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Knight Rifles Goes Under

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June 02, 2009

Knight Rifles Goes Under

By Dave Hurteau

From Shooting Illustrated Guns and Hunting:

During the recent NRA Annual Meetings, Americanrifleman.org/Americanhunter.org learned that Knight Rifles is closing its doors after 24 years as a key American firearms manufacturer. That news was confirmed late last week via an announcement from Modern Muzzleloading, Inc., a related subsidiary under corporate parent, Pradco Outdoor Brands/EBSCO. The press release stated, “The decision to close the Knight operation resulted from an overall industry downturn.” Reportedly Knight sales had declined sharply in recent years and efforts to sell the brand and company assets were unsuccessful.

Comments (25)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Douglas wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

It used to be that muzzle loader shooting was an inexpensive way to burn powder and sling lead balls at targets.
Then came the ever more complex "in lines" with resulting run ups of ammo and propellant prices. It does not surprise me that rifle manufacturers are unable to keep up with the fads. Though I enjoy shooting my in line, it is the most expensive gun I have in price per shot. I plan to get back to basics with a side (or Flint) lock and self cast projectiles.
Just like our grandpappys used to do.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hunter Savage wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

while i personally despise in lines . i think its sucks that the company is going under , hopefully it will stop with them .

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Armchair Mike wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

How do you think this will affect the prices in existing dealer stock? Will there be a run-up, or could a fellow pick one up on the cheap?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

If I'm not mistaken Knight was the first to offer the in-line. It's a shame they could not compete but if you've ever seen any of the Knight commercials you'll understand why they couldn't sell their rifles. My guess is T/C will pick up their market share.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

In-lines are great! I saw a beautiful A&H last month for dirt cheap, and I'd have bought it but for the fact that I already have a Savage.

Some of the old Pennsylvania rifles look nice but the hypercurved stock and brass butt-plate are annoying.

Frontloaders will always be a niche market with two niches. The in-lines and the sidelocks. I don't know why anyone considering an in-line now would buy anything other than a Savage.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jjas wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

Shooters decided that CVA and TC (among a few others) offered what they wanted at a price they wanted to pay and Knight couldn't seem to sway customers their way anymore.

It happens.

Jim

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jay wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I purchased a Knight BK-92 back in the early nineties. The most inaccurate gun I have ever shot. Its to bad folks are loosing their jobs but my experience with their product has been absolutely dreadful.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

Mr. Knight had already sold Knight Rifles to the holding company several years back. Perhaps he say the writing on the wall. Their products were high priced and were out positioned by brands that are just as effective and cost less.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

To buckhunter: You are right Mr. Knight re-"introduced" the in-line rifle. Which for the record are OLDER than flint or cap rifles.
jjas is also right, T/C,CVA gave "the people" what they wanted for a price they were willing to pay(i.e T/C Pro Hunter).
Sorry to hear this none-theless.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I got my eye on the Savage 10ML-II, YABUDDY!

I’m tired of the whiteouts and breathing in all that smoke!

What has Knight been doing all this time? I’ve watched numerous of companies deliberately hold back there advancement because that’s the way they always done it and they all folded up!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Walt Smith wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

Too bad for the workers and their families, but a inline is not a primitive firearm and shouldn't be allowed for use in primitive seasons. With more states adopting this reality this might be a sign of things to come.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

Sold my Knight. Never could get the dang thing to shoot well. Ammo like shooting dollar bills down range.

My pennsylvania flintlock longrifle is much cheaper and more fun to shoot.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from hoveysmith wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

Knight was an innovative company that introduced a number of ground-breaking in-line designs. I hunted with their rifles in North America and Africa with success, although my most recent African trip was with a Traditions .50-caliber double. I have always shot everyone's guns, including those made by many other companies that are now no more. If you have Knights that used the plastic 209 Disc or Red Hot primer holders, you had best stock up now. The guns cannot be shot without them. The same may be said for H&R's reintroduced Huntsman that was discontinued a year ago. They also need a plastic do-dad to work. H&R is now owned by Remington, but still marketed as a seperate brand.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

Big O,

I have a question on the inline being invented previous to the flintlock. I am very familiar with it being a contemporary of the side lock percussion, particularly in France. I am also familiar with the wheellock, Snaphaunce (early flint design with a seperate frizzen) and the matchlock. I am most intrested to learn of this pre-flint lock inline! Please share!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

Del,

Give me a flintlock, real blackpowder and a patched round ball any time!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

To Beekeeper: Heard on the History Channel. Said the Chinese developed "first firearms" and they were "in-line" style. I'm currently looking for show name to let you know. Sorry did'nt have info available at this time.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

FOUND IT ! "THE HISTORY OF THE GUN"

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FloridaHunter1226 wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

Guess they could not compete with the popular T/C company. Don't think I have ever seen any advertising for them, maybe that's why they went under... I don't even think that many people knew about them.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ziggy4334 wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

Oh well, my Bighorn stays where it is, for now. I'd like to have a shotgun but the gun is worth more than it's worth now on the market, so I'll be happy to have it for five days next season.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Toby Bridges wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

Hovey Smith mentioned that those who shoot a Knight that uses a plastic primer carier should consider "stocking up". He's right...things often disasppearing shortly after a company goes under. Another alternative would be to buy one of the "Non Full Plastic Jacket" conversions. I have them in the three DISC Extreme models I shoot (one now with close to 6,000 rounds through it), and they work wonderfully - allowing the rifles to be primed with a bare No. 209 primer. And the conversion also helps keep a lot of the fouling out of the receiver.

And to chime in on a few other comments...Samuel Pauley received a patent for the first percussion in-line muzzleloader in 1812.

Toby Bridges

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BigWoodsHunter57 wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

Very sad news

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from sheriger wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Actually, the inline isn't some modern invention, and the inline action does qualify as "primitive." The percussion inline was introduced in the 1880s. Tony Knight simply took an already-existing idea and applied modern technology to it. It never really caught on because the cartridge gun was taking over at the time, and the percussion muzzleloader was on its way out. the

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from kingmn64 wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

I own a Knight Shadow a very simple reliable gun that I have consistently shot 1-1 1/2 inch groups at 100 yards. I am very sad to hear that they are going under but it looks like they are still planning on making accessories so those that need the plastic 209 primers might not be out of luck.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from kingmn64 wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

Also on a side note for slug gun only states it is cheaper in my opinion to get an accurate muzzleloader than it is a shotgun that shoots slugs. I don't have to worry about changing out barrels and I also enjoy the challenge of one shot hunting.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deadly wrote 4 years 25 weeks ago

I own a KP-1 in .45-70 that shoots 3 shots at 100 yds with all holes touching (from a rest with LeveRevolution ammo). I hunt with this rifle in LA's "primitive" weapons seasons and would not part with it for anything.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from Del in KS wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

Sold my Knight. Never could get the dang thing to shoot well. Ammo like shooting dollar bills down range.

My pennsylvania flintlock longrifle is much cheaper and more fun to shoot.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

Mr. Knight had already sold Knight Rifles to the holding company several years back. Perhaps he say the writing on the wall. Their products were high priced and were out positioned by brands that are just as effective and cost less.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Douglas wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

It used to be that muzzle loader shooting was an inexpensive way to burn powder and sling lead balls at targets.
Then came the ever more complex "in lines" with resulting run ups of ammo and propellant prices. It does not surprise me that rifle manufacturers are unable to keep up with the fads. Though I enjoy shooting my in line, it is the most expensive gun I have in price per shot. I plan to get back to basics with a side (or Flint) lock and self cast projectiles.
Just like our grandpappys used to do.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hunter Savage wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

while i personally despise in lines . i think its sucks that the company is going under , hopefully it will stop with them .

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

If I'm not mistaken Knight was the first to offer the in-line. It's a shame they could not compete but if you've ever seen any of the Knight commercials you'll understand why they couldn't sell their rifles. My guess is T/C will pick up their market share.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jjas wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

Shooters decided that CVA and TC (among a few others) offered what they wanted at a price they wanted to pay and Knight couldn't seem to sway customers their way anymore.

It happens.

Jim

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

To buckhunter: You are right Mr. Knight re-"introduced" the in-line rifle. Which for the record are OLDER than flint or cap rifles.
jjas is also right, T/C,CVA gave "the people" what they wanted for a price they were willing to pay(i.e T/C Pro Hunter).
Sorry to hear this none-theless.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Walt Smith wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

Too bad for the workers and their families, but a inline is not a primitive firearm and shouldn't be allowed for use in primitive seasons. With more states adopting this reality this might be a sign of things to come.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

Del,

Give me a flintlock, real blackpowder and a patched round ball any time!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Armchair Mike wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

How do you think this will affect the prices in existing dealer stock? Will there be a run-up, or could a fellow pick one up on the cheap?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mike Diehl wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

In-lines are great! I saw a beautiful A&H last month for dirt cheap, and I'd have bought it but for the fact that I already have a Savage.

Some of the old Pennsylvania rifles look nice but the hypercurved stock and brass butt-plate are annoying.

Frontloaders will always be a niche market with two niches. The in-lines and the sidelocks. I don't know why anyone considering an in-line now would buy anything other than a Savage.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I got my eye on the Savage 10ML-II, YABUDDY!

I’m tired of the whiteouts and breathing in all that smoke!

What has Knight been doing all this time? I’ve watched numerous of companies deliberately hold back there advancement because that’s the way they always done it and they all folded up!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hoveysmith wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

Knight was an innovative company that introduced a number of ground-breaking in-line designs. I hunted with their rifles in North America and Africa with success, although my most recent African trip was with a Traditions .50-caliber double. I have always shot everyone's guns, including those made by many other companies that are now no more. If you have Knights that used the plastic 209 Disc or Red Hot primer holders, you had best stock up now. The guns cannot be shot without them. The same may be said for H&R's reintroduced Huntsman that was discontinued a year ago. They also need a plastic do-dad to work. H&R is now owned by Remington, but still marketed as a seperate brand.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

Big O,

I have a question on the inline being invented previous to the flintlock. I am very familiar with it being a contemporary of the side lock percussion, particularly in France. I am also familiar with the wheellock, Snaphaunce (early flint design with a seperate frizzen) and the matchlock. I am most intrested to learn of this pre-flint lock inline! Please share!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

To Beekeeper: Heard on the History Channel. Said the Chinese developed "first firearms" and they were "in-line" style. I'm currently looking for show name to let you know. Sorry did'nt have info available at this time.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

FOUND IT ! "THE HISTORY OF THE GUN"

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FloridaHunter1226 wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

Guess they could not compete with the popular T/C company. Don't think I have ever seen any advertising for them, maybe that's why they went under... I don't even think that many people knew about them.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ziggy4334 wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

Oh well, my Bighorn stays where it is, for now. I'd like to have a shotgun but the gun is worth more than it's worth now on the market, so I'll be happy to have it for five days next season.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Toby Bridges wrote 4 years 45 weeks ago

Hovey Smith mentioned that those who shoot a Knight that uses a plastic primer carier should consider "stocking up". He's right...things often disasppearing shortly after a company goes under. Another alternative would be to buy one of the "Non Full Plastic Jacket" conversions. I have them in the three DISC Extreme models I shoot (one now with close to 6,000 rounds through it), and they work wonderfully - allowing the rifles to be primed with a bare No. 209 primer. And the conversion also helps keep a lot of the fouling out of the receiver.

And to chime in on a few other comments...Samuel Pauley received a patent for the first percussion in-line muzzleloader in 1812.

Toby Bridges

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BigWoodsHunter57 wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

Very sad news

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from sheriger wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

Actually, the inline isn't some modern invention, and the inline action does qualify as "primitive." The percussion inline was introduced in the 1880s. Tony Knight simply took an already-existing idea and applied modern technology to it. It never really caught on because the cartridge gun was taking over at the time, and the percussion muzzleloader was on its way out. the

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from kingmn64 wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

I own a Knight Shadow a very simple reliable gun that I have consistently shot 1-1 1/2 inch groups at 100 yards. I am very sad to hear that they are going under but it looks like they are still planning on making accessories so those that need the plastic 209 primers might not be out of luck.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from kingmn64 wrote 4 years 28 weeks ago

Also on a side note for slug gun only states it is cheaper in my opinion to get an accurate muzzleloader than it is a shotgun that shoots slugs. I don't have to worry about changing out barrels and I also enjoy the challenge of one shot hunting.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from jay wrote 4 years 46 weeks ago

I purchased a Knight BK-92 back in the early nineties. The most inaccurate gun I have ever shot. Its to bad folks are loosing their jobs but my experience with their product has been absolutely dreadful.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from deadly wrote 4 years 25 weeks ago

I own a KP-1 in .45-70 that shoots 3 shots at 100 yds with all holes touching (from a rest with LeveRevolution ammo). I hunt with this rifle in LA's "primitive" weapons seasons and would not part with it for anything.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment