Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

The Best Meat for Venison Jerky (and How to Slice It)

Recent Comments

Categories

Recent Posts

Archives

Syndicate

Google Reader or Homepage
Add to My Yahoo!
Add to My AOL

Whitetail 365
in your Inbox

Enter your email address to get our new post everyday.

December 01, 2009

The Best Meat for Venison Jerky (and How to Slice It)

By Hank Shaw

A venison preparation tip from Hank Shaw, author of the award-winning food blog Hunter Angler Gardener Cook

Nearly every part of the deer can be made into jerky, but the best cuts are the eye round and rump roast from the hind legs. Any large roast from the hind leg will do. Why? Big cuts mean larger pieces of jerky, and these roasts have most of their muscle fibers running in the same direction. This is important.

To our mind, the best jerky is pliable yet chewy—and doesn’t make you gnaw on dried muscle fibers longer than your hand. That means cutting against the grain of the meat, in 1/8-inch-thich slices. Don’t cut too thin or the venison will dry out like a shingle on your roof. The best way to get this cut every time is to partially freeze the meat: A large roast will need 90 minutes to 2 hours in the chiller before cutting.

Comments (5)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Big O wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Thanks for the 411 !
Off to get some more jerky fixins !

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RichardF wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

I freeze my roast after the kill. When I want to make jerkey I thaw out a roast for about 16-20 hours, then slice it and season it. When the desired 24 hours of seasoning is done it is fully thawed and ready for the dehydrator.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ray cummings wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

No need to freeze it. Just use an electric meat slicer. They are inexpensive and do a great job on venison or beef. All slices are uniform and the job goes much faster than using a knife. I also cut mine a little thicker (1/4 inch). It only takes about 3 hours at 125 degrees in my smoker to get great tasting jerky. Since you used fresh, not frozen, meat the jerky can be frozen for later use.
If you want a great recipe for marinade, email me at rgsporting@hotmail.com

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BeardogRed wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Thanks for the tip on freezing first,I have not thought of that.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Casey Walker wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

I have started slicing up my jerky meat on a meat slicer as I am processing the rest of my deer. This way the small ends of the roast that I cant run throught the slicer go into the burger tub for salami. I freeze it in 5 pound bags and then when ever I need a more I just thaw, season and dehydrate, I have got my recipe to the point that my wife has is encouraging me to fill an extra doe tag just so we have enough jerky meat for our summer camping and fishing trips.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from ray cummings wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

No need to freeze it. Just use an electric meat slicer. They are inexpensive and do a great job on venison or beef. All slices are uniform and the job goes much faster than using a knife. I also cut mine a little thicker (1/4 inch). It only takes about 3 hours at 125 degrees in my smoker to get great tasting jerky. Since you used fresh, not frozen, meat the jerky can be frozen for later use.
If you want a great recipe for marinade, email me at rgsporting@hotmail.com

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Thanks for the 411 !
Off to get some more jerky fixins !

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RichardF wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

I freeze my roast after the kill. When I want to make jerkey I thaw out a roast for about 16-20 hours, then slice it and season it. When the desired 24 hours of seasoning is done it is fully thawed and ready for the dehydrator.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from BeardogRed wrote 4 years 19 weeks ago

Thanks for the tip on freezing first,I have not thought of that.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Casey Walker wrote 4 years 11 weeks ago

I have started slicing up my jerky meat on a meat slicer as I am processing the rest of my deer. This way the small ends of the roast that I cant run throught the slicer go into the burger tub for salami. I freeze it in 5 pound bags and then when ever I need a more I just thaw, season and dehydrate, I have got my recipe to the point that my wife has is encouraging me to fill an extra doe tag just so we have enough jerky meat for our summer camping and fishing trips.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment