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Coyote or Wolf? Missouri Hunter Shoots 80-Pound Mystery Animal

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November 05, 2012

Coyote or Wolf? Missouri Hunter Shoots 80-Pound Mystery Animal

By Chad Love

It might be a few months before a Missouri hunter finds out what, exactly, he shot earlier this week. It may be a monster coyote, or it may be something else.

[140-Pound Missouri Coyote Determined to Be Wolf]

From this story on http://www.kctv5.com/story/19981645/hunter-shoots-possible-wolf-in-howar... " target="_blank">kctv.com:
The hunter whose bow and arrow ended the life of the 80-pound animal near Boonville, MO, Tuesday told investigators he thought it was a coyote. Wildlife Regional Supervisor John George believes it was an honest mistake. "Most people in Missouri are going to have some frequency of occurrence with coyotes, they're quite common. With wolves, the majority of the time it's probably somebody's large dog that they're seeing," said John George with the Missouri Department of Conservation. The hunter reported his kill to the department of conservation officials who then turned it over to the science division for testing. DNA samples were collected and the animal's corpse was stored in a freezer.

The largest coyote on record anywhere weighed 74 pounds, so this is either one mother of a coyote, or it's something else. Question is, what? Remember, this isn't the first time something weird's been shot in Missouri. It happened last year, too, when a 104-pound coyote was determined to be a wolf.

Comments (27)

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from small game sportsman wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

thats a wolf

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Looks like someone's German Shepherd.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from hhack wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

I think we all know that it is not a coyote. Is it a hybrid domestic wolves that people are turning loose, or are they migrants coming in from the Great Lakes region. It is only about 250 miles from Wisconsin to Missouri well within range for a young male that was kicked out of his pack. about ten years back a young male wolf was caught in a snare near Morgan, Utah. Dwr came in and took it alive and determined it was a young male that had just been kicked out of a pack in Yellowstone. Morgan, Ut to Lamar Valley Yellowstone around 300 miles. Just something to think about.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

It's a woof.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dbetzner wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

looks like a wolf... or someones malamute... but survey definanlty dosnt say coyote to me

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jaukulele wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

I'd say it's a domestic. It looks like it's got an awful large forehead for any type of wild dog.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hunterandfarmer wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

It looks like a wolf to me. I am from NE Kansas and have relatives that have seen wolves here. I have not seen any wolves but I have seen 2 mountain lions, the first one I saw was coal black, the second was the usual tan color. Have had many neighbors within 1 mile see big cats too. Wolves are bound to show up sooner or later because of our high deer population and a lot of cattle. The results of the DNA test should be interesting on that Missery canine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jerry A. wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

I agree with Dbetzner. It looks like a Malamute or a cross thereof. I think someone is missing their pet in the Booneville area.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sanjuancb wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Yep, definitely a domestic breed or a hybrid with a wolf. Doesn't even remotely resemble a coyote...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from OCD wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Perhaps I am being paranoid.

The one last year was killed in Carroll County, and this one near Boonville. The man in both picture looks very similar.

Seems fishy...

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jfily wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

How about a wolf coyote hybrid? Although I think they have mostly been found farther east.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Deb Browne wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Might be someone's pet! probably would be good idea to identify it BEFORE shooting it.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from idduckhntr wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

If it is someone's pet it shouldn't be running loose in the woods where there are people trying to hunt deer.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from makersman wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

It looks like my dog a husky/shepherd

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from rfleer87 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

More wolf than a coyote

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from fishman417 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

wolf

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bioguy01 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Looks like a wolf to me. I'm interested to see what the DNA results tell us about it's origin.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from habben97 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

maybe it is a coydog

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gary Devine wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Or a coywolf if there is such a thing?
Most wolves kill coyotes.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nathan Ryver wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

I hope it doesn't turn out to be a dog.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from circle8 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

A few years ago in Ontario, (I think that was the Province)Canada two coyotes attacked and killed a local folk singer while she hiked on a foot path in the forest. Witnesses saw the coyotes as they tried to protect their kill. Because of the animals appearance Canada requested the assistance of an expert from Ohio and he traveled to Canada to join the investigation. He determined that the animals responsible for the attack (they were killed by rangers) were a mix of wolves and coyotes. He said the two breeds probably mated during the during normal estrus because of availability instead of anything else. The DNA mix of the dead coyotes was part of his exam plus their size and aggressiveness helped in his conclusions. If whitetails and mulies can interbreed there is no reason to think coyotes and wolves won't do the same. In fact the biologists in the Yukon have identified a polar and brown bear hybrid. That animal in the photo is probably the result of a similar mating as in the Canadian animals.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Brian Phipps wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

The fatal coyote attack was in the province of Nova Scotia, was in '09 I think.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Leslie Stock wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

It looks like a German Shepherd Sable Coat. The broad fore head would indicate that it is decended from German Blood lines. The coat itself looks like the animal had been brushed an maintained.
I have been a Shepherd owner for over thirty years. I prefer the German Shepherds from German Blood lines.
If Shepherds are interbreeding with Wolves you have trouble. There is a breed where they have done exactly that. The breed group was called "Timber Sherperds". It was an attempt to reduce Hip problems in Shepherds.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from bounty1 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

That's a coyote tail. And the hide looks coyote. Other then that, can't really tell.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Looks like a Swedish Elkhound, but also a wolf. Clearly not a coyote.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from red dickerson wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

definatly not a coyote

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Melissa Gates wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

It is very possible that it is a hybrid between a coyote and an eastern Wolf. This hybrid breed is becoming more common in Ontario and subsequently moving as the population increases. The carefully managed eastern wolf population (distinguished from the grey timber wolf) is on the rise and there seems to be less hesitation with the growing population to interbreed with coyotes but will not tolerate living in the same area for hunting and feeding. Fifty years ago the wolf population had been decimated, and the white tail population exploded as a response, this allowed the northerly range of deer to increase dramatically, in turn pushing north the range of Moose as well. Following north the deer was the coyote which was also beginnign to feel the squeeze from expansion of farmland and cities in southern Ontario. When the Value of the Wolf was realized, (sometime in the early 70's) a management plan was put in place by then interbreeding had begun to take place as coyotes had become very familiar to the Wolves. All of this to say? Coyotes that have been interbred with Wolves in Ontario and within Quebec now grow to much larger sizes, have many more pounds per square inch in biting strength, may travel in packs yet still maintains the wily makeup and fearlessness of populated areas. The growing pure wolf population and range pushes the hybrids away and they seek out areas that were once part of the natural wolf range (Eastern Canada down to Texas). It is very possible that this is one of the hybrids moving west from the GLSL area. Remote telemetry research has recorded a migration of coyotes, hybrids and Wolves. -- Ontario Outdoorsmen

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Looks like someone's German Shepherd.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from small game sportsman wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

thats a wolf

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hhack wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

I think we all know that it is not a coyote. Is it a hybrid domestic wolves that people are turning loose, or are they migrants coming in from the Great Lakes region. It is only about 250 miles from Wisconsin to Missouri well within range for a young male that was kicked out of his pack. about ten years back a young male wolf was caught in a snare near Morgan, Utah. Dwr came in and took it alive and determined it was a young male that had just been kicked out of a pack in Yellowstone. Morgan, Ut to Lamar Valley Yellowstone around 300 miles. Just something to think about.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jaukulele wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

I'd say it's a domestic. It looks like it's got an awful large forehead for any type of wild dog.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sanjuancb wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Yep, definitely a domestic breed or a hybrid with a wolf. Doesn't even remotely resemble a coyote...

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from idduckhntr wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

If it is someone's pet it shouldn't be running loose in the woods where there are people trying to hunt deer.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from makersman wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

It looks like my dog a husky/shepherd

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Leslie Stock wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

It looks like a German Shepherd Sable Coat. The broad fore head would indicate that it is decended from German Blood lines. The coat itself looks like the animal had been brushed an maintained.
I have been a Shepherd owner for over thirty years. I prefer the German Shepherds from German Blood lines.
If Shepherds are interbreeding with Wolves you have trouble. There is a breed where they have done exactly that. The breed group was called "Timber Sherperds". It was an attempt to reduce Hip problems in Shepherds.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Melissa Gates wrote 1 year 17 weeks ago

It is very possible that it is a hybrid between a coyote and an eastern Wolf. This hybrid breed is becoming more common in Ontario and subsequently moving as the population increases. The carefully managed eastern wolf population (distinguished from the grey timber wolf) is on the rise and there seems to be less hesitation with the growing population to interbreed with coyotes but will not tolerate living in the same area for hunting and feeding. Fifty years ago the wolf population had been decimated, and the white tail population exploded as a response, this allowed the northerly range of deer to increase dramatically, in turn pushing north the range of Moose as well. Following north the deer was the coyote which was also beginnign to feel the squeeze from expansion of farmland and cities in southern Ontario. When the Value of the Wolf was realized, (sometime in the early 70's) a management plan was put in place by then interbreeding had begun to take place as coyotes had become very familiar to the Wolves. All of this to say? Coyotes that have been interbred with Wolves in Ontario and within Quebec now grow to much larger sizes, have many more pounds per square inch in biting strength, may travel in packs yet still maintains the wily makeup and fearlessness of populated areas. The growing pure wolf population and range pushes the hybrids away and they seek out areas that were once part of the natural wolf range (Eastern Canada down to Texas). It is very possible that this is one of the hybrids moving west from the GLSL area. Remote telemetry research has recorded a migration of coyotes, hybrids and Wolves. -- Ontario Outdoorsmen

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

It's a woof.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dbetzner wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

looks like a wolf... or someones malamute... but survey definanlty dosnt say coyote to me

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from hunterandfarmer wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

It looks like a wolf to me. I am from NE Kansas and have relatives that have seen wolves here. I have not seen any wolves but I have seen 2 mountain lions, the first one I saw was coal black, the second was the usual tan color. Have had many neighbors within 1 mile see big cats too. Wolves are bound to show up sooner or later because of our high deer population and a lot of cattle. The results of the DNA test should be interesting on that Missery canine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jerry A. wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

I agree with Dbetzner. It looks like a Malamute or a cross thereof. I think someone is missing their pet in the Booneville area.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jfily wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

How about a wolf coyote hybrid? Although I think they have mostly been found farther east.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rfleer87 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

More wolf than a coyote

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from fishman417 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

wolf

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bioguy01 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Looks like a wolf to me. I'm interested to see what the DNA results tell us about it's origin.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from habben97 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

maybe it is a coydog

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gary Devine wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Or a coywolf if there is such a thing?
Most wolves kill coyotes.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nathan Ryver wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

I hope it doesn't turn out to be a dog.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from circle8 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

A few years ago in Ontario, (I think that was the Province)Canada two coyotes attacked and killed a local folk singer while she hiked on a foot path in the forest. Witnesses saw the coyotes as they tried to protect their kill. Because of the animals appearance Canada requested the assistance of an expert from Ohio and he traveled to Canada to join the investigation. He determined that the animals responsible for the attack (they were killed by rangers) were a mix of wolves and coyotes. He said the two breeds probably mated during the during normal estrus because of availability instead of anything else. The DNA mix of the dead coyotes was part of his exam plus their size and aggressiveness helped in his conclusions. If whitetails and mulies can interbreed there is no reason to think coyotes and wolves won't do the same. In fact the biologists in the Yukon have identified a polar and brown bear hybrid. That animal in the photo is probably the result of a similar mating as in the Canadian animals.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Brian Phipps wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

The fatal coyote attack was in the province of Nova Scotia, was in '09 I think.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from bounty1 wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

That's a coyote tail. And the hide looks coyote. Other then that, can't really tell.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Looks like a Swedish Elkhound, but also a wolf. Clearly not a coyote.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from red dickerson wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

definatly not a coyote

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from OCD wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Perhaps I am being paranoid.

The one last year was killed in Carroll County, and this one near Boonville. The man in both picture looks very similar.

Seems fishy...

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Deb Browne wrote 1 year 23 weeks ago

Might be someone's pet! probably would be good idea to identify it BEFORE shooting it.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

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