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Vintage Tackle Contest: Borgen Weedless Casting Spoon

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August 16, 2012

Vintage Tackle Contest: Borgen Weedless Casting Spoon

By Joe Cermele

This week's winner in our vintage tackle contest was submitted by Garrett Wood. Garrett acquired this spring-loaded spoon from a friend's dad who was looking to get rid of some old gear. Garrett writes that, "as soon as I saw this thing I was intimidated. This beast of a lure is pretty gnarly looking and acting in the water." But does it have a pretty gnarly price tag? Dr. Todd Larson of the The Whitefish Press and "Fishing For History" blog has the score.

Dr. Todd says:

"Ah, to build a better mouse trap…spring loaded hooks and lures have been around since the dawn of American fishing (seven of the first ten fishing tackle patents issued in this country were for spring loaded hooks). The object, of course, is to make sure you hook every fish that hits your lure. You have a simple yet effective lure called the Borgen Weedless Casting Spoon, patented on 20 April 1954 by Leif I. Borgen of Chicago, Ill. It came in several configurations; yours is the earlier one resembling closest the patent images. It's a cool and interesting lure worth around $20-$30 in today's market. To see the patent for this lure, click here."

Sweet lure, Garrett...but I'd watch my fingers when handling that thing. It's kind of a like a grenade and I could totally see myself accidentaly opening it in my hand. Thanks for sending, and enjoy the Berkley Digital Tournament Scale that's headed your way.

If you've already sent me photos of your vintage tackle, keep checking every Thursday to see if I chose it for an appraisal by Dr. Todd. If you haven't and want to enter the contest, email photos of your old tackle to fstackle@gmail.com, along with your name, mailing address, and story of how you acquired the gear. If I use it in a Thursday post, you get a Berkley Digital Tournament Scale (left, $40).

Comments (4)

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from buckhunter wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

Have never seen a lure with two hinged plates like this. I assume the hook protrudes through the slots and hook the fish.

I am willing to bet there is a fortune to be made just by regurgitating these old ideas and putting them on the market. Fisherman love gimmicks and there are thousands of ideas lost years ago which could be reinvented.

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from time2be wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

I have seen some old lures which I got when I was a very young fisherman go away and return in the last couple of years.

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from whitefishpress wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

@buckhunter So funny you mentioned that. I have two thoughts on that. First, I met a guy at a recent Bassmaster Classic Expo who was touting a "revolutionary new rod" he had invented where the line ran down the hollow center of the rod. I had literally just taken possession of a manuscript on the history of steel casting rods and was carrying in my brief case the 1880s patent for this very invention. Second, many past ideas could very well work better in today's world, with cheaper manufacturing and a greater array of materials available. But it is expensive. A gentleman I'm going to interview contacted me several years ago about bringing the old P&K Minno Saver hook back into production. I helped him the best I could, which was not much, and this year he is selling them, having brought it back into production. It took three years and a whole lot of money...but it IS a great hook.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

I had to Google the P&K Minnow Saver to see what it was. Very interesting. I bet time has killed many good lures and gadgets over the years.

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from whitefishpress wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

@buckhunter So funny you mentioned that. I have two thoughts on that. First, I met a guy at a recent Bassmaster Classic Expo who was touting a "revolutionary new rod" he had invented where the line ran down the hollow center of the rod. I had literally just taken possession of a manuscript on the history of steel casting rods and was carrying in my brief case the 1880s patent for this very invention. Second, many past ideas could very well work better in today's world, with cheaper manufacturing and a greater array of materials available. But it is expensive. A gentleman I'm going to interview contacted me several years ago about bringing the old P&K Minno Saver hook back into production. I helped him the best I could, which was not much, and this year he is selling them, having brought it back into production. It took three years and a whole lot of money...but it IS a great hook.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

Have never seen a lure with two hinged plates like this. I assume the hook protrudes through the slots and hook the fish.

I am willing to bet there is a fortune to be made just by regurgitating these old ideas and putting them on the market. Fisherman love gimmicks and there are thousands of ideas lost years ago which could be reinvented.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from time2be wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

I have seen some old lures which I got when I was a very young fisherman go away and return in the last couple of years.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 1 year 34 weeks ago

I had to Google the P&K Minnow Saver to see what it was. Very interesting. I bet time has killed many good lures and gadgets over the years.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment