since H-380 consists of incredibly tiny little balls, and 48-grains is almost nothing in terms of taking up case capacity in most centerfire rifle cartidges which use that powder."

I'm wondering if this was actually H380 or some other ball powder intended for handguns as H380 is one of the coarser ball powders...not really "incredibly fine".

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from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Clay, I know a fellow who tried a very light load for the .222 I think he learned something the hard way.. Even a compressed load is not as dangerous as a very light load Yes, flame cutting could have been why the backstrap was completely missing, I alway watch flamecutting when tradeing revolvers,especially Stainless. another way to tell if someone has been shooting extreme loads in a SS revolver.

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from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

yohan, alow charge will not flame cut a backstrap, only hot loads, but with the Rear sight milled in and flame cutting in the front the backstrap was probly getting very weak, but yes, a can detinate with disasterous results...low charge, if the powder get away from the primer,

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from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

TWD, I totally agree with you, It would be impossible to double charge a .257 with H380.. I don't trust a powder dropper, I weigh each charge. I'm not interested in mass production, just a quality loaded case. many people never check the first charge dropped when changing powders...

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from platte river rat wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Clay, same Hornady manual---look on page 157 for 223 Rem service rifle data----enjoy

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

sarg

What I do know about metallurgy,I don't believe that was a light/squib load. I'm 98% convinced it was a double charge of fast rate powder. That's exactly why I never used Bullseye! I like slow burning even if it's compressed, higher velocities and lower pressures. I weigh each and every round as if it was for a shooting match. For hand gun, I still weigh each and every round for until the powder measure smooths out and even then I still weight every 5th round or so and always followed by a critical visual inspection for consistency of powder level.

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from nc30-06 wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

When I started re0loading, I bought several manuals and read them like novels. Lee has a good one and so does Speer. I read more than these though.
What surprises me is that almost no two loading manuals agree on powder measures for the exact same bullet/powder combination. There seems to always be a variation.
My first re-load was for 9mm. My first round was fired with a little trepidation, even though I had followed recommendations and triple checked everything. Relief came when all was well. The learning had started.
Too bad that guy ruined a quality revolver from a disregard for the safe recommendations or an honest mistake or just carelessness.

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from coho310 wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Somebody could have died,glad no one did though! Next time I shoot a revolver, I'll be careful reloading!

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Lee's 'Modern Reloading' is an excellent source on the "why's and wherefore's" of reloading. I recommend reading that manual and then others of your choosing to get a good grasp of the foundations of safe reloading.

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from Walt Smith wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Maybe a disgruntled wife slipped in a little extra powder along with a few more zeros on the old mans insurance policy!

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from buckstopper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I agree with Clay, Bullseye in a large diameter case can be bad news. It is very easy volume-wise to double charge. Bullseye is like Bryllcream, a little dab will do ya! If you shoot wad cutters that are seated very deep it, you could avoid problems with light loads. I started reloading over 35 years ago. Keep it simple. I like Unique. It will work in shotguns or pistol and do a good job in each. Universal is a simular all-around powder. I learned the hard way also to NEVER reload with friends or family members. Too many distractions, you need to be focused on each step and double check yourself to avoid double charges or empty charges. A couple of years ago I had a .22 S&W pistol blow up at the range. Pieces of the bolt flew out each side. That's why even bystanders should wear eye protection. Anyway, the case was still in the chamber, split at the base. After gathering the pieces, making photos, I called and wrote to the ammo manufacturer. I sent the bolt, cartridge case and remaining ammo to them. They replaced the bolt to the pistol and replaced ammo, but said it wasn't their fault. I will only use CCI rimfire from now on. I have found duds in bricks from two major manufacturers, I'll never by bulk rimfires again.

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from jamesti wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

follow the recipe first. if you want to make any changes, ask someone!

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from kendixkd wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Makes me want to disassemble all my loads [ over 2000 ] and recheck them. Some 20 years old.
Ken

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from GregoryS wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

what an idiot. let me put it this way... if you don't find this load in the books. be smart and don't try anything new. its a wonder thats is dumb nut aint dead

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from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Clay, I like Bullseye in .380 and 9mm. That's the only rounds I.ve loaded for some time. Speaking of metallurgy, you do know that Case hardening is only so many thousands thick, and after flame cutind so much, the metal is not as strong. The backstrap is not really very thick to begin with

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from Zermoid wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Hey Sarg, I was thinking along the same lines too, a undercharge can be just as bad as an overcharge.

Dave, perhaps you will know, several years ago I remember an article about revolver blowup, dunno what Mag or by whom it was written but it was a story that tested the overcharge theory by double loading, by simply scooping the case full of fast powder and shoving in a bullet, almost everything you could think of to produce an overcharge blowup.
Test fired in a vise of course, the worst that happened as far as I remember was swollen cylinders, barrels. No catastrophic blowups.

It was theorized that a round with much less than full case capacity of powder may sometimes "detonate" en mass instead of the normal burn from one end of the powder column to the other, this detonation produces a instant pressure spike that is so sudden that the bullet's inertia cannot be overcome quickly enough to let the pressure lower. Result is the catastrophic blowup.

As far as I know this has never been proven in a lab but does sound logical, especially when intentional overloading cannot account for many of the blowups that have been seen over the years.

I personally load to the top end of the manual's loads but do not exceed it, if it says max load I believe it, altho I too wonder why different manuals can have different MAX Loads for the same powder/bullet/primer combo.
BTW, do not change primers in a recipe, I also read a article about primers, different brands, types of primers can vary the pressure by 1,000's of PSI in a load, if you change the primer used start low and work up looking for pressure signs. Might be the difference between counting to 5 or 10 on your fingers.

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from Ferber wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I believe, and have always believed, powerful loads beyond official handgun recipes, belong in rifles. Why the guy would make such a handload is beyond me. As for hunting with 'traditional' handguns...they're so easy to carry compared to lugging a rifle hither and yon, and are deadly at ranges not usually exceeding 50 yards or so. But if you're lugging a long, single shot
(for example), scoped, 'long-range' handgun in a bigger-than-usual caliber, that's large and bulky, it is STILL a handgun. That's why we have proper rifles.

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from Ruckweiler wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Sidewinder and jbird:
I've always referred to those women with "enhancements" as having aftermarket parts.

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from bvk52 wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Another good reminder to wear safety glasses when at the shooting range.
Even if you are not the one who has made the loading mistake, the guy next to you might have been that person.

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from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

buk52, yes glasses should be worn at the range as well as hearing protection... With most loadings it is hard or impossible to double harge a case, Over charge yes... Many people never check the first charge after changing powders with a Dropper and any kind of powder can get in a case. as someone might do when going from Pistol to rifle cases. I still believe a low charge is more dangerous than an overcharge in most cases. Notice how thin the walls of a revolver cylinder are.......

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from Ruckweiler wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Sadly, the old maxims have to be re-learned again and again. For example, don't fire a weapon with a Damascus barrel( I still read that advice now and again) or when hunting, be sure you can identify your target. Unfortunately, there are those among us who either haven't gotten the word or choose to ignore it.

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from Robert Ewing wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

As of yet,I have not loaded my first round [shothell].A month with equipment and I'm still reading .Nice visual not to improvise or take a short cut.

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from sarg wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Zermoid, good post....

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from glucomt wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

Sometimes, the problem with Americans is in the old adage "some is good, more is better." We try to make everything bigger. Boobs, handloads, and hot rod engines are among that list. http://www.checkshinglessymptoms.com

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from spsdel99 wrote 3 years 11 weeks ago

I learned the hard way also to NEVER reload with friends or family members. Too many distractions, you need to be focused on each step and double check yourself to avoid double charges or empty charges. A couple of years ago I had a .22 S&W pistol blow up at the range. Pieces of the bolt flew out each side. That's why even bystanders should wear eye protection. Anyway, the case was still in the chamber, split at the base. After gathering the pieces, making photos, I called and wrote to the ammo manufacturer. I sent the bolt, cartridge case and remaining ammo to them.
government jobs

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from spsdel99 wrote 3 years 11 weeks ago

you need to be focused on each step and double check yourself to avoid double charges or empty charges. A couple of years ago I had a .22 S&W pistol blow up at the range. Pieces of the bolt flew out each side. That's why even bystanders should wear eye protection. Anyway, the case was still in the chamber, split at the base. After gathering the pieces, making photos, I called and wrote to the ammo manufacturer. I sent the bolt, cartridge case and remaining ammo to them. http://www.egovernmentjobs.in

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from zara454 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

It was wintertime, about 40 degrees outside. I fired several shots at a target some 500 yards away. All went well. On my next shot, however, there was a tremendous explosion. The rifle rose up in the air and flew back over my shoulder. lupus symptoms I was temporarily knocked senseless. I was blinded. I felt a burning sensation in my palm through the leather glove on my (left) trigger hand.

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from zara454 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

It was wintertime, about 40 degrees outside. I fired several shots at a target some 500 yards away. All went well. On my next shot, however, there was a tremendous explosion. The rifle rose up in the air and flew back over my shoulder. http://www.checklupussymptoms.com I was temporarily knocked senseless. I was blinded. I felt a burning sensation in my palm through the leather glove on my (left) trigger hand.

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from glucomt wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Sadly, the old maxims have to be re-learned again and again. For example, don't fire a weapon with a Damascus barrel( I still read that advice now and again) or when hunting, be sure you can identify your target. http://www.checkmonosymptoms.com

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from glucomt wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

A waste of a nice gun....that is another reason I'm not a big fan of max loads...some people re-load to push the envelope, others like me, do it to save money and tweek accuracy...I'm usually a fan of moderate loads, http://www.automobileupdates.com guns, powder, and brass end up lasting longer, and for the most part they are just as deadly and usually more accurate...

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from glucomt wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Too many distractions, you need to be focused on each step and double check yourself to avoid double charges or empty charges. A couple of years ago I had a .22 S&W pistol blow up at the range. Pieces of the bolt flew out each side. That's why even bystanders should wear eye protection. Anyway, the case was still in the chamber, split at the base. After gathering the pieces, making photos, I called and wrote to the ammo manufacturer. I sent the bolt, cartridge case and remaining ammo to them.
http://www.jobsnresults.com/keane-placement-papers-question-papers/

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from semp wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I've never used Win powder. But the start load for Win231 for a 44 RemMag using 165gr cast bullets is 6.0 grains. While the start load of Win296 for the same round is 29 grains . Now I don't know, becaus I've not used these powders, BUT ... if it's physically possible to swap these powders THEN that's a HUGE error . If that swap took place then this fella is being watched over by some deity and was lucky to just lose a gun.

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from borrath wrote 2 years 51 weeks ago

I search a long time for this article. Thnaks a lot for this information.

iddaa tahminleri

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from frae wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

That is pretty hilarious. I mean, the "tweety birds" part, I think that's kinda humorous. But kidding aside, I'm glad nothing serious happens to this man.

Physics Games

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from rockey wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

This is a great inspiring article.I am pretty much pleased with your good work.You put really very helpful information. Keep it up. Keep blogging. Looking to reading your next post.
http://www.austintxrealestate.biz/

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from jotsautumn wrote 2 years 20 weeks ago

Clean up after the pistol lot is done just like you were going out of the country for a month. Sanitize the area. Have a glass of tea, then go back to the bench. Assemble all components for the rifle load, double-check with manual, check again. Secure all items not required for that load in the cabinet and have NOTHING that is not required for that particular load anywhere near the bench. http://www.generalupdates.com

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from harryautumn wrote 2 years 20 weeks ago

One day he was tired ,.but decided to include a box of his special( dip stick brand) home rolled wad cutters in a deal he made to sell a chrome s & w 44 mag
Dont recall the model. But it was a prety pistol as I remeber it .Ivory grips ,. the whole she-bang as it were

A few days later the guy who bought the pistol from ole dip stick, showed up with the pistol.
Which was opened up like a can of beans left on fire with out poking holoes in it, a small bandage on his head .and a few stitches in his hand
http://www.automobilehouse.com

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from gayatrimanvi wrote 2 years 20 weeks ago

Of course "ole dip stick" the pistoleer was incenced at first,.. as it seemd impossible to him. That as infalable as he had become in his lengthy (6 month) career as a pistoleer and reloader. anything remotly ( incorrect ) with anything he did in that arena could not possibly happen. http://www.automobileupdates.com

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from mohanautumn wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

I used to weigh every 5th, then I ruined a Ruger P89 while shooting double taps at the range. The first was a squib load, followed quickly by a live round; naturally, they were both my own reloads. Fortunately for me, I was shooting low power rounds I had loaded or it could have damaged more than the gun. Now every round is weighed and any discrepancy gets its charge dumped into the scale and reweighed. Strangely, my groups have tightened up. http://www.thyroidsymptomsfacts.com

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from nidhivohra33 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Clean up after the pistol lot is done just like you were going out of the country for a month. Sanitize the area. Have a glass of tea, then go back to the bench. Assemble all components for the rifle load, double-check with manual, check again. Secure all items not required for that load in the cabinet and have NOTHING that is not required for that particular load anywhere near the bench. http://www.bedbugbitescure.com

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from lohman wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

he was very lucky

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from mojsan wrote 2 years 5 days ago

I have an 1187 12 gauge and it's a great gun but it is a bit heavy. I also have a full size 870 20 gauge but I think the combination of the weight and recoil adds up for her. She can hit early on with it, but tires quickly. I think I'm going with the super x3, 20 gauge. Maybe a youth model, but I am going to keep my eyes out for that Benelli m1-90.

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from Ruckweiler wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Sometimes, the problem with Americans is in the old adage "some is good, more is better." We try to make everything bigger. Boobs, handloads, and hot rod engines are among that list.

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from idahooutdoors wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

A waste of a nice gun....that is another reason I'm not a big fan of max loads...some people re-load to push the envelope, others like me, do it to save money and tweek accuracy...I'm usually a fan of moderate loads, guns, powder, and brass end up lasting longer, and for the most part they are just as deadly and usually more accurate...

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from buckhunter wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

That is some serious damage. No doubt this guy was lucky as well as the people standing near.

I think my limited knowledge of reloading keeps me safe from trying dangerous stuff like that. I read the book and move slowly. Somewhere along the line this guy thought he was above the rules.

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from yohan wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Friend of mine ( 12-14) years ago who was ( and is ) just about as handy ( mechanical) as cub bear with flintlock on windy day,.decided he would handload
So,. like evrything in his life, he jumped in with both feet while still 1/2 cocked.

He mostly faniced himself as a pistoleer,.. and fired many many rounds,.many of which he reloaded.

One day he was tired ,.but decided to include a box of his special( dip stick brand) home rolled wad cutters in a deal he made to sell a chrome s & w 44 mag
Dont recall the model. But it was a prety pistol as I remeber it .Ivory grips ,. the whole she-bang as it were

A few days later the guy who bought the pistol from ole dip stick, showed up with the pistol.
Which was opened up like a can of beans left on fire with out poking holoes in it, a small bandage on his head .and a few stitches in his hand

The pistol buyer's ssuggestion was that if in fact ole dip stick the pistoleer and reloader par exa-lanse
Would consider refunding his money he would consider not sueing him for everthing he had or ever would have.
Part of this reasoniong was that that he ( pistol buyer) was partly at fault for trusting the source of the relaods to begin with.

Of course "ole dip stick" the pistoleer was incenced at first,.. as it seemd impossible to him. That as infalable as he had become in his lengthy (6 month) career as a pistoleer and reloader. anything remotly ( incorrect ) with anything he did in that arena could not possibly happen.

He ( ole dip stick) forth with called me as council (not legal council but advisor) after hearing the story ,.I suggested he peel off the cabbage and then some forth with,. and that if he didnt.
Do not ecpect me to come visit him the the jail where they keep terminal idiots and 1/2 cocked reloaders and pistoleers.

Ole dip stick had in his infalable but reduced state of conciousness " tired " maybe understatement,.
as he is not adverse to a cocktail or 4 before dinning,..

Had double charged the rounds with the wrong powder.

Bang is F ing right !!!

He slipped the noose on that one.
After which I suggested possibly he might consider curtailing his relaoding activity and distribution of same to unsuspsting membes of society ,.. and furhter
to concoct only that which he himslef intended discharge .
Not known nationally for his genius ,. he did however decern the intrinsic logic and has as far as I know ,. not blown up anything or anyone else since.

I handload ( have for 30 year) but I am repectfully fearfull.
Hows bout u guys ?

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from Mike Diehl wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Wow! Natural Selection almost got one.

I don't reload so my observation may not be worth much but I know people. Prolly Mr. Superpressure has been overpressuring that revolver for a while, and his new load was another incremental step in "how much can I get away with?" reasoning. I say that because if the damage is excessive even for a dumbaxx loader, maybe the cylinder had already suffered some metal fatigue from previous ovepressure loads.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I prefer slow burning powders that fill the case like IMR4227 and 2400. They measure out consistently and impossible to throw a double charge!

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from Sidewinder wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I used to weigh every 5th, then I ruined a Ruger P89 while shooting double taps at the range. The first was a squib load, followed quickly by a live round; naturally, they were both my own reloads. Fortunately for me, I was shooting low power rounds I had loaded or it could have damaged more than the gun. Now every round is weighed and any discrepancy gets its charge dumped into the scale and reweighed. Strangely, my groups have tightened up.

And Ruckweiler, as for supersizing "boobs, handloads, and hot rod engines" I really only have a problem with one of those. Can you guess which one it is?

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from jjas wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I see this stuff all the time. Guys pushing the envelope thinking they are smarter that the people who do this stuff for a living.

This guy is lucky to be alive. I'm just surprised he's not trying to sue S&W, the case manufacturer, the gun powder company, the primer maker, his mother, etc....

What a dumba$$.

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from Sidewinder wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Other things that help prevent potentially harmful accidents: If you're going to spend some serious time at the bench, say reloading some for pistol, and a few for the deer rifle, leave the bench between loads. Clean up after the pistol lot is done just like you were going out of the country for a month. Sanitize the area. Have a glass of tea, then go back to the bench. Assemble all components for the rifle load, double-check with manual, check again. Secure all items not required for that load in the cabinet and have NOTHING that is not required for that particular load anywhere near the bench.

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from wgp wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Something not already mentioned, be very cautious about accepting reloads from anybody else. Some people are better at reloading than others, and rifles vary, too. I shoot my own reloads, nobody else's, I am very particular about the reloading process, and have never had a problem. A friend was experiencing bolt sticking in his .300 Win Mag, I found out he was using somebody else's reloads and I have always thought his friend was trying something too hot.

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from T.W. Davidson wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

My one bad accident in handloading occurred a few years ago. My then-11 year old daughter helped me load about 20 rounds of .257 Roberts ammo with 75-grain Hornady V-maxes and the standard published load of 48-grains of H-380. This is a superb varmint/coyote/blow-up-water-jugs load, producing well over 3500 fps even in a 22" barrel, with very little recoil. It is a load I have fired many hundreds of times in several .257 Roberts rifles.

It was wintertime, about 40 degrees outside. I fired several shots at a target some 500 yards away. All went well. On my next shot, however, there was a tremendous explosion. The rifle rose up in the air and flew back over my shoulder. I was temporarily knocked senseless. I was blinded. I felt a burning sensation in my palm through the leather glove on my (left) trigger hand.

After about 15 minutes I could see enough to know several things: my rifle was wreakage; there was a 1" black powder burn in the palm of my left hand; there was a little blood in my eyes from a cut on my forehead; and I had no idea what went wrong.

The gunsmith and I had to remove the barrel from the action, since the action itself was essentially welded/molded/merged into a big piece of scrap metal. We then drilled the bolt out of the action, which was a difficult task. My gunsmith has a friend who is a shooter, a gun nut and a metallurgist, all in one. We sent the remains of my rifle to him. A few weeks later he reported back to us his belief that I had fired a cartridge loaded with two loads of H-380 in it instead of one. This is entirely possible, since H-380 consists of incredibly tiny little balls, and 48-grains is almost nothing in terms of taking up case capacity in most centerfire rifle cartidges which use that powder.

The metallurgist's estimate of the chamber pressure? About 110,000 psi, or approximately twice that of the published load.

I've thought a lot about my reloading procedures on the day that my daughter and I produced those 20 rounds of .257 ammo. There was a brief moment where I left the table to go use the bathroom or answer the phone or some such thing. I distinctly remember that. In my absence, I believe my daughter accidentally put a second load of H-380 into a case that already had a load in it. I was negligent not to visually double-check each and every case before I put a bullet into it. What happened is my fault, not my daughter's. I've never said a negative word to her about it.

Long-term injuries? None. Lessons learned? At least three: (1) always visually double-check the powder level in every round of ammunition you load; 2) always personally load the powder (after weighing each and every powder load per case on a digital scale, and these days I use two separate scales) into every individual case of ammo you shoot; and (3) replacing a destroyed rifle is expensive and embarrassing.

I've not had a serious handloading issue since.

TWD

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from kudukid wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Dear T.W.
If you double load 48 grains of H380 into a 257 Roberts case you will get about 40 grains on the table and floor.

For everybody else, a garden variety Mauser 98 action in good condition will withstand 145,000 psi absolute without disintegrating. So when you actually blow one up you are into stratospheric pressures.

If you rupture the head of a brass case or blow a primer pocket in a bolt rifle you are into the 80,000 psi range and above depending on case head design. There are few if any SAAMI specs. calling for above 65,000 psi absolute in any brass cartridge.

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from Big O wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

THIS is why the "books" say DO NOT exceed recomendations !

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from seadog wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Wow. That's the worst blowout I've ever seen. This is a good safety lesson for people like me that are thinking of taking up reloading and for those of you that already reload and are thinking about pushing the limits.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Bet he is looking for his "sign"! I'm glad he wasn't killed.

I don't reload handgun ammo, but I always keep rifle loads below the maximum by at least 0.3 grain regardless of pressure indications and velocity. Seldom will you get into real trouble following instructions.

However, I recently had some loads exhibit signs of overpressure following the manual AND below max loads listed and using the primer listed. After reducing several times and still seeing overpressure signs, I found the Federal GM215M primer to be the culprit. No such problem with WLRM and CCI 250 primers in this load.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Pushing the Maximum is nothing new and how they are doing it isn’t new either. Like what was said, either a squib round, wrong powder or just overloaded. But like I said, how they are doing it isn’t new either! I have come across other reloaders who just scare the hell out of me, toss the scale up on the table zero it out set the powder measure and weigh every 5th or so case or just go for broke and I’ve seen some walk up to the shooting table with resizing lubricant just dripping off the cartridge and bullet and you can bet they didn’t get to shoot until they wiped the case off to my satisfaction. As some of you know, I do red line some of my loads yet they are still safe. What differs between my loads versus others, I weigh each and every round and when I finish charging all 50 cases I inspect and reinspect the level of powder for consistency and recheck the scale for accuracy. Before I start charging, I use two known test weights, a 250 grain and a 55 grain to check and to recheck for zero several times for repeated accuracy then I start charging. When finished charging the cases, I repeat the process and again before doing the next 50.

As an Aerospace Structural Tech and for someone to tell me that was due to material failure? NOT!

Looks like a double charge, real easy to do!!!

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from Carney wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Many good posts. Breaking the rules always has consequences!

The best way to start reloading is with a mentor who is meticulous. From that experience, the novice learns how exacting the tolerances must be and the amount of care that is required.

I've never had problems reloading rifle cartridges. After a few squibs with handgun ammo, I've had to learn to visually inspect the powder in each case as it advances to the seating die. Now it's just another step in the routine.

Check & recheck keeps things safe.

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from jbird wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Ruckweiler, the only thing on your list that I agree w/ is handloads. "big is better" does not translate well to them, as the pics obviously show. As for boobs and engines, "big is better" works just fine for me;)

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from KJ wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Famous last words:

"Hey! Watch this!"

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

KJ, I think it was "Hold my beer & watch this" ol' numbskull reloading probably loaded "hisself" up first.

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from Jim in Mo wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Shooter/handloader not hurt. Guess that says something of the quality of firearms we shoot today. Lucky guy, JMO.

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from Carney wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I have handled maybe a half dozen such destroyed revolvers and auto loaders through hunter safety and "novelties" at a gun shop and have yet to hear a story other than, "Luckily, no one lost their hand or eye..." etc.

Now that's really good news, but personally, I think the odds are against it.

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from ckRich wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

DOH!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

BY the way did you know burning rates like IMR4831 is pure hell hammering the gas operating system on a gas guns (Semi Auto Rifle)!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I pulled the trigger to quick!

There should be a reloading book strictly for semi auto and other none bolt action rifles.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

wgp

Got one better than that, picture this!

20 miles north, Eielson AFB Alaska and the next stop for civilization is Russia. A friend of ran out of 30-06 for his Remington Semi Auto and asked if I have any extra. Sure, I brought you extra rounds laying in the middle of the seat and "DO NOT USE THE ROUNDS ON THE DASH BOARD"! So guess what, he garbed the rounds off the dash board, 30-06 loaded with Hornady 190 Grain Soft Point Boat Tails loaded at 2825ish fps with IMR4831, a bolt gun only load. The other load was for my M1 Garand and they were in 8 round clips. Well you probably have guessed what happened by now when he pulled the trigger, it kicked him like a Mule and the casing with shooting out about 12 feet or so. He gave me a funny look of what the hell and I said, you grabbed the wrong ammo didn't you. He knew he was grabbing the wrong ammo but wanted to try it. I found the casing and the ejector almost ripped the base off due to excessive pressure in the system and I was surprised it didn't break something.

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from sgaredneck wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Damn.........

I have seen this exact thing before. A friend who is normally what I consider to be a careful handloader got this same result from a bad load (we think somehow a mixed powder - don't ask) inserted into a Super Blackhawk. Luckily only a single bullet was loaded, unlike this case. To blow either the SB or the 629, you have to screw up royally, or only a little. In reloading any small screw-up can lead to the closing credits being played on your gun, your trigger hand, and/or your life. His Super Blackhawk cylinder and top strap pretty much are probably still in orbit now with all the other space junk up there. Some nights I come out of my shop after a reloading session and I look at the sky and think, "Damn he was lucky - I wonder if it's still up there?"

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Wheel gun, lever gun, pump gun, break open gun cannot withstand bolt action loads. However if your shooting the Ruger #3 in 45-70 and as the story goes, Sir Bill Ruger himself tried to blow up the action on one and the only damage he done was break the stock in 3 places and the casing melted in the chamber! I don't think I'll try that LOL!

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from platte river rat wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Clay---In the new Hornady--7th Edition--loading manual, on page 451 and page 478 you will find loading info for 308 and 30-06 service rifles. this might help someone.

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from blueridge wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

This is a great topic, and can be a lifesaver. T.W. raises the LIFE-SAVING point that all rounds should be visually inspected. ALL OF 'EM. Every time. I find a crookneck lamp on the bench helps tons...and it is not only the overloaded round one is looking for, it is the empty round, too. A bullet lodged in the barrel is a disaster waiting for the naive, to 'shoot it out'.

It seems a little silly to pay premium prices for good components only to rush this little safety inspection of a moment. It took courage for T.W. to confess an accident like the one he had...and I have to encourage Semp to reconsider having your daughter or new-comer help with the reloading experience. Reloading with such a pilgrim is a teaching experience. It teaches them caution, such as in packing one's own parachute. I reloaded with a Grandson last year, for his new/old Mauser...then we went out and shot the rounds, sighting it in. He had a blast, after which we came back home and reloaded him a supply for hunting. None of which I could have afforded at today's prices...if the rounds were even available from the store.

Good post, Dave, and I tip my hat to you.

Blue

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from T.W. Davidson wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

NB regarding my last post:

When the gunsmith and I removed the barrel and drilled the bolt out of what was left of the action, we could find nothing--not even fragments--of the case or the primer. There were, however, very minute brass fragments in the small cut on my forehead--I know this because in the months that followed the accident my forehead would itch like crazy and I would scratch at it and dig at it and end up with very tiny bits of brass in my tweezers.

I admit I have not attempted to purposely double-load a .257 Roberts case with H-380 in order to determine how much H-380 a Roberts case can hold. But what I do know is this: whether it was a double-load of H-380, or whether it was a combination of different powders, other than the barrel (which itself was pressure-damaged where it screwed into the action, but was repaired and reused in another action) and the stock, the rifle was completely destroyed. The action was wreckage; the firing pin was gone; the floor plate was severely warped; all the internal magazine parts were destroyed; and the bolt was mangled metal unrecognizable as once having been a Remington 700 bolt. We broke the bolt handle off in our initial attempts to get the bolt out of the action, which result in our drilling the bolt out of the action.

Whatever went wrong in my rifle that day, went wrong big.

TWD

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

TWD

No way your daughter got a double charge of 40+ grains of H380 in a .257 Roberts case. Maybe she got a half charge and that caused a detonation. I challenge anyone to get 53 or more grains of H380 into a .257 Roberts case.

I don't doubt your experience, but I don't think a double charge was the culprit. A way over charge wit ha magnum primer maybe. Although I'm not sure that you could charge a .257 Roberts case with enough H380 to cause that situation, but I am not willing to try either.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

All the posts are excellent! The take away from this episode in the life of Gun Nut's is to follow the load manuals for the type of rifle/handgun you are loading for. Leave the experimentation to the experts with the test barrels and remote equipment to prevent personal injury and a potential Darwin Award.

You rocket scientists out there aren't really going to come up with something new or better. The powder and bullet companies employ plenty of handloader cranks and they have tried all the possible applications of their products. It is way more efficient to invest a few dollars in reloading manuals than new rifles and hospital bills. But I suppose reloading manuals don't make good war stories either.

Best regards,
WMH

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from jamesti wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

follow the recipe first. if you want to make any changes, ask someone!

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from GregoryS wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

what an idiot. let me put it this way... if you don't find this load in the books. be smart and don't try anything new. its a wonder thats is dumb nut aint dead

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from jeffo52284 wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

wow im glad no one was seriously injured. this is why reloading makes me nervous

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from thuroy wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Wow!

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from bluecollarkid wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Nevermind.

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from idduckhntr wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I know a guy who purpossly tried to blow up a Super black in 45 Colt to duplicate 454 vel firsst he used 2400 then used 4227. I dont know what ever happend to see once in awhile and he still had both hands and all his fingers. When I told him how crazy he was he just laughed and said he knew what he was doing. Funny thing is this guy routingly freezes rifle bolts up from over loading.

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

&%$#, recommended !! Fat fingers again.

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

This is one of the worse blow-ups I have seen on a handgun;it looks like both bullets blew-up!
Damn lucky no one was seriously injured, or killed is an understatement.
I have seen blow-ups on muzzle loaders with double charges, or nitro based powder used in error, that blew out the barrel to look like a banana peel!
CHECK,CHECK, AND RE-CHECK your loads when handloading!!

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from sgaredneck wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Clay,
I know someone with a #3 45-70 who loaded up some HOT loads.... I'm talking 458 Win. hot....THAT was brutal. My eyes are watering just thinking about it. And the #3 with that buttstock/buttplate.....

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from semp wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

It's great to share projects with our children. I once had my daughter Chrissy help me assemble a Bar-B-Q ... one of those with several hundred screws(or so it seems).
Chrissy was the keeper of the screws. When asked for a screw she just schrugged ... the screws had been sprinkled all over the lovely grassy lawn. Cost me a trip to the screw store ... nothing more. Is reloading a 'share' project? Methinks not.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I've seen a lot of hot loads and guns that have blown up. The more I think about this one? He had to double charge the case to get that kind of detonation and especially blowing the top strap clean off!

Lucky He is!!

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from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Idahooutdoors, this does not necessary mean a Max load, but an extremly light load can cause such damage because of detination, instead of controled burn... My guess would have been wrong powder....

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from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

kudukid, you are some what correct, but remember, a rifle is a lot stronger than a revolver, as stated, the back strap is the weakest point on a revolver, due to the rear sight at rear of strap, and flame cut at front of strap. I still believe the damage was caused from an undercharge or wrong powder...

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from elmer f. wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

W-O-W! ! ! ! I hope this guy simply made a mistake, and did not consiously try to "over load" his ammo. if it was an intentional "magnum + P job, it will certainly cure his tendancies to try to hot rod guns! an accident, is just that, and those can happen to any of us. try as we may, at some time, we all make them. hopefully not to this extent. i did a similar mistake about a year ago, but i was much luckier. it was in a much stronger remington 700. i mis-read the manual, and used the wrong powder. it took me a while to figure out what had happened, but eventually i did. there was no damage to the gun, thankfully. that cured me of trying to overload my guns intentionally, now, if a load looks to hot, i just do not use it. a couple of weeks ago, i was loading some 223 ammo, and i was working up a load. when i got to the 3/4 way up the powder range, the case was full to the top, no room for the bullet. at full load, it was supposed to be a compressed load. but a compressed load @ 3/4 loading? not for me! i dumped it out (actually all of the loads) and found a different load that i knew worked. sometimes, it is better to stay with what you have, instead of searching for a "better" load.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

platte river rat

NO JOKE!

THANKS FOR THE INFO!!!

I hope it has 223, just started loading for it. 308 and 06 I know what loads and already have pet loads that double both for Hunting and Competition just switch from a Match to a Soft Point or just go for it. Match bullets go off like a bomb like the Berger Bullets!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

sarg

Flame cut, didn't cross my mind! But what if?

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from kudukid wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

T.W.

Amazing that happened to a Remington 721/700!!!

That particular action has been destruction tested with some incredible concoctions by Remington's engineers. I don't know that they were ever able to actually destroy one of them. In one of their experiments they forced a 180 grain bullet into the throat and followed it with another 180 grain bullet in front of a full case of one of the faster powders for a 180 grain bullet. Even that didn't destroy the action!

"This is entirely possible, since H-380 consists of incredibly tiny little balls, and 48-grains is almost nothing in terms of taking up case capacity in most centerfire rifle cartidges which use that powder."

I'm wondering if this was actually H380 or some other ball powder intended for handguns as H380 is one of the coarser ball powders...not really "incredibly fine".

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from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

TWD, I totally agree with you, It would be impossible to double charge a .257 with H380.. I don't trust a powder dropper, I weigh each charge. I'm not interested in mass production, just a quality loaded case. many people never check the first charge dropped when changing powders...

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from platte river rat wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Clay, same Hornady manual---look on page 157 for 223 Rem service rifle data----enjoy

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Lee's 'Modern Reloading' is an excellent source on the "why's and wherefore's" of reloading. I recommend reading that manual and then others of your choosing to get a good grasp of the foundations of safe reloading.

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from Walt Smith wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Maybe a disgruntled wife slipped in a little extra powder along with a few more zeros on the old mans insurance policy!

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from buckstopper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I agree with Clay, Bullseye in a large diameter case can be bad news. It is very easy volume-wise to double charge. Bullseye is like Bryllcream, a little dab will do ya! If you shoot wad cutters that are seated very deep it, you could avoid problems with light loads. I started reloading over 35 years ago. Keep it simple. I like Unique. It will work in shotguns or pistol and do a good job in each. Universal is a simular all-around powder. I learned the hard way also to NEVER reload with friends or family members. Too many distractions, you need to be focused on each step and double check yourself to avoid double charges or empty charges. A couple of years ago I had a .22 S&W pistol blow up at the range. Pieces of the bolt flew out each side. That's why even bystanders should wear eye protection. Anyway, the case was still in the chamber, split at the base. After gathering the pieces, making photos, I called and wrote to the ammo manufacturer. I sent the bolt, cartridge case and remaining ammo to them. They replaced the bolt to the pistol and replaced ammo, but said it wasn't their fault. I will only use CCI rimfire from now on. I have found duds in bricks from two major manufacturers, I'll never by bulk rimfires again.

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from kendixkd wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Makes me want to disassemble all my loads [ over 2000 ] and recheck them. Some 20 years old.
Ken

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from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Clay, I like Bullseye in .380 and 9mm. That's the only rounds I.ve loaded for some time. Speaking of metallurgy, you do know that Case hardening is only so many thousands thick, and after flame cutind so much, the metal is not as strong. The backstrap is not really very thick to begin with

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from Zermoid wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Hey Sarg, I was thinking along the same lines too, a undercharge can be just as bad as an overcharge.

Dave, perhaps you will know, several years ago I remember an article about revolver blowup, dunno what Mag or by whom it was written but it was a story that tested the overcharge theory by double loading, by simply scooping the case full of fast powder and shoving in a bullet, almost everything you could think of to produce an overcharge blowup.
Test fired in a vise of course, the worst that happened as far as I remember was swollen cylinders, barrels. No catastrophic blowups.

It was theorized that a round with much less than full case capacity of powder may sometimes "detonate" en mass instead of the normal burn from one end of the powder column to the other, this detonation produces a instant pressure spike that is so sudden that the bullet's inertia cannot be overcome quickly enough to let the pressure lower. Result is the catastrophic blowup.

As far as I know this has never been proven in a lab but does sound logical, especially when intentional overloading cannot account for many of the blowups that have been seen over the years.

I personally load to the top end of the manual's loads but do not exceed it, if it says max load I believe it, altho I too wonder why different manuals can have different MAX Loads for the same powder/bullet/primer combo.
BTW, do not change primers in a recipe, I also read a article about primers, different brands, types of primers can vary the pressure by 1,000's of PSI in a load, if you change the primer used start low and work up looking for pressure signs. Might be the difference between counting to 5 or 10 on your fingers.

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from Ferber wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I believe, and have always believed, powerful loads beyond official handgun recipes, belong in rifles. Why the guy would make such a handload is beyond me. As for hunting with 'traditional' handguns...they're so easy to carry compared to lugging a rifle hither and yon, and are deadly at ranges not usually exceeding 50 yards or so. But if you're lugging a long, single shot
(for example), scoped, 'long-range' handgun in a bigger-than-usual caliber, that's large and bulky, it is STILL a handgun. That's why we have proper rifles.

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from bluecollarkid wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Why is the "on deck" round blown up? Did the over pressure round in the chamber cause the "on deck" round to fire?

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

I NEVER approach rvrn the rcommrndrd max load, just for that reason, I load light .

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from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

A lot of people does not understand what a "flamecut" is or the seriousness of it, especially in Stainless steel revolvers...One observation was a buldge in the barrel, another indication of an extreamly light load. Does anyone agree?

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from yohan wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

This is a VERY good subject with some VERY good posts
I enjoyd reading some ( most ) and also between the lines of a few.
To that end I REALLY do hope the powers that be, at F & S recognize that discussions such as this can be very educational / bennificial to the shooting and hunting sports in general.

Reagrdless of reason, to admit that it happens is the first step
Then taking a short leap of faith,. Subjcts of this type may well be great ammunition to help hold off the anti's.

Meaning if we as sportsmen and those who's business it to sell us magazines and equipment and ammunition and components help sportmen as a groeup to become what Wall street failed misserably at for eight years .
Which is self regulation and control along with overt
attempts to prevent unecessary accidents like this.
(Or Bernie Madoff)
The light that shines upon us as grouop would be a kinder softer light.

Realising full well of course that some guys ( won't mention size. but never seen it in women) simply
"can't not" equate man hood with the size of thier pick up and the vulume of the attending bang, in pursuit of sending a Q-Ball sized projectile down range at 3500 fps.yuk yuk regardles of firearm type.
But it is this bunch that needs our help the most.

Like Mr Petzal and many others who have done a lot of game killing know .
The more you kill the more you realize
There is a killing power thresh hold beyond which is simply more unnecessry bang,.and under no circumstances I am aware of dose that required power level ( IE: bang/ killing power) reach that required to blow up guns and people .

Yall have a nice day

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from yohan wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Sarg
My father was a gun smith and a ballistition (sp)
That said "it don't make me one "
,. but some of it rubbed off and I do have engineering background .

Still I have never seen a pistol (any gun) done in by low charge flame cut ,.. HOWEVER if low charge would detonate rather than burn ,the effect as you say could be rather spectacular.
Think it would need to be just the right low charge tho,.and or maybe wrong powder ,..
Very insightfull Sarg !! and intersting

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from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Clay, I know a fellow who tried a very light load for the .222 I think he learned something the hard way.. Even a compressed load is not as dangerous as a very light load Yes, flame cutting could have been why the backstrap was completely missing, I alway watch flamecutting when tradeing revolvers,especially Stainless. another way to tell if someone has been shooting extreme loads in a SS revolver.

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from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

yohan, alow charge will not flame cut a backstrap, only hot loads, but with the Rear sight milled in and flame cutting in the front the backstrap was probly getting very weak, but yes, a can detinate with disasterous results...low charge, if the powder get away from the primer,

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from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

sarg

What I do know about metallurgy,I don't believe that was a light/squib load. I'm 98% convinced it was a double charge of fast rate powder. That's exactly why I never used Bullseye! I like slow burning even if it's compressed, higher velocities and lower pressures. I weigh each and every round as if it was for a shooting match. For hand gun, I still weigh each and every round for until the powder measure smooths out and even then I still weight every 5th round or so and always followed by a critical visual inspection for consistency of powder level.

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from nc30-06 wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

When I started re0loading, I bought several manuals and read them like novels. Lee has a good one and so does Speer. I read more than these though.
What surprises me is that almost no two loading manuals agree on powder measures for the exact same bullet/powder combination. There seems to always be a variation.
My first re-load was for 9mm. My first round was fired with a little trepidation, even though I had followed recommendations and triple checked everything. Relief came when all was well. The learning had started.
Too bad that guy ruined a quality revolver from a disregard for the safe recommendations or an honest mistake or just carelessness.

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from coho310 wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Somebody could have died,glad no one did though! Next time I shoot a revolver, I'll be careful reloading!

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from Ruckweiler wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Sidewinder and jbird:
I've always referred to those women with "enhancements" as having aftermarket parts.

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from bvk52 wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Another good reminder to wear safety glasses when at the shooting range.
Even if you are not the one who has made the loading mistake, the guy next to you might have been that person.

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from sarg wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

buk52, yes glasses should be worn at the range as well as hearing protection... With most loadings it is hard or impossible to double harge a case, Over charge yes... Many people never check the first charge after changing powders with a Dropper and any kind of powder can get in a case. as someone might do when going from Pistol to rifle cases. I still believe a low charge is more dangerous than an overcharge in most cases. Notice how thin the walls of a revolver cylinder are.......

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from Ruckweiler wrote 4 years 23 weeks ago

Sadly, the old maxims have to be re-learned again and again. For example, don't fire a weapon with a Damascus barrel( I still read that advice now and again) or when hunting, be sure you can identify your target. Unfortunately, there are those among us who either haven't gotten the word or choose to ignore it.

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from Robert Ewing wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

As of yet,I have not loaded my first round [shothell].A month with equipment and I'm still reading .Nice visual not to improvise or take a short cut.

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from sarg wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Zermoid, good post....

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from glucomt wrote 3 years 15 weeks ago

Sometimes, the problem with Americans is in the old adage "some is good, more is better." We try to make everything bigger. Boobs, handloads, and hot rod engines are among that list. http://www.checkshinglessymptoms.com

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from spsdel99 wrote 3 years 11 weeks ago

I learned the hard way also to NEVER reload with friends or family members. Too many distractions, you need to be focused on each step and double check yourself to avoid double charges or empty charges. A couple of years ago I had a .22 S&W pistol blow up at the range. Pieces of the bolt flew out each side. That's why even bystanders should wear eye protection. Anyway, the case was still in the chamber, split at the base. After gathering the pieces, making photos, I called and wrote to the ammo manufacturer. I sent the bolt, cartridge case and remaining ammo to them.
government jobs

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from spsdel99 wrote 3 years 11 weeks ago

you need to be focused on each step and double check yourself to avoid double charges or empty charges. A couple of years ago I had a .22 S&W pistol blow up at the range. Pieces of the bolt flew out each side. That's why even bystanders should wear eye protection. Anyway, the case was still in the chamber, split at the base. After gathering the pieces, making photos, I called and wrote to the ammo manufacturer. I sent the bolt, cartridge case and remaining ammo to them. http://www.egovernmentjobs.in

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from zara454 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

It was wintertime, about 40 degrees outside. I fired several shots at a target some 500 yards away. All went well. On my next shot, however, there was a tremendous explosion. The rifle rose up in the air and flew back over my shoulder. lupus symptoms I was temporarily knocked senseless. I was blinded. I felt a burning sensation in my palm through the leather glove on my (left) trigger hand.

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from zara454 wrote 3 years 10 weeks ago

It was wintertime, about 40 degrees outside. I fired several shots at a target some 500 yards away. All went well. On my next shot, however, there was a tremendous explosion. The rifle rose up in the air and flew back over my shoulder. http://www.checklupussymptoms.com I was temporarily knocked senseless. I was blinded. I felt a burning sensation in my palm through the leather glove on my (left) trigger hand.

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from glucomt wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Sadly, the old maxims have to be re-learned again and again. For example, don't fire a weapon with a Damascus barrel( I still read that advice now and again) or when hunting, be sure you can identify your target. http://www.checkmonosymptoms.com

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from glucomt wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

A waste of a nice gun....that is another reason I'm not a big fan of max loads...some people re-load to push the envelope, others like me, do it to save money and tweek accuracy...I'm usually a fan of moderate loads, http://www.automobileupdates.com guns, powder, and brass end up lasting longer, and for the most part they are just as deadly and usually more accurate...

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from glucomt wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Too many distractions, you need to be focused on each step and double check yourself to avoid double charges or empty charges. A couple of years ago I had a .22 S&W pistol blow up at the range. Pieces of the bolt flew out each side. That's why even bystanders should wear eye protection. Anyway, the case was still in the chamber, split at the base. After gathering the pieces, making photos, I called and wrote to the ammo manufacturer. I sent the bolt, cartridge case and remaining ammo to them.
http://www.jobsnresults.com/keane-placement-papers-question-papers/

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from semp wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I've never used Win powder. But the start load for Win231 for a 44 RemMag using 165gr cast bullets is 6.0 grains. While the start load of Win296 for the same round is 29 grains . Now I don't know, becaus I've not used these powders, BUT ... if it's physically possible to swap these powders THEN that's a HUGE error . If that swap took place then this fella is being watched over by some deity and was lucky to just lose a gun.

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from borrath wrote 2 years 51 weeks ago

I search a long time for this article. Thnaks a lot for this information.

iddaa tahminleri

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from frae wrote 2 years 48 weeks ago

That is pretty hilarious. I mean, the "tweety birds" part, I think that's kinda humorous. But kidding aside, I'm glad nothing serious happens to this man.

Physics Games

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from rockey wrote 2 years 47 weeks ago

This is a great inspiring article.I am pretty much pleased with your good work.You put really very helpful information. Keep it up. Keep blogging. Looking to reading your next post.
http://www.austintxrealestate.biz/

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from jotsautumn wrote 2 years 20 weeks ago

Clean up after the pistol lot is done just like you were going out of the country for a month. Sanitize the area. Have a glass of tea, then go back to the bench. Assemble all components for the rifle load, double-check with manual, check again. Secure all items not required for that load in the cabinet and have NOTHING that is not required for that particular load anywhere near the bench. http://www.generalupdates.com

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from harryautumn wrote 2 years 20 weeks ago

One day he was tired ,.but decided to include a box of his special( dip stick brand) home rolled wad cutters in a deal he made to sell a chrome s & w 44 mag
Dont recall the model. But it was a prety pistol as I remeber it .Ivory grips ,. the whole she-bang as it were

A few days later the guy who bought the pistol from ole dip stick, showed up with the pistol.
Which was opened up like a can of beans left on fire with out poking holoes in it, a small bandage on his head .and a few stitches in his hand
http://www.automobilehouse.com

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from gayatrimanvi wrote 2 years 20 weeks ago

Of course "ole dip stick" the pistoleer was incenced at first,.. as it seemd impossible to him. That as infalable as he had become in his lengthy (6 month) career as a pistoleer and reloader. anything remotly ( incorrect ) with anything he did in that arena could not possibly happen. http://www.automobileupdates.com

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from mohanautumn wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

I used to weigh every 5th, then I ruined a Ruger P89 while shooting double taps at the range. The first was a squib load, followed quickly by a live round; naturally, they were both my own reloads. Fortunately for me, I was shooting low power rounds I had loaded or it could have damaged more than the gun. Now every round is weighed and any discrepancy gets its charge dumped into the scale and reweighed. Strangely, my groups have tightened up. http://www.thyroidsymptomsfacts.com

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from nidhivohra33 wrote 2 years 18 weeks ago

Clean up after the pistol lot is done just like you were going out of the country for a month. Sanitize the area. Have a glass of tea, then go back to the bench. Assemble all components for the rifle load, double-check with manual, check again. Secure all items not required for that load in the cabinet and have NOTHING that is not required for that particular load anywhere near the bench. http://www.bedbugbitescure.com

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from lohman wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

he was very lucky

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from mojsan wrote 2 years 5 days ago

I have an 1187 12 gauge and it's a great gun but it is a bit heavy. I also have a full size 870 20 gauge but I think the combination of the weight and recoil adds up for her. She can hit early on with it, but tires quickly. I think I'm going with the super x3, 20 gauge. Maybe a youth model, but I am going to keep my eyes out for that Benelli m1-90.

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