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Tie Talk: How to Tie the "D-Rib Golden Stone" Fly (Step-by-Step Photo Instructions)

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March 21, 2012

Tie Talk: How to Tie the "D-Rib Golden Stone" Fly (Step-by-Step Photo Instructions)

By Tim Romano

This week's fly, brought to us by Flyrecipes.com was created by Carl Pennington and is called the D-Rib Golden stone.

Carl says, "This nymph was designed for the South Platte River in Colorado. Mainly the Cheeseman Canyon section. The fly works great anywhere you find golden stone nymphs. I typically fish this nymph as a upper fly on a 2 fly nymph rig, or I will fish it as the middle fly on a 3 fly nymph rig. It can also be fished by dead drifting, bouncing along the bottom." You can find the fly tied commercially by Montana Fly Company, and in many quality fly shops.

Click here to see the step-by-step photo instructions for tying this fly.

Comments (4)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

If you'll tie it with a tungston bead at the head, or, at least a metal bead, it will serve purpose to take down the small, trailer fly you've tied off your dropper at the bend of the stonefly. In the cold water we are now having a midge pupa works well as a trailer, even a SanJuan worm works well....small PT nymph.

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from jamesti wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

stone flies are some of the hardest for me to tie. i'll give this one a try though.

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from Sayfu wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Stoneflies do not have to be jamesti...IF you take the position of many good stonefly tier/fishermen, and just dub/taper (thinner in the abdomen, and thicker up front for the thorax) maybe rib the abdomen, and palmer a hackle up front through the thorax and you are done. I would use a metal, or tungstun bead at the head to get it down. The thinking is stones are found in faster, choppy water, bolder stream water, pocket water, and the fish does not get a good look at the stone, a good syllouette is fine, and all you need. You can even hang these up and break them off so why take a lot of time, and tie a lot of definition? I don't even care for the goose biot tails as they bend out of shape, provide no action because they are stiff. I'd rather use a bit of hackle. You can tie down some swiss straw at the thorax, wrap your dubbing, wrap your hackle then pull the shiny swiss straw over the thorax to create a shellback, and done. But you don't even need the shellback really.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Koldkut wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Rather than venture out and use this pattern, like everything else I tie, I looked up pics of real stoneflies and got after it this weekend. It took about 4 flies, but I'm happy with what came off the vise, all rubber legs, flash back, no shellback thorax....but it looks good. For whatever reason, the medium V-rib I bought in olive was way darker than the v-rib olive in midge I normally use on other patterns, it was too dark to come out looking like the fly above. I really got after it since I pulled a brown out on a hot wired prince and was reminded that I needed larger bugs in the arsenal too.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Sayfu wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

If you'll tie it with a tungston bead at the head, or, at least a metal bead, it will serve purpose to take down the small, trailer fly you've tied off your dropper at the bend of the stonefly. In the cold water we are now having a midge pupa works well as a trailer, even a SanJuan worm works well....small PT nymph.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

stone flies are some of the hardest for me to tie. i'll give this one a try though.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Stoneflies do not have to be jamesti...IF you take the position of many good stonefly tier/fishermen, and just dub/taper (thinner in the abdomen, and thicker up front for the thorax) maybe rib the abdomen, and palmer a hackle up front through the thorax and you are done. I would use a metal, or tungstun bead at the head to get it down. The thinking is stones are found in faster, choppy water, bolder stream water, pocket water, and the fish does not get a good look at the stone, a good syllouette is fine, and all you need. You can even hang these up and break them off so why take a lot of time, and tie a lot of definition? I don't even care for the goose biot tails as they bend out of shape, provide no action because they are stiff. I'd rather use a bit of hackle. You can tie down some swiss straw at the thorax, wrap your dubbing, wrap your hackle then pull the shiny swiss straw over the thorax to create a shellback, and done. But you don't even need the shellback really.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Koldkut wrote 2 years 3 weeks ago

Rather than venture out and use this pattern, like everything else I tie, I looked up pics of real stoneflies and got after it this weekend. It took about 4 flies, but I'm happy with what came off the vise, all rubber legs, flash back, no shellback thorax....but it looks good. For whatever reason, the medium V-rib I bought in olive was way darker than the v-rib olive in midge I normally use on other patterns, it was too dark to come out looking like the fly above. I really got after it since I pulled a brown out on a hot wired prince and was reminded that I needed larger bugs in the arsenal too.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

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