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Knife Review: The Diamond Blade Meridian

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March 14, 2013

Knife Review: The Diamond Blade Meridian

By David E. Petzal

Those of you who follow my rantings and ravings are aware of my creepy—bordering on unnatural—fondness for Diamond Blade knives. I think they’re about the best working knives you can buy, both because of their excellent design, and because they will stay sharper longer than anything else that cuts. This is not based on gutting one deer; it’s based on the 100 yards of ½-inch manila rope which I reduced to nothing, half an inch at a time, over the course of several years, slicing away with all sorts of knives to see which kept their bite longest. A number of them did extremely well, but none could match a Diamond Blade.

If you’re new to the name, Diamond Blades are made of D2 steel, which is common in the knife biz, but the edges are subjected to a unique process called Friction Forging, which subjects the metal to great heat and immense pressure. (It’s an adaptation of the technique by which submarine hulls are joined together.) This results in a blade whose edge is so hard that its Rockwell number is off the chart (65 to 68 on the C scale; 62 is regarded as absolute max on conventionally tempered blades) while the spine is Rc 42-45, about as hard as a rifle receiver.

The result is the same as Japanese swordsmiths achieved with katana blades—an extremely sharp, durable edge, and a nearly unbreakable blade. I once watched a Diamond Blade bent double in a vise, then bent straight again, and it didn’t care much if at all.

Now there is a new knife in the line of such transcendent excellence and luminous superiority that my aged, gnarled fingers are scarcely able to type words to describe it. Whatever. It’s called the Meridian, and is a hunting/general purpose knife with a slim, drop-pointed 4 ½-inch blade, a 440C guard, and a nice, long, Suregrip handle, which is the same checkered synthetic used on Knives of Alaska cutlery. At 6 ounces, the Meridian is quite light and comes with an excellent sheath that is fiber-lined to keep the blade from punching through.

As a pure hunter, I would like the Meridian better if it had a slightly shorter, wider blade with a bit more belly. On the other hand, it’s better at a wide range of tasks than a pure hunter, and makes a terrific kitchen knife.

A note of caution: Diamond Blades will rust or pit if they are put away wet, dirty, or bloody. I’ve seen this happen to a number of them, and it’s beyond me why someone would pay this kind of money for a knife and then not give it at least minimum maintenance. But there you are.

At $375, the Meridian is at the low end of the Diamond Blade price range. You may be reluctant to pay that much for a knife where there are so many other good ones available for a lot less money, but I’ve been using them since they came out, and I’m not.

Comments (41)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Ol Krusty wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I'm sold, where can I buy one? I was going to purchase a Black Jack model 125 knife, but now I think I'll just hold on and save up a couple more bucks and get an even better blade.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Purchased my Diamondblade at the SCI convention in Las Vegas just over a year ago. Best knife I've ever held in my hand.

After purchasing dozens of knives over the years, it's nice to know I've purchased the last one.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

If you should need to sharpen it eventually, it it any more difficult?

How about with something like a Worksharp?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Dave; I am quoting you here: "based on the 100 yards of ½-inch manila rope which I reduced to nothing, half an inch at a time, over the course of several years, slicing away with all sorts of knives to see which kept their bite longest. A number of them did extremely well” Which ones?

Got results? Did you keep good records of your testing? F&S has become the De Facto Consumer Reports of Outdoor Gear. I for one would like to see where my favorite brand stacks up.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hermit crab wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I appreciate the quality and craftsmanship associated with the knife, but I'm not sure I'd like a knife that I don't need to resharpen. Touching up my broadheads and hunting knife are one of the things I really appreciate about hunting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Have been Lucy enough to own and use hard many fine custom knives. My Diamond Blade is at the top of the list

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Mean to write lucky instead of Lucy. Freudian slip?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

My wife always has room for another pair of shoes and a Coach purse to match her latest business outfit and that costs alot more than a Diamond Blade. Time for a roadtrip to Cabela's with some of the boys.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

To OlKrusty: Go to diamondbladeknives.com.

To Amflyer: On those rare occasions when a DB does need a touchup, I use a CrockStick. The odd thing is, that despite the hard edge, it touches up easily. Or you can send it back to Diamond Blade and they'll do it for you.

To Rocky Squirrel: Tragically, I don't keep records of anything for more than a month or so after the article appears. I can, however, tell you from memory that two of the best edge holders I've tested in the past few years are the Wayne Fears knives from American tool and the handmade knives from Mike Malosh.

To Happy Myles: Freud said that sometimes a cigar is only a cigar. Don't worry about it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 2Poppa wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Like you Dave I prefer a "slightly shorter, wider blade with a bit more belly", to get the job done.
This beauty has to be one of the new ones I'll purchase this year.
I like the hole in the handle where I tie a piece of leather for a better grasp.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from gijustin wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I'm not sold. Maybe it's just me, but I don't have $400 to spend on a knife. I bought a knife 10 years ago that was homemade by a mountain man in Alaska. I stopped by his house on my way to the Arctic Cirle. There was a handmade sign on the road that said "Homemade knives this way -->" So I went over and bought a fine knife that I have skinned deer with ever since. It's beautiful and was less than half the price of one of these. I love my knife and I have a great story to pass on to my children about the knife.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Just one question Dave how easy is it to resharpen? Like guns need to be reloaded. Any knife will need to be resharpened. Correctly sharpening a knife has been a popular post for some on this site.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

After reading the literature which came with my Diamondblade I decided sending it back to the factory for sharpening would be the best thing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

To Carl Huber: I don't know what you'd have to do to one to actually dull it, so sharpening becomes a question of taking it back to razor sharp from merely sharp. For that I use a Crock Stick, and it's very easy.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Blue Ox wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Ka Bar makes one of their USMC knives (model 1282) out of D2, for just over a hundred bucks. The only drawback (for me anyway) is the blade is semi serrated.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Dave; Thanks for the call back and advice!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bwana Hunter wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Hey David: I see that you've given the nod to a super fine knife with a blade guard. Old habits and hunches die hard, but with this important must have inclusion of mine for a new blade - I'm in..!

Best/Bwana

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Great posts lately guys. Now if I could just get my hands on an M-14, Luger .45, or Diamond Blade knife. The knife is looking like my best bet. I take my old Buck Zipper to the local Bass Pro shop every year for a free sharpening but it has never really impressed me. I can't complain though, I drive a Chevy Silverado not a Lamborghini.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Probably is a great knife in every way but simply has the appearance of one of my wife's Chicago Cutlery kitchen knifes.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RJ Arena wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

@ Ishawooa,
Funny that you said this, I was thinking the same thing when I first saw this knife! I also think the blade should be wider.I like the toughness and sure-grip of the handle, but at this price point I would like to see some nice wood, Cocobolo, Bolivian Rosewood or maybe Snakewood.
again there is that price, I like all of my knives, and while in the field there is nothing better than always picking up a sharp knife, sharpening my knives has brought me pleasure,bringing an edge back and honing it, much more fun than cleaning my guns!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

BlueOx; Sorry, but I can't imagine trying to use a 7" blade combat knife for hunting. Unless maybe someone is gutting an elephant.

I really like the shape of that knife but I could never justify paying that much money for one. Give one of those away for a photo labeling contest and I guarantee I'll be screwing my thinking cap on pretty tight to win it!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Ishawooa: My sympathies to your wife! Got two sets of Chicago Cutlery kitchen knives for my first wedding. I have seen toilet paper that was sharper and held a blade better than those things. Ugh!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

RJ,
I believe Diamond Blade has various handle material options to selec from

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RJ Arena wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

@Happy Myles, Great! Now I have little if any argument against getting one,I guess I could sell an old rifle I don't shoot much! Boy that is sick, selling a gun to buy a knife! maybe I can sell a lawnmower and teach the dogs to eat grass!

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I can throw away 18 Cold Steel Pendleton Lite Hunter's and still have one left.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

WAM,
Think you answered the question when you indicated you wouldn't mind throwing away 17 Cold Steel Pendleton knives. Just joking. Have a couple of fine knives made by Lloyd Pendleton is he part of Cold Steel?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Happy,

As I understand it, Lynn Thompson of Cold Steel bought the first knife that Lloyd Pendleton ever made. They now produce two of Lloyd's most popular knives, the Lloyd Pendleton Hunter and Mini Hunter. These knives duplicate Lloyd's work as accurately as possible.

They got together with Lloyd and designed the Pendleton Lite Hunter. The only major changes were the adoption of German 4116 Stainless steel and polypropylene handles.

Mine are extremely sharp and hold an edge, but nowhere near the quality of the Lloyd Pendleton blades or Diamond Blade knives. But at the ridiculously low price they sell for, they are disposable for someone like me who does not appreciate good blades and loses them before they get dull.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I trust Dave's faith in these knives,but for now the $$ is too steep for my taste!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Douglas wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Great looking knife! Yet my old case will do me for the 20 years or so I have left.
I guess I could get one to leave to my grandsons and start some kind of family fight when I'm gone.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Steve in Virginia wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I like it, although I generally prefer an all purpose hunting knife that has a tip with a slightly sharper angle (makes field dressing on certain parts of animal a tad easier).

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

As for knife sharpening I do a great job but I keep hearing differnt opinions in regard to degree of angle. I've always shapened fillets at 19-20 degree for extra sharpness but less durability and kitchen and hunting knives at 23-25 degree for sharpness but more durability. I have been told I'm wrong. I don't think so, any thoughts?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dale freeman wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Dave,
I sure would like to make a hunt with you sometime.
I like a man that is honest and straight foreward and is what he is.
Thank you for being a real American.
They're geting scarce as hen's teeth.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dale freeman wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Dave,
I sure would like to make a hunt with you sometime.
I like a man that is honest and straight foreward and is what he is.
Thank you for being a real American.
They're geting scarce as hen's teeth.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dale freeman wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Dave;
I sure would like to make a hunt with you sometime.
I like a man that is straight foreward and honest, a man that is what he is.
Thanks for being a real American.
They're getting short as hen's teeth.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dale freeman wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

sorry about the three post.
The web site is getting no better.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gavin McNaughton wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Do you ever use collective intelligence for your topics and other discustional writings @Field and Stream?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I simply don't need a hunting knife so good that I would spend that kind of money on one. I don't place my blades in a vise and bend them 180 degrees and back.
Ditto for rifle scopes costing $1,000 and more.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gavin McNaughton wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I'd rather go with a cold steel mini ak-47 knife its wicked sharp great blade point and handle, they also have a smaller mini ak-47 knife which I have and use alot for haybailler twine, opening boxes, mail, and a easy but not as a safe alternative to our cutlery shears.Id also recomend buying cold steel knifes off of a online tactical distributer for cheaper price!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gavin McNaughton wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

might check out SOG knifes to test, heard there pretty good but i never ownned one! I do belive that cold steel are one of the leaders but not sure as in what ranking they have but they do give you knife and sword proof on their dvds and even advertise inferno pepperspray,and big bore blowguns.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beagl1 wrote 1 year 3 weeks ago

The blade of Meridian has the same shape as my Remington Hunter marked RH made in USA 51.
Eviscerated a doe last fall with it, OO buck & a 50 year old semi.
The old crap still does the job.vjcfe

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hornd wrote 1 year 2 weeks ago

I have been heartbroken by loosing several decent knives. I pulled a towel out of my pocket fishing and sent one to the bottom this summer. I now carry $10 Kershaws. They get the job done and if I lose it, I get another out of the drawer. Also many many many knives have been left behind after gutting a deer. Saftey Orange knives and flashlights are harder to lose. I'm surprised nobody has mentioned Ceramic knives which are harder than D2. I never had a Boker or Timberline, but we do have them for kitchen knives.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from RJ Arena wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

@Happy Myles, Great! Now I have little if any argument against getting one,I guess I could sell an old rifle I don't shoot much! Boy that is sick, selling a gun to buy a knife! maybe I can sell a lawnmower and teach the dogs to eat grass!

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Happy,

As I understand it, Lynn Thompson of Cold Steel bought the first knife that Lloyd Pendleton ever made. They now produce two of Lloyd's most popular knives, the Lloyd Pendleton Hunter and Mini Hunter. These knives duplicate Lloyd's work as accurately as possible.

They got together with Lloyd and designed the Pendleton Lite Hunter. The only major changes were the adoption of German 4116 Stainless steel and polypropylene handles.

Mine are extremely sharp and hold an edge, but nowhere near the quality of the Lloyd Pendleton blades or Diamond Blade knives. But at the ridiculously low price they sell for, they are disposable for someone like me who does not appreciate good blades and loses them before they get dull.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I can throw away 18 Cold Steel Pendleton Lite Hunter's and still have one left.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ol Krusty wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I'm sold, where can I buy one? I was going to purchase a Black Jack model 125 knife, but now I think I'll just hold on and save up a couple more bucks and get an even better blade.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Purchased my Diamondblade at the SCI convention in Las Vegas just over a year ago. Best knife I've ever held in my hand.

After purchasing dozens of knives over the years, it's nice to know I've purchased the last one.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

If you should need to sharpen it eventually, it it any more difficult?

How about with something like a Worksharp?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from RockySquirrel wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Dave; I am quoting you here: "based on the 100 yards of ½-inch manila rope which I reduced to nothing, half an inch at a time, over the course of several years, slicing away with all sorts of knives to see which kept their bite longest. A number of them did extremely well” Which ones?

Got results? Did you keep good records of your testing? F&S has become the De Facto Consumer Reports of Outdoor Gear. I for one would like to see where my favorite brand stacks up.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from gijustin wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I'm not sold. Maybe it's just me, but I don't have $400 to spend on a knife. I bought a knife 10 years ago that was homemade by a mountain man in Alaska. I stopped by his house on my way to the Arctic Cirle. There was a handmade sign on the road that said "Homemade knives this way -->" So I went over and bought a fine knife that I have skinned deer with ever since. It's beautiful and was less than half the price of one of these. I love my knife and I have a great story to pass on to my children about the knife.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Ishawooa: My sympathies to your wife! Got two sets of Chicago Cutlery kitchen knives for my first wedding. I have seen toilet paper that was sharper and held a blade better than those things. Ugh!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

RJ,
I believe Diamond Blade has various handle material options to selec from

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

WAM,
Think you answered the question when you indicated you wouldn't mind throwing away 17 Cold Steel Pendleton knives. Just joking. Have a couple of fine knives made by Lloyd Pendleton is he part of Cold Steel?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I simply don't need a hunting knife so good that I would spend that kind of money on one. I don't place my blades in a vise and bend them 180 degrees and back.
Ditto for rifle scopes costing $1,000 and more.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gavin McNaughton wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I'd rather go with a cold steel mini ak-47 knife its wicked sharp great blade point and handle, they also have a smaller mini ak-47 knife which I have and use alot for haybailler twine, opening boxes, mail, and a easy but not as a safe alternative to our cutlery shears.Id also recomend buying cold steel knifes off of a online tactical distributer for cheaper price!!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hermit crab wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I appreciate the quality and craftsmanship associated with the knife, but I'm not sure I'd like a knife that I don't need to resharpen. Touching up my broadheads and hunting knife are one of the things I really appreciate about hunting.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Have been Lucy enough to own and use hard many fine custom knives. My Diamond Blade is at the top of the list

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Mean to write lucky instead of Lucy. Freudian slip?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

My wife always has room for another pair of shoes and a Coach purse to match her latest business outfit and that costs alot more than a Diamond Blade. Time for a roadtrip to Cabela's with some of the boys.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

To OlKrusty: Go to diamondbladeknives.com.

To Amflyer: On those rare occasions when a DB does need a touchup, I use a CrockStick. The odd thing is, that despite the hard edge, it touches up easily. Or you can send it back to Diamond Blade and they'll do it for you.

To Rocky Squirrel: Tragically, I don't keep records of anything for more than a month or so after the article appears. I can, however, tell you from memory that two of the best edge holders I've tested in the past few years are the Wayne Fears knives from American tool and the handmade knives from Mike Malosh.

To Happy Myles: Freud said that sometimes a cigar is only a cigar. Don't worry about it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 2Poppa wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Like you Dave I prefer a "slightly shorter, wider blade with a bit more belly", to get the job done.
This beauty has to be one of the new ones I'll purchase this year.
I like the hole in the handle where I tie a piece of leather for a better grasp.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Just one question Dave how easy is it to resharpen? Like guns need to be reloaded. Any knife will need to be resharpened. Correctly sharpening a knife has been a popular post for some on this site.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

After reading the literature which came with my Diamondblade I decided sending it back to the factory for sharpening would be the best thing.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

To Carl Huber: I don't know what you'd have to do to one to actually dull it, so sharpening becomes a question of taking it back to razor sharp from merely sharp. For that I use a Crock Stick, and it's very easy.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Blue Ox wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Ka Bar makes one of their USMC knives (model 1282) out of D2, for just over a hundred bucks. The only drawback (for me anyway) is the blade is semi serrated.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Dave; Thanks for the call back and advice!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bwana Hunter wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Hey David: I see that you've given the nod to a super fine knife with a blade guard. Old habits and hunches die hard, but with this important must have inclusion of mine for a new blade - I'm in..!

Best/Bwana

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Great posts lately guys. Now if I could just get my hands on an M-14, Luger .45, or Diamond Blade knife. The knife is looking like my best bet. I take my old Buck Zipper to the local Bass Pro shop every year for a free sharpening but it has never really impressed me. I can't complain though, I drive a Chevy Silverado not a Lamborghini.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Probably is a great knife in every way but simply has the appearance of one of my wife's Chicago Cutlery kitchen knifes.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RJ Arena wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

@ Ishawooa,
Funny that you said this, I was thinking the same thing when I first saw this knife! I also think the blade should be wider.I like the toughness and sure-grip of the handle, but at this price point I would like to see some nice wood, Cocobolo, Bolivian Rosewood or maybe Snakewood.
again there is that price, I like all of my knives, and while in the field there is nothing better than always picking up a sharp knife, sharpening my knives has brought me pleasure,bringing an edge back and honing it, much more fun than cleaning my guns!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

BlueOx; Sorry, but I can't imagine trying to use a 7" blade combat knife for hunting. Unless maybe someone is gutting an elephant.

I really like the shape of that knife but I could never justify paying that much money for one. Give one of those away for a photo labeling contest and I guarantee I'll be screwing my thinking cap on pretty tight to win it!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I trust Dave's faith in these knives,but for now the $$ is too steep for my taste!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Douglas wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Great looking knife! Yet my old case will do me for the 20 years or so I have left.
I guess I could get one to leave to my grandsons and start some kind of family fight when I'm gone.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Steve in Virginia wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

I like it, although I generally prefer an all purpose hunting knife that has a tip with a slightly sharper angle (makes field dressing on certain parts of animal a tad easier).

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

As for knife sharpening I do a great job but I keep hearing differnt opinions in regard to degree of angle. I've always shapened fillets at 19-20 degree for extra sharpness but less durability and kitchen and hunting knives at 23-25 degree for sharpness but more durability. I have been told I'm wrong. I don't think so, any thoughts?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dale freeman wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Dave,
I sure would like to make a hunt with you sometime.
I like a man that is honest and straight foreward and is what he is.
Thank you for being a real American.
They're geting scarce as hen's teeth.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dale freeman wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Dave,
I sure would like to make a hunt with you sometime.
I like a man that is honest and straight foreward and is what he is.
Thank you for being a real American.
They're geting scarce as hen's teeth.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dale freeman wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Dave;
I sure would like to make a hunt with you sometime.
I like a man that is straight foreward and honest, a man that is what he is.
Thanks for being a real American.
They're getting short as hen's teeth.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from dale freeman wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

sorry about the three post.
The web site is getting no better.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gavin McNaughton wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

Do you ever use collective intelligence for your topics and other discustional writings @Field and Stream?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gavin McNaughton wrote 1 year 4 weeks ago

might check out SOG knifes to test, heard there pretty good but i never ownned one! I do belive that cold steel are one of the leaders but not sure as in what ranking they have but they do give you knife and sword proof on their dvds and even advertise inferno pepperspray,and big bore blowguns.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beagl1 wrote 1 year 3 weeks ago

The blade of Meridian has the same shape as my Remington Hunter marked RH made in USA 51.
Eviscerated a doe last fall with it, OO buck & a 50 year old semi.
The old crap still does the job.vjcfe

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hornd wrote 1 year 2 weeks ago

I have been heartbroken by loosing several decent knives. I pulled a towel out of my pocket fishing and sent one to the bottom this summer. I now carry $10 Kershaws. They get the job done and if I lose it, I get another out of the drawer. Also many many many knives have been left behind after gutting a deer. Saftey Orange knives and flashlights are harder to lose. I'm surprised nobody has mentioned Ceramic knives which are harder than D2. I never had a Boker or Timberline, but we do have them for kitchen knives.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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