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Shotgun Shell Review: A First Look at Federal's New Prairie Storm Pheasant Loads

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November 19, 2009

Shotgun Shell Review: A First Look at Federal's New Prairie Storm Pheasant Loads

By Phil Bourjaily

The pellets you see here make up the content of a pre-production sample of Federal’s new Prairie Storm pheasant loads,  a lead version of their Black Cloud.  The normal looking shot is copper-plated 4s. They are mixed with “Flitestoppers,” which are also 4s but have rings around them that look like Saturn, or like WWI helmets. The white stuff is buffer, which helps the pellets keep their shape as they go down the barrel.

Both pellets and the buffer are loaded into ...

... the Flitecontrol wad, a solid shotcup that holds the pellets together for the first 15-20 feet out of the muzzle (rather than beginning to spread immediately upon leaving the muzzle as is the case with other types of shotcups), tightening patterns and increasing downrange velocity slightly.  The Flitestoppers are loaded first with the copper pellets on top. That way, the round pellets can draft for the less aerodynamic ridged pellets.

The Flitestoppers are nasty little things, at least, on the basis of the autopsies I performed on a couple of roosters I’ve been able to shoot with them. The ones I have dug out of the carcasses did indeed leave larger and more ragged wound channels than did the round 4s thanks to the ridges around the pellets. Contrary to my expectations, the ridges on the pellets I recovered survived passing through to the far side of the bird fairly intact.

Prairie Storm will be available at first in 4 shot, 1 1/4-ounce, 2 3/4-inch loads at 1500 fps.  They are unnecessarily fast, at least in my recoil-sensitive opinion (“Ringneck Rocket” was the other name the Federal marketing people considered), and I could certainly feel them going off in my lightweight Benelli Montefeltro. They wouldn’t be bad to shoot out of a gas gun, though. Besides, speed sells, the name is cool, and they seem to work. I suspect they will develop a cult following like the one that has grown up around the steel Black Cloud.

My standby pheasant poison will likely remain the milder-kicking yet deadly 1 1/4 ounces of 5 or 6 shot at 1330 fps, but I’m looking forward to shooting up my two sample boxes of Prairie Storm in the meantime and reporting back.

Comments (31)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Mjenkins1 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Welp, how necessary is the "combo" shot charge? Other than that, I am a Federal fan, so i guess it sounds good too me.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

just another reason to fo shooting. i'll have to try them. how do they compare to the black cloud performance wise. would have to be good to get me away from those!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

We could have used some of those in Kansas Monday and Tuesday. The birds were flushing long in the rain, snow, sleet and wind! As you said the old fashioned #5's in a high brass load worked well for standard duty.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

That new Flitestopper just seems deadly. Should also work great on turkey (Remington's 4/6 shot load works well). Not sure why I haven't done this before but I will put together some mixed shot loads to see how they pattern and work on upland birds.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Robert Ewing wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

I would like to hear more about those larger ragged wound channels.My concern is for having to clean them and hand them to my fussy chef.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 86Ram wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Looks like a devastating combo. WOW. Can't wait to see more rviews.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from coho310 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Cool design with the Flitestoppers,and I also wanna know,does the buffer effect FPS?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from bassman3-15 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

You really can't beat Federals for the price, and this new load looks very promising. I think I'll try it for skeet though.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Wonder if this will be as effective as heavy shot loads.
Like Bee said it was rough out there Mon and Tue. We lost several birds that fell yet evaded the dogs and was never recovered.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ejunk wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

I have read, but not experienced on my own (I've stuck with winchester), that Black Cloud loads are very dirty. is that true for black cloud steel shot or these loads?

yrs-
Evan!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from wingshooter54 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Like I said in Petzal's last blog; if new ammunition and guns didn't come out frequently, gun writers would have to get real jobs. Perhaps the pheasants in other states are bigger, tougher,(bionic?) and more heavily feathered than pheasant here in the Texas Panhandle. A 16 ga. 1 oz.
load of 6's in a modified & full double gun is perfectly aadequate for the pheasant we encounter here. I am somewhat allergic to guns or cartridges that kick the snot out of me and find I shoot better with easy recoil.
A pheasant centered with 7/8 to 1 oz of 6's goes in the bag.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Right on, Wingshooter. But us old school types mostly have to shake our heads because the "gadgety is better" mentality permeates our society. It's there on the camoflage fashionistas that hit the woods every fall with new break up suits, scent lock, and autumn make up shades of cosmetics dandied all over their foppish faces, it's there in the porcine armchair hunters who cruise dirt roads or simply make new ones as they hunt from their quads, and it's there in the minds of guys who have a combination GPS-radio-cheese grater unit but who can't figure out what the "N" on a compass is for, and who can't read a map.

So all hail the newfangled gadget. From the NEW shotshell to the latest technology for bombing mud huts, gadgety is the thing these days.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from brutherford wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

As a fellow Texas Panhandler, I'm with Wingshooter. In fact, that's my load, too. It keeps me from trying to reach out too far and wounding birds. If they're flushing wild, I switch to my 12 with good 'ol 5s. Those and my old yellow Lab seldom let me down.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

I hate that buffering, snit leaks out and gets into the action and magazine tube!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Is the buffer stuffing toxic?
I'll give the stuff a try; nasty terminal cutting is good to not lose birds!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckeyeben wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

sounds like a great shot combination

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckeyeben wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

when will they be available or are they already?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from SD Bob wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

It always amazes me when something new is introduced how anti innovation people can be. Whatever is being used right now, at one point was the newest innovation around and thankfully enough people chose to use these new gimmicks otherwise we'd still be pouring our shot down the muzzle of our guns.

Not everyone centers a pheasant everytime a shot presents itself, in fact, I've seen hunting shows where Benelli's Tom Knapp has missed so what stuff like this represents is an "option" that helps take less lethal hits and make them lethal.

If you've tried Black Cloud then you know that flite stopper wad makes hitting targets that flush at your feet or decoy right on top of you difficult because the pattern has yet to open. Pandering to Phil here, he wrote about taking your time to mount your gun and if you chose any ammo with the flite stopper wad, you'll need to heed this advice.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Maybe these new shells will bear out. I have concerns.

Density of pattern within 35-yds is what kills upland birds. How much density of pattern is obtained with these new shells over the standard w/plastic shot cup?

It seems there’s monumental effort…that comes with high costs…. to gain velocity without blowing patterns. Is the improvement gainful?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from sskbkrdg wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

All is well and interesting about this load. When the heck is somebody going to come out with an "improved" buckshot load??. We don't have pheasants here, and the quail are 'bout gone too.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nic Meador wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

It amazes when some people buy this stuff and think they'll kill more bird when you can buy a box of #4 lead for a lot cheaper and still kill a limit.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from louismanka wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

I like to try new things, it is how I got into pheasant hunting at the age of 27. So I will try the new loads with there group controlling wad floppers and copper coated mini fillet knives. Why? Because it is new, and there is always something fun about new. My guess is that I will use these in late December, when it is about 20 below 0 and I am hunting ground that has been tackled by a hundred different hunters.
Would I prefer to use what I know? What I have shot for years? Yes, yes I would. I would love to use my sweet little Ruger Red Label 20ga. with a light load of #6. Minnesota birds though seem to add some feathers when the temps go sub-zero and the roosters left know the sounds and sights of hunters. Getting within 30 yards of wild roosters in the late season, it happens, but not often. So I reach for the 12ga. and #2 or BB loads. I put on six layers of clothes, and boots. Ski googles for when the wind kicks the snow up and the wind chill freezes snot in my beard. Snow that has a little crust on it so that pheasants can flee like the road runner while my three Goldens make like it's the Iditarod with me loping behind in snowshoes. Prairie Storm Loads that help me get a shot at those late season roosters? Sounds like a great idea to me. I hope they come out with a Blizzard BB load actually.
Go out try something new, come hunt the tundra with me. You bring your 16ga. I will bring buffered wing nuts flying at 1700fps. I'll even let you have first shot. You might want to practice shooting wearing snow shoes though, it is harder then you would think. The people at the shooting range will think you are nuts, but if you are like me, then that wouldn't be something new at all.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from louismanka wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

I like to try new things, it is how I got into pheasant hunting at the age of 27. So I will try the new loads with there group controlling wad floppers and copper coated mini fillet knives. Why? Because it is new, and there is always something fun about new. My guess is that I will use these in late December, when it is about 20 below 0 and I am hunting ground that has been tackled by a hundred different hunters.
Would I prefer to use what I know? What I have shot for years? Yes, yes I would. I would love to use my sweet little Ruger Red Label 20ga. with a light load of #6. Minnesota birds though seem to add some feathers when the temps go sub-zero and the roosters left know the sounds and sights of hunters. Getting within 30 yards of wild roosters in the late season, it happens, but not often. So I reach for the 12ga. and #2 or BB loads. I put on six layers of clothes, and boots. Ski googles for when the wind kicks the snow up and the wind chill freezes snot in my beard. Snow that has a little crust on it so that pheasants can flee like the road runner while my three Goldens make like it's the Iditarod with me loping behind in snowshoes. Prairie Storm Loads that help me get a shot at those late season roosters? Sounds like a great idea to me. I hope they come out with a Blizzard BB load actually.
Go out try something new, come hunt the tundra with me. You bring your 16ga. I will bring buffered wing nuts flying at 1700fps. I'll even let you have first shot. You might want to practice shooting wearing snow shoes though, it is harder then you would think. The people at the shooting range will think you are nuts, but if you are like me, then that wouldn't be something new at all.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from green pond mike wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Sounds like you need to keep the shots out to at least 35 yards or you won't have much bird left to eat.Sskbkrdg,it's the same way here where I live as far as pheasants and quail are concerned.Mostly just deer,squirrel and turkey.Not many rabbits except on the dirt road that leads out to the cahaba river slab.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from spiaailtli wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

In the past I always tried to use soft lead shot for the same reason. I found the hard shot performed more like steel. The key was to select the right size for proper penetration.

I like the new loads from Federal for sure!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Armchair Mike wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

We tend to forget that although we pursue the same animals, the conditions where we hunt can differ tremendously. I'm positive that a Texas panhandle pheasant differs from one that is feathered up for a South Dakota or Kansas winter as much as an Alberta whitetail differs from a Texas deer. Del and Bee, it was rough out there Monday and Tuesday. I'm glad to be back in Sweet Home Alabama with a cooler full of pheasants shot with #4 and #5 heavy field loads. I was carrying a double choked approximately improved modified and full.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from murdock32 wrote 4 years 6 weeks ago

It sounds like the bird ends up being Minch meat, I like a clean kill with the least amount of damage, and less shot in my teeth...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from radkins_72 wrote 3 years 34 weeks ago

when you shoot these make sure you hold the gun tight to your shoulder they kick real good lots of power they will make your teeth rattle butt on the other hand they will take down a bird real easy.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 3 years 31 weeks ago

In western Kansas after opening weekend, I've considered a 45-70 or even .458 Win Mag. Them boids is tough. But since I relish the dish pheasant almost as much as the quarry pheasant, I tend to gun down a bit and count on a good dog for support for the less than DRT roosters.

Murdock 32: Minch meat can be made tasty with the proper cooking. In Western Scandinavian countries it's even considered a delicacy, being cooked over an open fire and served with a Creole/bean curd sauce.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from plevena1 wrote 3 years 22 weeks ago

I tried em,one gives a pretty good kick, but they made both barrels of my Daly o/u go off at the same time. It was however a very dead pheasant!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Al-fromPA wrote 3 years 11 weeks ago

Anyone have a problem with this new ammo jamming. My Super Black Eagle didn't like it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wild Bill Kelso wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Regarding Federal's Prairie Storm, and its related product Black Cloud, shotgun ammunition I'm a believer.

"Cult Folowing" seems to be appropriate phraseology.

If you take the time to read the box, i.e. how they throw a full choke pattern out of an Improved Cylinder choke, and also compare the ballistics of the four Prairie Storm loads available - I think the 12 ga 2-3/4" loading is going to be the one that gives rise to its reputation.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Mike Diehl wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Right on, Wingshooter. But us old school types mostly have to shake our heads because the "gadgety is better" mentality permeates our society. It's there on the camoflage fashionistas that hit the woods every fall with new break up suits, scent lock, and autumn make up shades of cosmetics dandied all over their foppish faces, it's there in the porcine armchair hunters who cruise dirt roads or simply make new ones as they hunt from their quads, and it's there in the minds of guys who have a combination GPS-radio-cheese grater unit but who can't figure out what the "N" on a compass is for, and who can't read a map.

So all hail the newfangled gadget. From the NEW shotshell to the latest technology for bombing mud huts, gadgety is the thing these days.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

just another reason to fo shooting. i'll have to try them. how do they compare to the black cloud performance wise. would have to be good to get me away from those!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from brutherford wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

As a fellow Texas Panhandler, I'm with Wingshooter. In fact, that's my load, too. It keeps me from trying to reach out too far and wounding birds. If they're flushing wild, I switch to my 12 with good 'ol 5s. Those and my old yellow Lab seldom let me down.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mjenkins1 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Welp, how necessary is the "combo" shot charge? Other than that, I am a Federal fan, so i guess it sounds good too me.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

We could have used some of those in Kansas Monday and Tuesday. The birds were flushing long in the rain, snow, sleet and wind! As you said the old fashioned #5's in a high brass load worked well for standard duty.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from MLH wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

That new Flitestopper just seems deadly. Should also work great on turkey (Remington's 4/6 shot load works well). Not sure why I haven't done this before but I will put together some mixed shot loads to see how they pattern and work on upland birds.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Robert Ewing wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

I would like to hear more about those larger ragged wound channels.My concern is for having to clean them and hand them to my fussy chef.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 86Ram wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Looks like a devastating combo. WOW. Can't wait to see more rviews.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from coho310 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Cool design with the Flitestoppers,and I also wanna know,does the buffer effect FPS?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from bassman3-15 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

You really can't beat Federals for the price, and this new load looks very promising. I think I'll try it for skeet though.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Wonder if this will be as effective as heavy shot loads.
Like Bee said it was rough out there Mon and Tue. We lost several birds that fell yet evaded the dogs and was never recovered.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ejunk wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

I have read, but not experienced on my own (I've stuck with winchester), that Black Cloud loads are very dirty. is that true for black cloud steel shot or these loads?

yrs-
Evan!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from wingshooter54 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Like I said in Petzal's last blog; if new ammunition and guns didn't come out frequently, gun writers would have to get real jobs. Perhaps the pheasants in other states are bigger, tougher,(bionic?) and more heavily feathered than pheasant here in the Texas Panhandle. A 16 ga. 1 oz.
load of 6's in a modified & full double gun is perfectly aadequate for the pheasant we encounter here. I am somewhat allergic to guns or cartridges that kick the snot out of me and find I shoot better with easy recoil.
A pheasant centered with 7/8 to 1 oz of 6's goes in the bag.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from louismanka wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

I like to try new things, it is how I got into pheasant hunting at the age of 27. So I will try the new loads with there group controlling wad floppers and copper coated mini fillet knives. Why? Because it is new, and there is always something fun about new. My guess is that I will use these in late December, when it is about 20 below 0 and I am hunting ground that has been tackled by a hundred different hunters.
Would I prefer to use what I know? What I have shot for years? Yes, yes I would. I would love to use my sweet little Ruger Red Label 20ga. with a light load of #6. Minnesota birds though seem to add some feathers when the temps go sub-zero and the roosters left know the sounds and sights of hunters. Getting within 30 yards of wild roosters in the late season, it happens, but not often. So I reach for the 12ga. and #2 or BB loads. I put on six layers of clothes, and boots. Ski googles for when the wind kicks the snow up and the wind chill freezes snot in my beard. Snow that has a little crust on it so that pheasants can flee like the road runner while my three Goldens make like it's the Iditarod with me loping behind in snowshoes. Prairie Storm Loads that help me get a shot at those late season roosters? Sounds like a great idea to me. I hope they come out with a Blizzard BB load actually.
Go out try something new, come hunt the tundra with me. You bring your 16ga. I will bring buffered wing nuts flying at 1700fps. I'll even let you have first shot. You might want to practice shooting wearing snow shoes though, it is harder then you would think. The people at the shooting range will think you are nuts, but if you are like me, then that wouldn't be something new at all.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from louismanka wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

I like to try new things, it is how I got into pheasant hunting at the age of 27. So I will try the new loads with there group controlling wad floppers and copper coated mini fillet knives. Why? Because it is new, and there is always something fun about new. My guess is that I will use these in late December, when it is about 20 below 0 and I am hunting ground that has been tackled by a hundred different hunters.
Would I prefer to use what I know? What I have shot for years? Yes, yes I would. I would love to use my sweet little Ruger Red Label 20ga. with a light load of #6. Minnesota birds though seem to add some feathers when the temps go sub-zero and the roosters left know the sounds and sights of hunters. Getting within 30 yards of wild roosters in the late season, it happens, but not often. So I reach for the 12ga. and #2 or BB loads. I put on six layers of clothes, and boots. Ski googles for when the wind kicks the snow up and the wind chill freezes snot in my beard. Snow that has a little crust on it so that pheasants can flee like the road runner while my three Goldens make like it's the Iditarod with me loping behind in snowshoes. Prairie Storm Loads that help me get a shot at those late season roosters? Sounds like a great idea to me. I hope they come out with a Blizzard BB load actually.
Go out try something new, come hunt the tundra with me. You bring your 16ga. I will bring buffered wing nuts flying at 1700fps. I'll even let you have first shot. You might want to practice shooting wearing snow shoes though, it is harder then you would think. The people at the shooting range will think you are nuts, but if you are like me, then that wouldn't be something new at all.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Armchair Mike wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

We tend to forget that although we pursue the same animals, the conditions where we hunt can differ tremendously. I'm positive that a Texas panhandle pheasant differs from one that is feathered up for a South Dakota or Kansas winter as much as an Alberta whitetail differs from a Texas deer. Del and Bee, it was rough out there Monday and Tuesday. I'm glad to be back in Sweet Home Alabama with a cooler full of pheasants shot with #4 and #5 heavy field loads. I was carrying a double choked approximately improved modified and full.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

I hate that buffering, snit leaks out and gets into the action and magazine tube!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Is the buffer stuffing toxic?
I'll give the stuff a try; nasty terminal cutting is good to not lose birds!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckeyeben wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

sounds like a great shot combination

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckeyeben wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

when will they be available or are they already?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from sskbkrdg wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

All is well and interesting about this load. When the heck is somebody going to come out with an "improved" buckshot load??. We don't have pheasants here, and the quail are 'bout gone too.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nic Meador wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

It amazes when some people buy this stuff and think they'll kill more bird when you can buy a box of #4 lead for a lot cheaper and still kill a limit.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from green pond mike wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Sounds like you need to keep the shots out to at least 35 yards or you won't have much bird left to eat.Sskbkrdg,it's the same way here where I live as far as pheasants and quail are concerned.Mostly just deer,squirrel and turkey.Not many rabbits except on the dirt road that leads out to the cahaba river slab.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from spiaailtli wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

In the past I always tried to use soft lead shot for the same reason. I found the hard shot performed more like steel. The key was to select the right size for proper penetration.

I like the new loads from Federal for sure!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from SD Bob wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

It always amazes me when something new is introduced how anti innovation people can be. Whatever is being used right now, at one point was the newest innovation around and thankfully enough people chose to use these new gimmicks otherwise we'd still be pouring our shot down the muzzle of our guns.

Not everyone centers a pheasant everytime a shot presents itself, in fact, I've seen hunting shows where Benelli's Tom Knapp has missed so what stuff like this represents is an "option" that helps take less lethal hits and make them lethal.

If you've tried Black Cloud then you know that flite stopper wad makes hitting targets that flush at your feet or decoy right on top of you difficult because the pattern has yet to open. Pandering to Phil here, he wrote about taking your time to mount your gun and if you chose any ammo with the flite stopper wad, you'll need to heed this advice.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 4 years 22 weeks ago

Maybe these new shells will bear out. I have concerns.

Density of pattern within 35-yds is what kills upland birds. How much density of pattern is obtained with these new shells over the standard w/plastic shot cup?

It seems there’s monumental effort…that comes with high costs…. to gain velocity without blowing patterns. Is the improvement gainful?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from murdock32 wrote 4 years 6 weeks ago

It sounds like the bird ends up being Minch meat, I like a clean kill with the least amount of damage, and less shot in my teeth...

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from radkins_72 wrote 3 years 34 weeks ago

when you shoot these make sure you hold the gun tight to your shoulder they kick real good lots of power they will make your teeth rattle butt on the other hand they will take down a bird real easy.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 3 years 31 weeks ago

In western Kansas after opening weekend, I've considered a 45-70 or even .458 Win Mag. Them boids is tough. But since I relish the dish pheasant almost as much as the quarry pheasant, I tend to gun down a bit and count on a good dog for support for the less than DRT roosters.

Murdock 32: Minch meat can be made tasty with the proper cooking. In Western Scandinavian countries it's even considered a delicacy, being cooked over an open fire and served with a Creole/bean curd sauce.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from plevena1 wrote 3 years 22 weeks ago

I tried em,one gives a pretty good kick, but they made both barrels of my Daly o/u go off at the same time. It was however a very dead pheasant!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Al-fromPA wrote 3 years 11 weeks ago

Anyone have a problem with this new ammo jamming. My Super Black Eagle didn't like it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wild Bill Kelso wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Regarding Federal's Prairie Storm, and its related product Black Cloud, shotgun ammunition I'm a believer.

"Cult Folowing" seems to be appropriate phraseology.

If you take the time to read the box, i.e. how they throw a full choke pattern out of an Improved Cylinder choke, and also compare the ballistics of the four Prairie Storm loads available - I think the 12 ga 2-3/4" loading is going to be the one that gives rise to its reputation.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

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