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Testing Rain Coats in a Car Wash

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March 10, 2011

Testing Rain Coats in a Car Wash

By Kirk Deeter

You come up with the next extreme gear challenge, and you get the gear.

by Kirk Deeter

I'll go to any length to test gear to its limits...well, almost any length. Remember the motorcycle reel test? Well, my latest "mad scientist" folly will appear in the May issue of Field & Stream, and it involves me wearing popular fishing rain gear through a car wash to check it out. You'll have to read the issue for the results, but it was a pretty fair test. I wore a gray sweatsuit under the rain coats and pants, endured the jet rinse (that hurts, by the way) and any soaked spots underneath earned negative points.

I want to do more of this type of testing, but I need your help. I'll make you a simple deal. If you come up with a test that fairly and reliably measures the performance of one piece of fly gear against others (could be rods, reels, lines, waders, whatever...), I'll not only do it, I'll give the person who comes up with the test concept the winning gear.

But it has to be a real test. Of course, offbeat is preferred...but this isn't a contest to suggest "wacky ways for Deeter to torture himself and fishing gear." There should be some baseline hypothesis, consistent variables, and a clear performance benchmark. The motorcycle test challenged reels by amping up the acceleration speeds (more than fish could make) as line was pulled off those reels. The car wash test was a simple pass-fail, wet-dry performance under simulated extreme conditions.

What's your best test idea? Go for it...I'm not afraid.

Comments (27)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Koldkut wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Which reels are most resistant to freezing up, I hate it when a fish take the fly and I lose it due to a reels hydro-seizure problems in cold weather. My hypothesis is that a reel with the fewest junction points and the most water-break surface will seize the least. Testing must be done while the ambient temperature is not more than 15 degrees Fahrenheit. Ensure that the reels are all tested with the same flyline, possibly two brands to cover the sharkskin phenomenon where that line may hold more water. All reels will have their drag set with a scale to a pre-determined setting. Using a rod stand and motor to operate the reel at a constant speed for all reels and hold the rod at the same angle to provide the same water wicking from the guides(which should be oversized to prevent the line from jumping or wagging from ice on the guides). Strip out a reasonable distance of line, say 50', and let it drift downstream for a predetermined period of time, say 30 seconds at the full 50', and reel it in without holding the line, at a constant speed until the leader/line junction is at the tip of the rod. Let the reel set for 20 minutes, then measure the resistance it takes to peel the same amount of line off with a scale to measure resistance, if any caused by freezing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from pete5645 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Test the warmth of various neoprene waders (of the same thickness) using thermometers placed in various locations (feet, thighs, chest, etc.). This could alse be done with gore-tex breathable waders as well.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Make sure you don't click the wax button before you get under the shower. And for koldkut...all reels freeze up under freezing conditions...called bar time. Get off the water.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Koldkut wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Car waders testing. Test two extremes of leaving your waders in a hot/cold car, folded up. Using a freezer or oven, fold the waders like most do, take them out of the oven/freezer and see which ones develop tears/leaks first.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from pete5645 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Test how waterproof fly boxes are. Stuff each box with paper/piece of cardboard/piece of chamois, and toss it into a jacuzzi or whirl pool with the jets on. Its not often that you would be holding your fly box under water, but more likely that it would go for a ride down stream, and that jets would mimic that faster moving water.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from pete5645 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Test various brands of dry fly foatant. Apply the same amount of different brands to the same fly pattern. place them in a large bowl with water and submerge each of them at the same time (repeatedly) until only one remains floating.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

And to remedy the freezing up reels for koldkut...If you are good...take the spool out and put the spool in your pocket, one that won't allow it to get out, and cast the line with no reel on the rod. Got to be able to play fish knowing how to use the rod for drag, and not the reel.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from TM wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

1. Waders. Wear waders while picking raspberries (or hunting grouse) to mimic a year's worth of wear on the trout stream. Take them to a photography dark room. Place lanterns in each stocking foot. Count holes. (Not sure I'd want the gear after this test, but I'd be interested in finding the toughest waders)

2. Boots. Submerge slaps of limestone in a stream (or unused koi pond) until algae forms (2 weeks). Fill boots with lead. Glue a rope attached to a force meter to toes of each boot. Find out which boots provide the most frictional resistance to sliding. End the felt sole debate once and for all.

3. Reels and line. Take 5 tupperwear containers. Fill with silty water. Insert a reel into each tupperwear container. Place all 5 in freezer until solid. Remove from freezer. Thaw and inspect for damage.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Andrew Bosway wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Take reels and spool them with plenty of line and backing. Attach the line to a truck/atv and test the drag systems durability with constant acceleration/top speed. Would be curious to see what stands up to that kind of intense running

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

ambosway..I once was fishing on the Yakima River with railroad tracks running parallel to the river up above me. I made a long backcast, and hooked a train that got way into my backing before I landed it. Oh, I was using a Pflueger Medalist.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from cTXn wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

I'm interested to find out which sit-on-top kayak is least prone to flipping over. I'm particularly curious to find out which brand/model can handle a person standing upright while fishing without tipping over, and whether or not outriggers would actually help. It would also be interesting to see what brand/model can hold up to turbulence with a sitting fisherman aboard. As far as testing this goes, maybe try being pulled behind a ski-boat.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Fisher Boy wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

test out cold weather gear in an industrial freezer. take an initial temp. before starting with a thermometer in between your body and the gear, and then get in the freezer and measure continue measuring temp. set each degree of drop-age to be a point system. add a couple of large fans for wind too. have fun

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from crazycrell wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

A good way to test the durability of waders is to find a path with a lot of branches, twigs, brushes, etc, the worse the better. Walk down the path, then step in the water and see if there are any leaks, repeat.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from fflutterffly wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Gloves: Winters are hell on hands. I'd like to see Kirk take gloves into a meat locker, via Rocky, and test the effective materials for insulation.

Wader insulation: Once again Kirk can take waders into the locker as well and test them for warmth and then, the same waders are subjected to UV lamps to test their durability for extreme heat and cracking under extreme sun-exposure.

Waders: Durability of top of the line Waders- place a nice heavy object-anvil- on the waders and drag them behind a car for 20 yard, 50 yards, 75 yard, and see how they fair

Tim: Test durability: Using a palm camera. ie. Pextax, purchase a good quality sling shot, find a nice brick wall, a vice, a table and something to insure all draws are of equal length. Pull back, launch and splat.
Water-tight test: Salt water test- go see Conway Bowman. Go out to a deep trench and lower the camera's down below the tested depth and see if they still work. and while you're there catch a few Mako for the rest of us.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Joe Demalderis wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

It seems universally accepted that amber sunglasses allow the best "through the water" visibility, and most often I've found that to be true. What I've never seen is a test done with different brands and different lens colors in an objective situation. All the tests are whether or not you can see fish better, but many of us know that some people can't see the tree for the forest and water or no water many anglers still wouldn't see the fish.

So, after that long intro., what about testing colors and makes of polarized sunglasses by using an eye chart or something along those lines (maybe reading the cover of F&S)on the bottom of the stream/river? First take a test reading of the chart above water,at the same distance to establish a baseline...

Also, maybe a test on using the Solunar Tables for fly selection.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nympho wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Sunglasses:
I'm tough on sunglasses - they always seem to break at the temple hinge. I'm currently using a cheap pair which have good polarization, and flexibility, but poor optics.

Testing Criteria:
1. Hold all glasses up to camera/video as you look for fish in sunny and shaded conditions.
2. Test different lens hues.
3. Test different "light transmission" (for example, I'm looking at Kaenon Rhino's - they offer a C12 -which apparently is a normal range for most sunglasses, and they offer a C28 for purportedly better vision in shadows).
4. Glass typically offers (me) the best optics, but are heavier (test the nose dent factor) than polycarbonate lenses that sctatch easily.
5. Test the temple hinge (I'm looking for a "reasonable forgiveness factor" - a bit of give before they break).

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from VAHunter540 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Very simple, let’s see how much you can arm curl using different fly rods as the lifting device. Attach a 1 or 2lb (or heavier as needed) weight to some strong fly line and attach the line to the tip of various brands and styles of rods. Test the strength and durability of each rod. I would test 2 piece, 4 piece and 1 piece set ups. You could also use this test to try and determine the max weight a rod + reel + line = can hold. So this accounts for the line strength, rod strength and the drag on the reel.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Leek wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Wading boot grip: Run across an ice rink and back (around cones for agility?). 5 second deduction for each fall. Fastest time wins. Different categories for studded vs. non-studded boots.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from HuntinFool wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Shotguns, freezing and fouling up / misfiring due to extreme weather conditions.
What lubricant to use to prevent problems in extreme cold weather, ie. graphite dry lube vs. oils.
Simulated hunting conditions... freeze the gun(s) in a freezer for an hr or two and then throw some clays. disassemble, clean lube, repeat. etc.

Not sure if I would get a new shotgun or some great lube if you chose this test, but, either way I would like to see the results.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from eyesearch wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

I would like to see you test the strength of heavy duty saltwater fly rods. My hypothesis is this: By stressing the rods with equal amounts of heavy weight, the last one to snap is the strongest.
Using an unbreakable line (maybe even a steel cable), suspend a large container from each rod. Start filling the containers with equal amounts of water and see which is the last to snap.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from HuntinFool wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

oops... guess I should have read the guidelines better before I posted.

How about wader durability testing through a wild blackberry patch. lol

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Joe Demalderis wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

How about a test for the fly tiers out there on the hook holding ability of various vises from low end to top end. You could tighten a hook down in each vice and then use some sort of mechanism to pull the hook free. You could combine this with the strength of various hook brands too.

Also, though I'd hate to see Deeter get a belly ache, it would be interesting to see which brands of beef jerky and packaged sausages (like Slim Jims) last the longest in the back of a vest or chest pack after they've been opened. I'll donate the Imodium ;)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from markmarko50 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

what i want to see is a real tool that gets the barb pinched so a wildlife agent doesn't hang it up in a patch of silk he/she uses to enforce barbless fishing waters, so if Deeter has the tool in mind he won't be afraid to poke himself with a hook past the pinched barb (it shouldn't draw much more blood than the self test used by diabetics everyday...if the tool works).

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ruckweiler wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

My wife saw this and she said "Do you wonder why girls think boys are crazy?" I replied, "And your point is what?"

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wags wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Not sure how "extreme" this is, but I would love to see comparisons of knotless tapered leaders and braided leaders to see how they lay out a fly. Maybe fix a rod, pull back the line to load it (kinda like a bow), then let it fly to see what combinations lay it out there the best.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RPOutside wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

A bunch of folks have problems with allergies while on the river. Could you do a test to see which powdered floatant prevents a runny nose the longest? Frogs Fanny, Rio AgentX dry shake, Loon Top Ride or Shimakaze.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Joshua Rust wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

To be honest, most "gear tests" ignore those weaknesses brought on by time. I hear reviews raving about a jacket that kept someone dry during a trip to Alaska, but found out it was only for a week. If you want to really test something, give it to someone who works outside. Want to test the durability of a rainjacket? Give it to a construction worker. Want to see if it keeps someone dry the entire time? Give it to a valet attendant to use during a rainy weekend. Everything works right out of the box, its if it keeps working long after its come out of it that's the real question.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Koldkut wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Car waders testing. Test two extremes of leaving your waders in a hot/cold car, folded up. Using a freezer or oven, fold the waders like most do, take them out of the oven/freezer and see which ones develop tears/leaks first.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from pete5645 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Test various brands of dry fly foatant. Apply the same amount of different brands to the same fly pattern. place them in a large bowl with water and submerge each of them at the same time (repeatedly) until only one remains floating.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from TM wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

1. Waders. Wear waders while picking raspberries (or hunting grouse) to mimic a year's worth of wear on the trout stream. Take them to a photography dark room. Place lanterns in each stocking foot. Count holes. (Not sure I'd want the gear after this test, but I'd be interested in finding the toughest waders)

2. Boots. Submerge slaps of limestone in a stream (or unused koi pond) until algae forms (2 weeks). Fill boots with lead. Glue a rope attached to a force meter to toes of each boot. Find out which boots provide the most frictional resistance to sliding. End the felt sole debate once and for all.

3. Reels and line. Take 5 tupperwear containers. Fill with silty water. Insert a reel into each tupperwear container. Place all 5 in freezer until solid. Remove from freezer. Thaw and inspect for damage.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

ambosway..I once was fishing on the Yakima River with railroad tracks running parallel to the river up above me. I made a long backcast, and hooked a train that got way into my backing before I landed it. Oh, I was using a Pflueger Medalist.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from fflutterffly wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Gloves: Winters are hell on hands. I'd like to see Kirk take gloves into a meat locker, via Rocky, and test the effective materials for insulation.

Wader insulation: Once again Kirk can take waders into the locker as well and test them for warmth and then, the same waders are subjected to UV lamps to test their durability for extreme heat and cracking under extreme sun-exposure.

Waders: Durability of top of the line Waders- place a nice heavy object-anvil- on the waders and drag them behind a car for 20 yard, 50 yards, 75 yard, and see how they fair

Tim: Test durability: Using a palm camera. ie. Pextax, purchase a good quality sling shot, find a nice brick wall, a vice, a table and something to insure all draws are of equal length. Pull back, launch and splat.
Water-tight test: Salt water test- go see Conway Bowman. Go out to a deep trench and lower the camera's down below the tested depth and see if they still work. and while you're there catch a few Mako for the rest of us.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Joe Demalderis wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

It seems universally accepted that amber sunglasses allow the best "through the water" visibility, and most often I've found that to be true. What I've never seen is a test done with different brands and different lens colors in an objective situation. All the tests are whether or not you can see fish better, but many of us know that some people can't see the tree for the forest and water or no water many anglers still wouldn't see the fish.

So, after that long intro., what about testing colors and makes of polarized sunglasses by using an eye chart or something along those lines (maybe reading the cover of F&S)on the bottom of the stream/river? First take a test reading of the chart above water,at the same distance to establish a baseline...

Also, maybe a test on using the Solunar Tables for fly selection.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Nympho wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Sunglasses:
I'm tough on sunglasses - they always seem to break at the temple hinge. I'm currently using a cheap pair which have good polarization, and flexibility, but poor optics.

Testing Criteria:
1. Hold all glasses up to camera/video as you look for fish in sunny and shaded conditions.
2. Test different lens hues.
3. Test different "light transmission" (for example, I'm looking at Kaenon Rhino's - they offer a C12 -which apparently is a normal range for most sunglasses, and they offer a C28 for purportedly better vision in shadows).
4. Glass typically offers (me) the best optics, but are heavier (test the nose dent factor) than polycarbonate lenses that sctatch easily.
5. Test the temple hinge (I'm looking for a "reasonable forgiveness factor" - a bit of give before they break).

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from eyesearch wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

I would like to see you test the strength of heavy duty saltwater fly rods. My hypothesis is this: By stressing the rods with equal amounts of heavy weight, the last one to snap is the strongest.
Using an unbreakable line (maybe even a steel cable), suspend a large container from each rod. Start filling the containers with equal amounts of water and see which is the last to snap.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from HuntinFool wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

oops... guess I should have read the guidelines better before I posted.

How about wader durability testing through a wild blackberry patch. lol

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ruckweiler wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

My wife saw this and she said "Do you wonder why girls think boys are crazy?" I replied, "And your point is what?"

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Koldkut wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Which reels are most resistant to freezing up, I hate it when a fish take the fly and I lose it due to a reels hydro-seizure problems in cold weather. My hypothesis is that a reel with the fewest junction points and the most water-break surface will seize the least. Testing must be done while the ambient temperature is not more than 15 degrees Fahrenheit. Ensure that the reels are all tested with the same flyline, possibly two brands to cover the sharkskin phenomenon where that line may hold more water. All reels will have their drag set with a scale to a pre-determined setting. Using a rod stand and motor to operate the reel at a constant speed for all reels and hold the rod at the same angle to provide the same water wicking from the guides(which should be oversized to prevent the line from jumping or wagging from ice on the guides). Strip out a reasonable distance of line, say 50', and let it drift downstream for a predetermined period of time, say 30 seconds at the full 50', and reel it in without holding the line, at a constant speed until the leader/line junction is at the tip of the rod. Let the reel set for 20 minutes, then measure the resistance it takes to peel the same amount of line off with a scale to measure resistance, if any caused by freezing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from pete5645 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Test how waterproof fly boxes are. Stuff each box with paper/piece of cardboard/piece of chamois, and toss it into a jacuzzi or whirl pool with the jets on. Its not often that you would be holding your fly box under water, but more likely that it would go for a ride down stream, and that jets would mimic that faster moving water.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

And to remedy the freezing up reels for koldkut...If you are good...take the spool out and put the spool in your pocket, one that won't allow it to get out, and cast the line with no reel on the rod. Got to be able to play fish knowing how to use the rod for drag, and not the reel.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Andrew Bosway wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Take reels and spool them with plenty of line and backing. Attach the line to a truck/atv and test the drag systems durability with constant acceleration/top speed. Would be curious to see what stands up to that kind of intense running

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from cTXn wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

I'm interested to find out which sit-on-top kayak is least prone to flipping over. I'm particularly curious to find out which brand/model can handle a person standing upright while fishing without tipping over, and whether or not outriggers would actually help. It would also be interesting to see what brand/model can hold up to turbulence with a sitting fisherman aboard. As far as testing this goes, maybe try being pulled behind a ski-boat.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Fisher Boy wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

test out cold weather gear in an industrial freezer. take an initial temp. before starting with a thermometer in between your body and the gear, and then get in the freezer and measure continue measuring temp. set each degree of drop-age to be a point system. add a couple of large fans for wind too. have fun

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from crazycrell wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

A good way to test the durability of waders is to find a path with a lot of branches, twigs, brushes, etc, the worse the better. Walk down the path, then step in the water and see if there are any leaks, repeat.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from VAHunter540 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Very simple, let’s see how much you can arm curl using different fly rods as the lifting device. Attach a 1 or 2lb (or heavier as needed) weight to some strong fly line and attach the line to the tip of various brands and styles of rods. Test the strength and durability of each rod. I would test 2 piece, 4 piece and 1 piece set ups. You could also use this test to try and determine the max weight a rod + reel + line = can hold. So this accounts for the line strength, rod strength and the drag on the reel.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Leek wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Wading boot grip: Run across an ice rink and back (around cones for agility?). 5 second deduction for each fall. Fastest time wins. Different categories for studded vs. non-studded boots.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from HuntinFool wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Shotguns, freezing and fouling up / misfiring due to extreme weather conditions.
What lubricant to use to prevent problems in extreme cold weather, ie. graphite dry lube vs. oils.
Simulated hunting conditions... freeze the gun(s) in a freezer for an hr or two and then throw some clays. disassemble, clean lube, repeat. etc.

Not sure if I would get a new shotgun or some great lube if you chose this test, but, either way I would like to see the results.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Joe Demalderis wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

How about a test for the fly tiers out there on the hook holding ability of various vises from low end to top end. You could tighten a hook down in each vice and then use some sort of mechanism to pull the hook free. You could combine this with the strength of various hook brands too.

Also, though I'd hate to see Deeter get a belly ache, it would be interesting to see which brands of beef jerky and packaged sausages (like Slim Jims) last the longest in the back of a vest or chest pack after they've been opened. I'll donate the Imodium ;)

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from markmarko50 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

what i want to see is a real tool that gets the barb pinched so a wildlife agent doesn't hang it up in a patch of silk he/she uses to enforce barbless fishing waters, so if Deeter has the tool in mind he won't be afraid to poke himself with a hook past the pinched barb (it shouldn't draw much more blood than the self test used by diabetics everyday...if the tool works).

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Wags wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Not sure how "extreme" this is, but I would love to see comparisons of knotless tapered leaders and braided leaders to see how they lay out a fly. Maybe fix a rod, pull back the line to load it (kinda like a bow), then let it fly to see what combinations lay it out there the best.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RPOutside wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

A bunch of folks have problems with allergies while on the river. Could you do a test to see which powdered floatant prevents a runny nose the longest? Frogs Fanny, Rio AgentX dry shake, Loon Top Ride or Shimakaze.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Joshua Rust wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

To be honest, most "gear tests" ignore those weaknesses brought on by time. I hear reviews raving about a jacket that kept someone dry during a trip to Alaska, but found out it was only for a week. If you want to really test something, give it to someone who works outside. Want to test the durability of a rainjacket? Give it to a construction worker. Want to see if it keeps someone dry the entire time? Give it to a valet attendant to use during a rainy weekend. Everything works right out of the box, its if it keeps working long after its come out of it that's the real question.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from pete5645 wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Test the warmth of various neoprene waders (of the same thickness) using thermometers placed in various locations (feet, thighs, chest, etc.). This could alse be done with gore-tex breathable waders as well.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 3 years 6 weeks ago

Make sure you don't click the wax button before you get under the shower. And for koldkut...all reels freeze up under freezing conditions...called bar time. Get off the water.

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment