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Bourjaily: Golfing With A Shotgun

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July 21, 2009

Bourjaily: Golfing With A Shotgun

By Phil Bourjaily

With the exception of John Daly’s pants (below), I have no problem with golf, but I stay as far away from it as possible. My fear is, if I ever tried it, I might really, really like it. Then I would have two time-consuming, expensive hobbies instead of just the one that I get to call “work.”

Nevertheless, it has long been my contention that good shooters make good golfers, and vice versa. Golf and shotgun shooting require almost the same skills of eye to hand coordination, focus, and ability to think only of the next shot. As an experiement, I read Dr. Joe Parent’s Zen Putting recently, imagining the word “shotgun” wherever I read “putter” and almost everything in the book applied perfectly to target shooting, and sometimes even to hunting. I found the book fascinating and helpful and I recommend it, whether you are a shooter or a golfer. You can get it for $22.50 at zengolf.com.

It turns out Dr. Parent even coached a trapshooter by phone for a couple of years, a woman from Ohio named Sally Telfer who had stumbled upon Zen Golf, one of his earlier books. Although Parent knows nothing about shooting, he helped Telfer so much with her mental game that she was able to break her first 200 straight. “It was at the Ohio State Shoot,” she told me. ”It was windy and everyone was complaining about the targets but I didn’t notice they were hard. I was in the zone and never wanted the shoot to end.”

If shooting and golf are as similar as I think they are, then there must be some scratch golfers out there among you Gun Nuts. Anyone care to fess up?

Comments (39)

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from uplander12 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

the only scratch in my golf game is when i scratch my head after I 4 putt for the 7th hole in a row.

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from seadog wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

The time & money needed to play golf would interfere with my other activities. I'd rather hunt, fish or scuba dive. That doesn't leave a lot of time for golf. If I could quit work, then maybe ...
P.S. I have tried it & I'm pretty much right there with uplander on the scratchin.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

First off I can't believe I actually got onto the site. For the past month or so when I click on all I get is waiting on F&S... It just sits and spins...

I handle a shotgun pretty well. In golf I have no idea where a drive is going. I do put decently so I reserve my golfing outings to the ocassional round of Putt-Putt!

Maybe golf can come up with a designated "putter" rule...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from dneaster3 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I'm no scratch golfer, but I do split time between the gun range and the golf course and can attest that your observation is spot on. The similarities between the two are remarkable. Some that jump to mind are
* Hand-eye coordination
* Muscle memory
* Psuedo athleticism
* Business/networking opportunities
* Family-friendly
* Time/Money/Investment involved in playing
* Great metaphors for teaching life

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from micropterus wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

After working 40 hours a week, I go to my additional part time job working at a driving range. Since I work there I get to hit balls for free and I usually end up debating on spending the extra cash on a round of golf or a hundred rounds of ammo. I'm not that bad at golf, I have about a 15 handicap which isn't great, but I can usually shoot in the low 90's and occasionally the 80's. Oddly enough I suck at shooting anything that is moving. Go figure.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I broke 80 one time... a 40 on the front and a 39 on the back. Never made a hole in one but was 2" short. Story of my life. That was a lot of kids and pounds ago when golfing meant walking instead of riding and drinking. I went from golfing every week to a couple of times a year but still seem to shoot in the 80's or low 90's. John Daly just wore those pants in case he lost his cookies after last night's binge and no one would notice. Worked rather well. Poor Watson I almost cried on the 18th when he didn't put it away. Geezers never win any more, but boy was I proud. 59 and kicking! Tiger what??? Didn't even make the cut? Are you sure about that?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckstopper wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

One of my most memorable days in Stuttgart was duck hunting in the morning and golfing in the afternoon.
However, golfs don't do well in gumbo, neither do skeets.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from KJ wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Balance, tempo, focus, and the ability to put a bad shot behind you are necessary for either activity. However, the muscle memory required to do well in one is very different from the other. I don't have time to do either often enough to be really very good, but I enjoy both.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from streack wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Back when I played college golf I was scratch, but after two years I decided that my studies were more important than playing on the team. I still play a good game shooting mostly in the mid to high 70's. In golf and shotgunning I think the most important thing is being able to subconsciously react to different situations. It is very hard to tell yourself how to properly hit a golfball when you are telling yourself what to or not to do while swinging; in shotgunning this would be like sighting down the barrel while trying to shoot a crosser. Over time you can hone your skills so you can hit a golfball and shoot a shotgun without having to think about what your doing. Phil, I have never though of the correlation between golf and shotguns, but now that you mention it; they have more in common than one would imagine.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from jbird wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

If it's nice enough to golf, it's nice enough to fish. And I don't fish NEARLY as much as I'd like to. Can see how it could be similar to shotgunning though.

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I have only been into golf for the last couple of years, so there is no need to throw my score under bus...but I find fishing, in the casting effort, to be more akin to golf. Shotgun shooting to me takes less concentration to me then golfing, but I grew up shooting shotguns at around 12, and rifle shooting at 16, so at around 45ish taking up golf I am a baby to the sport!

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from RileyDog13 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

My free time is split fairly evenly between golf shooting, and poker. Earlier posts noted the universal need to put past dissapointments behind and focus on the next task. But that is universally valuable -in poker, marriage, and all else. Shooting and golfing skills are VERY different -Streccks comments are closest to my own thoughts -in the range of flexibility (or judgement or reaction)available during the underlying process -DURING the swing, shot, or hand. I'd put shooting directly between golf and poker on the pre-plan/execute within the rules and adjust/react continuum. But I am a hunter and shots are unpredictable, no muscle memory. Perhaps muscle memory is possible within the smaller shot range of trap shooting which places it closer to the plan/execution requirement of golf.

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from Tim Platt wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Poker? If I had every dime I ever spent on guns, golf and poker...

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from RileyDog13 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Worthwhile distinction to be made between putting and full swing. Putting is like driving -simple line and speed -no greater level of concentration, motor skills, or sobriety required. 5-irons, dove shoots, and cash games, however, require more of us. Citizenship always in the lead, a BAC of .06 is the responsible maximum and minimum to observe.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

When I was in high school I lived on a golf course. My grandfather was an amateur golf champ that taught me the game. I had a five or seven handicap at that time blundering around bull-like. If I went up against real good golfers I would get my ass kicked. Departed golf due costs, and I’d rather shoot clay targets. So I know both sports….

Seriously, folks. It takes much more work to be a good golfer than a good wing shot. A self-taught wing shot can blunder bull-like into the upper shooting classes. You can’t do that in golf.

To be any good at golf means lessons from a pro, time playing, and some reflective thought.

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from cliff68 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Every time I see a golf course I see a wasted rifle range or motocross track.

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from dwaynez wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I play a few rounds a year, it gives me a chance to get together with some college friends, but after we lose most of our balls in the trees and water we pack up and go fishing.

We make a weekend of it and after getting ticked off at the golf course and our inability to really play well we have a few drinks, catch some fish, and share some laughs.

Oh and no one in our group wears daly pants, LOL!

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from ranger2 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I came from a golfing family... as a matter of fact, I have a second cousin that owns and operated a course in Scottsdale Az, and some of the big-timers in the family made their fortunes designing and developing golf courses and associated communities- from Denver to the Bahamas... my dad was not party to any of this and had a well developed disdain for the frivolity of the sport... so I grew up in Idaho, poverty stricken and devoid of the knowledge of golf... but we shot 12 gauge shells like they were going out of style- in every application available.
In college, I minored in physical education, and thus was introduced to golf- by way of the archery class it was coupled with (they are paired all of the time because they are both target sports...had not thought of that prior to the class...). I went on to be an assistant teacher for the class for a couple of semesters because I had a better knack for teaching archery than the Professor (one of my favorite instructors as well, and a friend still)... so I golfed a little more frequently, and was fairly successful, for a beginner.
Having studied a lot of kinesiology and motor development, I agree with the comments by dneaster3. Archery, golf, and shot gunning share a lot of traits both on the mental and physiological aspects, and I agree that mastering any of them will aid in proficiency for all of them.
My big two rules for golf are not common though, I will:
A.) NEVER keep score- it screws up your focus
B.) NEVER golf with people who are O.C.D. about golf (or wear psychedelic britches)

And every once in a while, I put all of my clubs (that I bought at Goodwill for $20) in the nylon bag that holds my collapsible camp chair and take it to the range... It sure draws some stares! But hey, you can’t waste being a redneck on just your hunting buddies!

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from ranger2 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I once had an epiphany while out shooting skeet. I had a bunch of old crappy range balls in the back of my rig, so I thought I would shoot a few of them to see if they made good targets- the effects were somewhat anticlimactic- they just bounced around on the ground a little and did not even open up- not even when hit with a .30 cal rifle. So I picked up a spent 12 gauge shell and set it on a post- golf ball balanced on top, and shot it off the shell from about 10 feet… better results. I moved in to basically point blank range, and blew the center out of the ball, and sent it a long ways down range- this turned into setting up a ball on a spent 3” shell, with a ball atop a spent 2 ¾ shell about an inch and a half behind it. If you line the muzzle of your shotgun up in a horizontal plane about 10 inches behind the rear ball and fire, the rear ball (and load of shot) strikes the front ball with such force as to generate a 600+ yard drive. The ball that is shot directly is blown to smithereens in the process, but it is a hell of a lot of fun! Thus, Shotgun Golf was born.
I am sure there are many that may question the intelligence of such activities, and those thoughts did cross my mind… but if you don’t live life on the edge, you are taking up too much room! And by the way, don’t try this at home!

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from FloridaHunter1226 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I just started golfing and with some lessons, I qould qualify myself as somewhat good... atleast that is what some of my friends tell me but then again, they are not such great golfers themselves. So maybe I am just the best of the worse. haha. But I will admit that I am into golf and it does have a lot to do with shooting. Including the need to relax and only think about the next target.

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from Bella wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I'm with cliff68, golf is a waste of pasture! Golf courses are monocrops of grass that need chemicals and far far too much water, effecting aquifers and harming the ecosystem, all so fools in loud pants can waste time on a summers day. A body can waste time on a summers day without having to waylay quite so many resources, far better go go fishin or fling a few shafts (or rounds) downrange. I have no love for any pro sport involving spherical objects (without powder that is..) anyway. I tend to think people who work should get paid for it and people who play should not. But the wold has been turned upside down so many times already that who knows which way is up anyway.

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from duff wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

My wife is an LPGA pro. She loves shooting and is a natural. I think one of her most effective qualities/skills is as KJ mentioned, the ability to focus and put a bad shot away(not forget it, but niether let it affect the next). She also has that ability to listen to a coach authentically and employ the advice, and she can watch a pro, then do the same herself. Those traits make her a good golfer as well as a good shot, and anyone with both that mental discipline and athletic ability can do the same.
She agrees with many of the posts that the flow and tempo of shooting and golf share many similarities. I played pro hockey, and there's a saying that hockey players make good golfers. I think it's mostly true although there are fewer similarities in game fundamentals. It may just be the swing and the shot...at least that's what Happy Gilmore would say.
One combination of golf and shooting that I've had the occasion to think about would be the addition of a shotgun to my golf bag on those days and courses when either Canada Geese or seagulls are more prevalent than grass.
Thanks.

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from Tonahutu wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

You can also buy Zen Putting on Amazon for $15.30. Why pay more?

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from nelsol wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Yep, been playing golf since I was 4. Carried a scratch handicap for several years, but time catches up. I'm just trying to keep it under 10 for as long as I can.

I've never associated golf with shotgunning, but rather rifle and pistol shooting. In my case, they help each other. Being able to place a bullet precisely where you want it, and being able to hit a golf ball exactly where you want it to go---which ultimately is in the hole, to me mirror each other. Like the late Harvey Penick (golf teaching professional and author of the Little Red Book)always said, "Take Dead Aim".

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

If they would have tournaments just for putting I would do ok. But I can't get a ball to fly straight, I guess being lrft handed eith a dominate right eye does not help?

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from steve182 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I have too many expensive and all consuming hobbies, Golf and Hunting being two of them. Every year during our "Cast and Blast" week we inckude at least one round of golf. suprisingly there is an excellent golf course 15 minutes from camp. I agree with the post above that Golf teaches great life skills, like hunting and shooting does. Takes great coordination and concentration, and you must forget the last shot and think only of the next. I'm no Scratch golfer, but when i'm on i shoot repectably in the 80's. Tough but great game. i will have to check out that book.

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from wingshooter54 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Sporting clays has often been referred to as "golf with a shotgun" The main difference being I have never seen a shooter think about wrapping a $2500 shotgun around a tree because he shot a poor score. There are several books dedicated to improving your sporting clays score. Think they could help a golfer?
Michael

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from philbourjaily wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Michael -- Most sporting clays books I'm aware of are technical and shooting-specific and may not help a golfer much. The one exception I know of is Gil and Vicki Ash's "You've Got To Be Out Of Your Mind" which is primarily about the mental side of sporting clays. It has helped me enjoy shooting more and might even keep a golfer from throwing clubs into the water hazard.

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from steve182 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

As i've gotten older i've realized you must put your anger aside, control it, if you have any hope to shoot a good score. Throwing clubs, wrapping them around trees, haven't done that in years! Too expensive and doesn't help you score, plus you feel like an idiot afterward.

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from Zermoid wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

"from cliff68
Every time I see a golf course I see a wasted rifle range"

Truer words were never spoken......

I enjoy miniature golf on occasion, other than that no interest in whacking my balls across hundreds of acres just to drop them in a little hole, just to pull them back out!

;-)

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from william giordano wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Since the Kennedy cousin brained Martha Moxley with a five iron, I propose that we outlaw golf. What to do with all the golf courses, you ask? On the front nine Jimmy Carter could build houses for the illegal immigrants and on the back nine we could establish farms to provide employment and food for said immigrants. Of course there would have to be clinics for the free health care.
Incidently, five hundred years ago when adult males beat the ground with crooked sticks and cursed, it was called witchcraft.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from bluecollarkid wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Speaking of shotguns and gold...check this out!

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2009/07/video-shotgun-master-cant-miss/

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from bluecollarkid wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

sorry, not "gold" but "golf"

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from JerryQuill wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

You can actually combine both games. A few years ago a buddy of mine down in Texas, bet me dinner that I couldn't hit his golf ball with my shot string once he teed off the ball. Well I took him up on that. I stood about twent yards to his front as he was about to tee off and had my shotgun with SK & SK in the barrels. Once he struck the ball I mounted the gun and took two quick shots like in Helice. It took us several minutes before we ever found the ball, but find it we did. Upon examination of the ball we found that one #9 pellet struck the ball and left it's mark. He bought dinner and wine that night. Anyone else?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from hunting022 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I had the opportunity in the early 90's to watch Tom Knapp play golf with a shotgun. The balls were fairly easy to follow but it sure messed up the tees and greens

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from Carney wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I have a handful of golfing friends. I tell them I'll get on the course right after I invent a "golfball bazooka"! I'll carry it and also a putter for the close shots! (But then again, it might be fun to launch a golf ball at the hole from 10 feet!)

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from mrstangblb wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I had the chance to go with a friend last year to the Master's in Augusta, and that was incredibly fun. Seeing how immaculate that place is and watching the talent those guys have (plus trying to evade the crowds following Tiger and Phil Mickelson) made me realize I've got a LONG way to go... but I'm just thankful to have any chance to get out and play maybe 4 or 5 rounds a year.

I'm ready for deer hunting season, though!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Love the golf hate... really I do. Anyway was thinking I was a ten handicap at my best but that's on your home course you play every day! If you can be a scratch golfer or better like the pros on a different course every week you are in another stratosphere.

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Post a Comment

from dneaster3 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I'm no scratch golfer, but I do split time between the gun range and the golf course and can attest that your observation is spot on. The similarities between the two are remarkable. Some that jump to mind are
* Hand-eye coordination
* Muscle memory
* Psuedo athleticism
* Business/networking opportunities
* Family-friendly
* Time/Money/Investment involved in playing
* Great metaphors for teaching life

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from micropterus wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

After working 40 hours a week, I go to my additional part time job working at a driving range. Since I work there I get to hit balls for free and I usually end up debating on spending the extra cash on a round of golf or a hundred rounds of ammo. I'm not that bad at golf, I have about a 15 handicap which isn't great, but I can usually shoot in the low 90's and occasionally the 80's. Oddly enough I suck at shooting anything that is moving. Go figure.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from streack wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Back when I played college golf I was scratch, but after two years I decided that my studies were more important than playing on the team. I still play a good game shooting mostly in the mid to high 70's. In golf and shotgunning I think the most important thing is being able to subconsciously react to different situations. It is very hard to tell yourself how to properly hit a golfball when you are telling yourself what to or not to do while swinging; in shotgunning this would be like sighting down the barrel while trying to shoot a crosser. Over time you can hone your skills so you can hit a golfball and shoot a shotgun without having to think about what your doing. Phil, I have never though of the correlation between golf and shotguns, but now that you mention it; they have more in common than one would imagine.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from cliff68 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Every time I see a golf course I see a wasted rifle range or motocross track.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ranger2 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I came from a golfing family... as a matter of fact, I have a second cousin that owns and operated a course in Scottsdale Az, and some of the big-timers in the family made their fortunes designing and developing golf courses and associated communities- from Denver to the Bahamas... my dad was not party to any of this and had a well developed disdain for the frivolity of the sport... so I grew up in Idaho, poverty stricken and devoid of the knowledge of golf... but we shot 12 gauge shells like they were going out of style- in every application available.
In college, I minored in physical education, and thus was introduced to golf- by way of the archery class it was coupled with (they are paired all of the time because they are both target sports...had not thought of that prior to the class...). I went on to be an assistant teacher for the class for a couple of semesters because I had a better knack for teaching archery than the Professor (one of my favorite instructors as well, and a friend still)... so I golfed a little more frequently, and was fairly successful, for a beginner.
Having studied a lot of kinesiology and motor development, I agree with the comments by dneaster3. Archery, golf, and shot gunning share a lot of traits both on the mental and physiological aspects, and I agree that mastering any of them will aid in proficiency for all of them.
My big two rules for golf are not common though, I will:
A.) NEVER keep score- it screws up your focus
B.) NEVER golf with people who are O.C.D. about golf (or wear psychedelic britches)

And every once in a while, I put all of my clubs (that I bought at Goodwill for $20) in the nylon bag that holds my collapsible camp chair and take it to the range... It sure draws some stares! But hey, you can’t waste being a redneck on just your hunting buddies!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from duff wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

My wife is an LPGA pro. She loves shooting and is a natural. I think one of her most effective qualities/skills is as KJ mentioned, the ability to focus and put a bad shot away(not forget it, but niether let it affect the next). She also has that ability to listen to a coach authentically and employ the advice, and she can watch a pro, then do the same herself. Those traits make her a good golfer as well as a good shot, and anyone with both that mental discipline and athletic ability can do the same.
She agrees with many of the posts that the flow and tempo of shooting and golf share many similarities. I played pro hockey, and there's a saying that hockey players make good golfers. I think it's mostly true although there are fewer similarities in game fundamentals. It may just be the swing and the shot...at least that's what Happy Gilmore would say.
One combination of golf and shooting that I've had the occasion to think about would be the addition of a shotgun to my golf bag on those days and courses when either Canada Geese or seagulls are more prevalent than grass.
Thanks.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tonahutu wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

You can also buy Zen Putting on Amazon for $15.30. Why pay more?

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from william giordano wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Since the Kennedy cousin brained Martha Moxley with a five iron, I propose that we outlaw golf. What to do with all the golf courses, you ask? On the front nine Jimmy Carter could build houses for the illegal immigrants and on the back nine we could establish farms to provide employment and food for said immigrants. Of course there would have to be clinics for the free health care.
Incidently, five hundred years ago when adult males beat the ground with crooked sticks and cursed, it was called witchcraft.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carney wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I have a handful of golfing friends. I tell them I'll get on the course right after I invent a "golfball bazooka"! I'll carry it and also a putter for the close shots! (But then again, it might be fun to launch a golf ball at the hole from 10 feet!)

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from uplander12 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

the only scratch in my golf game is when i scratch my head after I 4 putt for the 7th hole in a row.

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from seadog wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

The time & money needed to play golf would interfere with my other activities. I'd rather hunt, fish or scuba dive. That doesn't leave a lot of time for golf. If I could quit work, then maybe ...
P.S. I have tried it & I'm pretty much right there with uplander on the scratchin.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Beekeeper wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

First off I can't believe I actually got onto the site. For the past month or so when I click on all I get is waiting on F&S... It just sits and spins...

I handle a shotgun pretty well. In golf I have no idea where a drive is going. I do put decently so I reserve my golfing outings to the ocassional round of Putt-Putt!

Maybe golf can come up with a designated "putter" rule...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I broke 80 one time... a 40 on the front and a 39 on the back. Never made a hole in one but was 2" short. Story of my life. That was a lot of kids and pounds ago when golfing meant walking instead of riding and drinking. I went from golfing every week to a couple of times a year but still seem to shoot in the 80's or low 90's. John Daly just wore those pants in case he lost his cookies after last night's binge and no one would notice. Worked rather well. Poor Watson I almost cried on the 18th when he didn't put it away. Geezers never win any more, but boy was I proud. 59 and kicking! Tiger what??? Didn't even make the cut? Are you sure about that?

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from buckstopper wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

One of my most memorable days in Stuttgart was duck hunting in the morning and golfing in the afternoon.
However, golfs don't do well in gumbo, neither do skeets.

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from KJ wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Balance, tempo, focus, and the ability to put a bad shot behind you are necessary for either activity. However, the muscle memory required to do well in one is very different from the other. I don't have time to do either often enough to be really very good, but I enjoy both.

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from jbird wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

If it's nice enough to golf, it's nice enough to fish. And I don't fish NEARLY as much as I'd like to. Can see how it could be similar to shotgunning though.

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from Ralph the Rifleman wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I have only been into golf for the last couple of years, so there is no need to throw my score under bus...but I find fishing, in the casting effort, to be more akin to golf. Shotgun shooting to me takes less concentration to me then golfing, but I grew up shooting shotguns at around 12, and rifle shooting at 16, so at around 45ish taking up golf I am a baby to the sport!

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from RileyDog13 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

My free time is split fairly evenly between golf shooting, and poker. Earlier posts noted the universal need to put past dissapointments behind and focus on the next task. But that is universally valuable -in poker, marriage, and all else. Shooting and golfing skills are VERY different -Streccks comments are closest to my own thoughts -in the range of flexibility (or judgement or reaction)available during the underlying process -DURING the swing, shot, or hand. I'd put shooting directly between golf and poker on the pre-plan/execute within the rules and adjust/react continuum. But I am a hunter and shots are unpredictable, no muscle memory. Perhaps muscle memory is possible within the smaller shot range of trap shooting which places it closer to the plan/execution requirement of golf.

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from Tim Platt wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Poker? If I had every dime I ever spent on guns, golf and poker...

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from RileyDog13 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Worthwhile distinction to be made between putting and full swing. Putting is like driving -simple line and speed -no greater level of concentration, motor skills, or sobriety required. 5-irons, dove shoots, and cash games, however, require more of us. Citizenship always in the lead, a BAC of .06 is the responsible maximum and minimum to observe.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark-1 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

When I was in high school I lived on a golf course. My grandfather was an amateur golf champ that taught me the game. I had a five or seven handicap at that time blundering around bull-like. If I went up against real good golfers I would get my ass kicked. Departed golf due costs, and I’d rather shoot clay targets. So I know both sports….

Seriously, folks. It takes much more work to be a good golfer than a good wing shot. A self-taught wing shot can blunder bull-like into the upper shooting classes. You can’t do that in golf.

To be any good at golf means lessons from a pro, time playing, and some reflective thought.

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from dwaynez wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I play a few rounds a year, it gives me a chance to get together with some college friends, but after we lose most of our balls in the trees and water we pack up and go fishing.

We make a weekend of it and after getting ticked off at the golf course and our inability to really play well we have a few drinks, catch some fish, and share some laughs.

Oh and no one in our group wears daly pants, LOL!

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from ranger2 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I once had an epiphany while out shooting skeet. I had a bunch of old crappy range balls in the back of my rig, so I thought I would shoot a few of them to see if they made good targets- the effects were somewhat anticlimactic- they just bounced around on the ground a little and did not even open up- not even when hit with a .30 cal rifle. So I picked up a spent 12 gauge shell and set it on a post- golf ball balanced on top, and shot it off the shell from about 10 feet… better results. I moved in to basically point blank range, and blew the center out of the ball, and sent it a long ways down range- this turned into setting up a ball on a spent 3” shell, with a ball atop a spent 2 ¾ shell about an inch and a half behind it. If you line the muzzle of your shotgun up in a horizontal plane about 10 inches behind the rear ball and fire, the rear ball (and load of shot) strikes the front ball with such force as to generate a 600+ yard drive. The ball that is shot directly is blown to smithereens in the process, but it is a hell of a lot of fun! Thus, Shotgun Golf was born.
I am sure there are many that may question the intelligence of such activities, and those thoughts did cross my mind… but if you don’t live life on the edge, you are taking up too much room! And by the way, don’t try this at home!

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from FloridaHunter1226 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I just started golfing and with some lessons, I qould qualify myself as somewhat good... atleast that is what some of my friends tell me but then again, they are not such great golfers themselves. So maybe I am just the best of the worse. haha. But I will admit that I am into golf and it does have a lot to do with shooting. Including the need to relax and only think about the next target.

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from nelsol wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Yep, been playing golf since I was 4. Carried a scratch handicap for several years, but time catches up. I'm just trying to keep it under 10 for as long as I can.

I've never associated golf with shotgunning, but rather rifle and pistol shooting. In my case, they help each other. Being able to place a bullet precisely where you want it, and being able to hit a golf ball exactly where you want it to go---which ultimately is in the hole, to me mirror each other. Like the late Harvey Penick (golf teaching professional and author of the Little Red Book)always said, "Take Dead Aim".

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from steve182 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I have too many expensive and all consuming hobbies, Golf and Hunting being two of them. Every year during our "Cast and Blast" week we inckude at least one round of golf. suprisingly there is an excellent golf course 15 minutes from camp. I agree with the post above that Golf teaches great life skills, like hunting and shooting does. Takes great coordination and concentration, and you must forget the last shot and think only of the next. I'm no Scratch golfer, but when i'm on i shoot repectably in the 80's. Tough but great game. i will have to check out that book.

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from wingshooter54 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Sporting clays has often been referred to as "golf with a shotgun" The main difference being I have never seen a shooter think about wrapping a $2500 shotgun around a tree because he shot a poor score. There are several books dedicated to improving your sporting clays score. Think they could help a golfer?
Michael

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from philbourjaily wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Michael -- Most sporting clays books I'm aware of are technical and shooting-specific and may not help a golfer much. The one exception I know of is Gil and Vicki Ash's "You've Got To Be Out Of Your Mind" which is primarily about the mental side of sporting clays. It has helped me enjoy shooting more and might even keep a golfer from throwing clubs into the water hazard.

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from steve182 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

As i've gotten older i've realized you must put your anger aside, control it, if you have any hope to shoot a good score. Throwing clubs, wrapping them around trees, haven't done that in years! Too expensive and doesn't help you score, plus you feel like an idiot afterward.

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from Zermoid wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

"from cliff68
Every time I see a golf course I see a wasted rifle range"

Truer words were never spoken......

I enjoy miniature golf on occasion, other than that no interest in whacking my balls across hundreds of acres just to drop them in a little hole, just to pull them back out!

;-)

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from bluecollarkid wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Speaking of shotguns and gold...check this out!

http://www.wired.com/dangerroom/2009/07/video-shotgun-master-cant-miss/

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from bluecollarkid wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

sorry, not "gold" but "golf"

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from JerryQuill wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

You can actually combine both games. A few years ago a buddy of mine down in Texas, bet me dinner that I couldn't hit his golf ball with my shot string once he teed off the ball. Well I took him up on that. I stood about twent yards to his front as he was about to tee off and had my shotgun with SK & SK in the barrels. Once he struck the ball I mounted the gun and took two quick shots like in Helice. It took us several minutes before we ever found the ball, but find it we did. Upon examination of the ball we found that one #9 pellet struck the ball and left it's mark. He bought dinner and wine that night. Anyone else?

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from hunting022 wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I had the opportunity in the early 90's to watch Tom Knapp play golf with a shotgun. The balls were fairly easy to follow but it sure messed up the tees and greens

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from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

If they would have tournaments just for putting I would do ok. But I can't get a ball to fly straight, I guess being lrft handed eith a dominate right eye does not help?

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from mrstangblb wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I had the chance to go with a friend last year to the Master's in Augusta, and that was incredibly fun. Seeing how immaculate that place is and watching the talent those guys have (plus trying to evade the crowds following Tiger and Phil Mickelson) made me realize I've got a LONG way to go... but I'm just thankful to have any chance to get out and play maybe 4 or 5 rounds a year.

I'm ready for deer hunting season, though!

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from Tim Platt wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

Love the golf hate... really I do. Anyway was thinking I was a ten handicap at my best but that's on your home course you play every day! If you can be a scratch golfer or better like the pros on a different course every week you are in another stratosphere.

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from Bella wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

I'm with cliff68, golf is a waste of pasture! Golf courses are monocrops of grass that need chemicals and far far too much water, effecting aquifers and harming the ecosystem, all so fools in loud pants can waste time on a summers day. A body can waste time on a summers day without having to waylay quite so many resources, far better go go fishin or fling a few shafts (or rounds) downrange. I have no love for any pro sport involving spherical objects (without powder that is..) anyway. I tend to think people who work should get paid for it and people who play should not. But the wold has been turned upside down so many times already that who knows which way is up anyway.

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