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Wolfing One Down...

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June 19, 2009

Wolfing One Down...

By Scott Bestul

Last month I posted a pic of a fawn I’d found while enjoying a turkey hunting northern Wisconsin’s “big woods” region. In that post I mentioned the gauntlet of predators that young whitetail would have to run in order to survive to adulthood. Bears, bobcats, coyotes, even fishers are known to kill fawns.

But the alpha predator of Upper Midwestern deer lately is the timber wolf. This trail cam photo, dated only a few days ago, was sent to me by a Wisconsin buddy from the same region I turkey hunted. In the message, he noted that just days before his camera had captured a pic of a doe with her young fawn. This photo suggests that doe is now traveling solo. Assuming this photo has not been doctored in any way (I have no reason to believe it was), it’s pretty rare stuff.

Life is tough for young wildlife! Here in farm country, my neighbors just cut their first crop of hay, an event that always takes its share of fawns. One of the nesting robins in my backyard recently lost her four soon-to-hatch eggs to what I assume was a raccoon. Events like these remind me that survival is a day-by-day affair out there...and makes me appreciate the adults that manage to carry on the species.

Comments (32)

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from peter wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

the coyotes kill many fawns and deer where i live. they are really fun to hunt

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 60256 wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

This is why I love trail cams. It doesn't harm anything, but it gives an inside look at things that you would otherwise not see.

Nate

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jay wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Deer and Deer Hunting magazine has a section devoted to trail cams. The latest issue is devoted to predators capturing deer fawns. I don't think this is as rare as you think.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from trophyslayer wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

This is why I'm just as excited to take a coyote down as I am a large buck. I definitely don't want any coyotes on my land taking out future monster whitetails.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from seadog wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

This helps make the argument for thinning the predator herd. Wiley Coyote, you're goin' down!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big C wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

That is a pretty cool pic!! Thanks for sharing. Like Nate said, not knowing what you are going to get on a trail cam is what makes one exciting to have.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

That is nature at it's finest. Life giving Life.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

As I have commented and lamented various times on this blog and elsewhere the alien wolves are decimating the big game herds in Wyoming. It is at the point that we don't even consider coyotes to be a threat. If you look at www.codyenterprise.com you might still be able to read the recent story of a pack of wolves attacking and killing a local guy's labrador in Eagle Creek near Yellowstone. The article might not still be available on line but check if you are interested. Either way this particular fellow made several mistakes during his hike and unfortunately his dog died as a result of the encounter. He works for the Wyoming Game and Fish Dept. The area where he was camping is about two miles from where I first saw a wild wolf in 1988, years before the "re-introduction".

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

When does "wolf season" start ? I'm ready.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from muskiemaster wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

it's pictures like this that remind me to ask myself when wolf season begins because I will surely participate in that.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from klvthatsme wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Jay, I don't think the poster of the photo meant it is a rare happening in fact I think it is quite the opposite. I believe he meant it is rare to catch it on film.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from hal herring wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Interesting photo.

There are lots of wolves where I live, too, but the elk herds are still too big for the winter ranges that we have. The cattlemen are getting hit pretty hard, which is something that I've written about, and hope that the people who love having the wolves back will chip in and help with.

But my comment is this: All those predators killing all those fawns and running those adults, is what made these game animals so very beautiful to us- as the poet Robinson Jeffers wrote "what but the wolf's tooth, whittled so fine the fleet bones of the antelope?"

Now scientists say there was a N. Am. cheetah-like cat that made our antelope the fastest land animal, and in my opinion, made them the prettiest big game animal of all. Predators made elk so fast and majestic, honing down the species, killing off the weak and the slow and the stupid. Everything we love and admire in our big game animals is the result of thousands of years of predation. Without wolves, elk would be like Holsteins, mooing quietly by the roadside. Nobody would take the trouble to paint them on the wall of a cave in red ochre.

We'll have a wolf season, by and by, as cooler heads prevail. All those urban animal lover types who are raising sand with the lawsuits will eventually move on to other, even sillier projects. Very few of them have a real stake in anything that happens in actual wild country- just take a look at how little money they contribute to wildlife, compared to what we contribute through hunting licenses and P-R funds. If they really cared, they'd contribute. They'd be in DU and RMEF, etc. But that's very definitley off-topic.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from hal herring wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

ishawooa,
I hear you about the wolves down in your part of the country, too. I know you've got concerns there.

I'm sorry about that guy's Lab. That's a rough one. But my dog and I wander the country all over, and if the wolves get her, I can live with that. Last week, she (my dog is an old pit, beat from a life out in the country, and some poorly chosen opponents) chased a young grizz, and my son and I just turned around, bear spray in hand, and walked back toward the truck. I thought it was going to be a Viking funeral, but she showed up a few minutes later, all tuckered out.

I think we have to have some places left on earth where the dogs get killed by the wolves, and the bears take the fawns, and the rain falls on the just and the unjust alike. Good Lord knows it must be 80 percent of the planet where a dog can wander, on a leash, and the only predator out there is a Prius going 65 mph with a bald head hippy at the wheel trying to tune in the satellite radio and drink a latte at the same time.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

It's a cruel world out there kids. Good photo.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Heckava nice photo. Got no use for wolves myself. They take a high percentage of the moose and Caribou calves in Ak.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Yes. Because they are wolves. That's what they do, and have been doing since before we showed up.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from FloridaHunter1226 wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

When you sit down and think about it all... how hard it must have been for that animal to become an adult and the difficulties and struggles it had to go through, that is when you really start to respect the animal.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edstoresit wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Truly a rare to catch on camera. If you have ever had the opportunity to hunt a wolf, you will know that they haven't survived through the ages by being stupid. The wolf was, at one time, the most wide spread species of predator throughout North American. Colonization and domesticated livestock have slowly taken their habitat, and they survived. They have been hunted to extinction throughout the majority of their range and we are lucky that the are continuing to find a way to evolve and survive despite the pressure put to them by man.
As unlucky as that man who lost his lab was, we have to stop and think, was he in their world or were they in his? I'm sure this didn't happen in the back yard of a subdivision or at a park in a major city.
My oldest female lab (i have 4)was attacked by 2coyotes last year and were it not for the 3 other dogs charging to her rescue, I surely would have lost her. I didn't begrudge the coyote, as he was just trying to make a living, and I'm sure a 16 year old fat limping dog appeared to be easy pickin's. Thanks to the pack mentality that has evolved in the canus species, their attempt at an easy meal was thwarted.
I choose to live in the country; it is where I am most at home and where the good lord teaches us so much about ourselves and the planet upon which we live. I will always live in the country, taking what I need, leaving the rest. We all have a place here, and I believe, we all have a right(animals as well as man) to use the resources which were put on this earth, as long as we do so with a modicum of conservatism and sustainability.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ranger2 wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

I have been following the wolf reintro since '95 very closely. I think that the feds made a lot of very wide scale mistakes in how they have handled (or not handled) things. The whole program has been a sham from the get go.

In the same breath, wolves are incredible creatures, and they should have their place in the ecosystem, but the whole political atmosphere surrounding the program, and the liberal sentiment that has gone along with it have turned my stomach. I find it hard to not despise the reintroduced animals because of what they represent.(They were introduced animals if you make the destinction between North American Timber Wolves and Canadian Grays). They were not placed in the West through the proper use of the democratic system, they were crammed down the local communities' throats with no second thoughts about the true longterm, or short term impacts.
Six months after the Corn Creek release in '95, a pack came into the foothills about 3/4 of a mile from the local kids sledding hill and killed a freinds hound pup. They have been coming in and out of populated places all along- you just don't hear about it anymore if you are not "local".
I have a lot of mixed feelings, but mostly, I would like to see some serious depredation on the wolves- to get them back down to the original numbers FWS promised to maintain- not ten times more than that.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sage Sam wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

"I think we have to have some places left on earth where the dogs get killed by the wolves, and the bears take the fawns, and the rain falls on the just and the unjust alike."

Nothing else needs to be said, thanks Hal.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntcamp wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

I had a wolf eyeing my dog a few years back. It would not have liked the result or its attack. I was armed and I will protect my dog. Such is life, they are predators and have their place. Facts of the matter are this, the world has changed. There is less territory for them and they need to be managed as such. In WI they say that we have 550 wolves or so. Their goal was 350. Would not be such a problem, but most reside in northern WI. Pretty condensed. Could have jumped on 3 in 2 days while hunting last year. One had the mange, not sure if that is spelled correctly. It had only a speck of hair left. Not always the case, but most people who do not have a problem with wolves do not live around them. They are now starting to take livestock and 1 loss of a cow up north is a big deal for people up there. One example, Farmer had a beef cow get killed by wolves and actually proved it. They gave him $1 lb on the hoof. Cow was 800#, they were growing it for beef to feed their family. They were going for 1200#. Does not really make up the difference.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

Halherring you make some interesting comments and valid points. Very fair and knowledgeable commentary in my opinion. As I stated the wolf vs dog affair was unfortunate but actually the fault of the owner moreso than the wolves actions. In the wilderness you must keep track of everything you cherish from matches to animals because the mountains don't care.
Del I see Alaska has their resident wolf eradication program in full swing again this year. You can check it out on the state web site. All we want to make us happy in Wyoming is wolf management.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

I have never seen a wolf, but I've seen and shot quite a few of Maine's coyote. That animal in the photo looks exactly like a coyote to me. What are the markings that give away his identity?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntcamp wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

Look at the size, head size, snout.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntcamp wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

Look at the size, head size, snout.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from chuck slusser wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

I have had only a couple of encounters with wolfs. Most vivid memory of wolf was while hunting in northern Arizonia. a Mexican grey dessert wolf, very rare. and no mistake about it being a wolf of large scale.. you could not mistake it for anything else.. the other wolf encounter was on the wyoming/ montana border, agian no one would mistake it for a coyote... I have been looking at your photo and to me it would appear to be a coyote, the color is right, the size is right, the overall configuration, slender frame and legs coyote.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from BigWoodsHunter57 wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

If it were me and this picture was taken around where I hunt...I would be out trying to justify this one deer kill with about 40 dead coyotes

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntcamp wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

That is in no way a coyote. If it is, it is the biggest coyote on Earth. Just look at the length of the body and legs. Straighter snout is also a telling feature. Coyotes and wolves can be and often are the same color.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from GiantWhitetails wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

thats too bad. at least he cant eat all of em

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from big bear wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

i bettcha the pennsylvania game commision left that wolf go

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hunt_Hard wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

This is a WOLF. So quite calling it a coyote! But anyways it should be punished just for being a wolf. lol

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from JonWerning wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Hey, can you tell me if this pic is from the Pike Lake/Round Lake area southeast of Park Falls? I've got a trail cam photo from Sept., looks like the same wolf.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from hal herring wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

ishawooa,
I hear you about the wolves down in your part of the country, too. I know you've got concerns there.

I'm sorry about that guy's Lab. That's a rough one. But my dog and I wander the country all over, and if the wolves get her, I can live with that. Last week, she (my dog is an old pit, beat from a life out in the country, and some poorly chosen opponents) chased a young grizz, and my son and I just turned around, bear spray in hand, and walked back toward the truck. I thought it was going to be a Viking funeral, but she showed up a few minutes later, all tuckered out.

I think we have to have some places left on earth where the dogs get killed by the wolves, and the bears take the fawns, and the rain falls on the just and the unjust alike. Good Lord knows it must be 80 percent of the planet where a dog can wander, on a leash, and the only predator out there is a Prius going 65 mph with a bald head hippy at the wheel trying to tune in the satellite radio and drink a latte at the same time.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from FloridaHunter1226 wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

When you sit down and think about it all... how hard it must have been for that animal to become an adult and the difficulties and struggles it had to go through, that is when you really start to respect the animal.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from buckhunter wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

That is nature at it's finest. Life giving Life.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from hal herring wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Interesting photo.

There are lots of wolves where I live, too, but the elk herds are still too big for the winter ranges that we have. The cattlemen are getting hit pretty hard, which is something that I've written about, and hope that the people who love having the wolves back will chip in and help with.

But my comment is this: All those predators killing all those fawns and running those adults, is what made these game animals so very beautiful to us- as the poet Robinson Jeffers wrote "what but the wolf's tooth, whittled so fine the fleet bones of the antelope?"

Now scientists say there was a N. Am. cheetah-like cat that made our antelope the fastest land animal, and in my opinion, made them the prettiest big game animal of all. Predators made elk so fast and majestic, honing down the species, killing off the weak and the slow and the stupid. Everything we love and admire in our big game animals is the result of thousands of years of predation. Without wolves, elk would be like Holsteins, mooing quietly by the roadside. Nobody would take the trouble to paint them on the wall of a cave in red ochre.

We'll have a wolf season, by and by, as cooler heads prevail. All those urban animal lover types who are raising sand with the lawsuits will eventually move on to other, even sillier projects. Very few of them have a real stake in anything that happens in actual wild country- just take a look at how little money they contribute to wildlife, compared to what we contribute through hunting licenses and P-R funds. If they really cared, they'd contribute. They'd be in DU and RMEF, etc. But that's very definitley off-topic.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from ranger2 wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

I have been following the wolf reintro since '95 very closely. I think that the feds made a lot of very wide scale mistakes in how they have handled (or not handled) things. The whole program has been a sham from the get go.

In the same breath, wolves are incredible creatures, and they should have their place in the ecosystem, but the whole political atmosphere surrounding the program, and the liberal sentiment that has gone along with it have turned my stomach. I find it hard to not despise the reintroduced animals because of what they represent.(They were introduced animals if you make the destinction between North American Timber Wolves and Canadian Grays). They were not placed in the West through the proper use of the democratic system, they were crammed down the local communities' throats with no second thoughts about the true longterm, or short term impacts.
Six months after the Corn Creek release in '95, a pack came into the foothills about 3/4 of a mile from the local kids sledding hill and killed a freinds hound pup. They have been coming in and out of populated places all along- you just don't hear about it anymore if you are not "local".
I have a lot of mixed feelings, but mostly, I would like to see some serious depredation on the wolves- to get them back down to the original numbers FWS promised to maintain- not ten times more than that.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from klvthatsme wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Jay, I don't think the poster of the photo meant it is a rare happening in fact I think it is quite the opposite. I believe he meant it is rare to catch it on film.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

It's a cruel world out there kids. Good photo.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Edstoresit wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Truly a rare to catch on camera. If you have ever had the opportunity to hunt a wolf, you will know that they haven't survived through the ages by being stupid. The wolf was, at one time, the most wide spread species of predator throughout North American. Colonization and domesticated livestock have slowly taken their habitat, and they survived. They have been hunted to extinction throughout the majority of their range and we are lucky that the are continuing to find a way to evolve and survive despite the pressure put to them by man.
As unlucky as that man who lost his lab was, we have to stop and think, was he in their world or were they in his? I'm sure this didn't happen in the back yard of a subdivision or at a park in a major city.
My oldest female lab (i have 4)was attacked by 2coyotes last year and were it not for the 3 other dogs charging to her rescue, I surely would have lost her. I didn't begrudge the coyote, as he was just trying to make a living, and I'm sure a 16 year old fat limping dog appeared to be easy pickin's. Thanks to the pack mentality that has evolved in the canus species, their attempt at an easy meal was thwarted.
I choose to live in the country; it is where I am most at home and where the good lord teaches us so much about ourselves and the planet upon which we live. I will always live in the country, taking what I need, leaving the rest. We all have a place here, and I believe, we all have a right(animals as well as man) to use the resources which were put on this earth, as long as we do so with a modicum of conservatism and sustainability.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntcamp wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

I had a wolf eyeing my dog a few years back. It would not have liked the result or its attack. I was armed and I will protect my dog. Such is life, they are predators and have their place. Facts of the matter are this, the world has changed. There is less territory for them and they need to be managed as such. In WI they say that we have 550 wolves or so. Their goal was 350. Would not be such a problem, but most reside in northern WI. Pretty condensed. Could have jumped on 3 in 2 days while hunting last year. One had the mange, not sure if that is spelled correctly. It had only a speck of hair left. Not always the case, but most people who do not have a problem with wolves do not live around them. They are now starting to take livestock and 1 loss of a cow up north is a big deal for people up there. One example, Farmer had a beef cow get killed by wolves and actually proved it. They gave him $1 lb on the hoof. Cow was 800#, they were growing it for beef to feed their family. They were going for 1200#. Does not really make up the difference.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from peter wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

the coyotes kill many fawns and deer where i live. they are really fun to hunt

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 60256 wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

This is why I love trail cams. It doesn't harm anything, but it gives an inside look at things that you would otherwise not see.

Nate

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from jay wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Deer and Deer Hunting magazine has a section devoted to trail cams. The latest issue is devoted to predators capturing deer fawns. I don't think this is as rare as you think.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from trophyslayer wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

This is why I'm just as excited to take a coyote down as I am a large buck. I definitely don't want any coyotes on my land taking out future monster whitetails.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from seadog wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

This helps make the argument for thinning the predator herd. Wiley Coyote, you're goin' down!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big C wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

That is a pretty cool pic!! Thanks for sharing. Like Nate said, not knowing what you are going to get on a trail cam is what makes one exciting to have.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

As I have commented and lamented various times on this blog and elsewhere the alien wolves are decimating the big game herds in Wyoming. It is at the point that we don't even consider coyotes to be a threat. If you look at www.codyenterprise.com you might still be able to read the recent story of a pack of wolves attacking and killing a local guy's labrador in Eagle Creek near Yellowstone. The article might not still be available on line but check if you are interested. Either way this particular fellow made several mistakes during his hike and unfortunately his dog died as a result of the encounter. He works for the Wyoming Game and Fish Dept. The area where he was camping is about two miles from where I first saw a wild wolf in 1988, years before the "re-introduction".

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Big O wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

When does "wolf season" start ? I'm ready.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from muskiemaster wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

it's pictures like this that remind me to ask myself when wolf season begins because I will surely participate in that.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Del in KS wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Heckava nice photo. Got no use for wolves myself. They take a high percentage of the moose and Caribou calves in Ak.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

Yes. Because they are wolves. That's what they do, and have been doing since before we showed up.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sage Sam wrote 4 years 43 weeks ago

"I think we have to have some places left on earth where the dogs get killed by the wolves, and the bears take the fawns, and the rain falls on the just and the unjust alike."

Nothing else needs to be said, thanks Hal.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

Halherring you make some interesting comments and valid points. Very fair and knowledgeable commentary in my opinion. As I stated the wolf vs dog affair was unfortunate but actually the fault of the owner moreso than the wolves actions. In the wilderness you must keep track of everything you cherish from matches to animals because the mountains don't care.
Del I see Alaska has their resident wolf eradication program in full swing again this year. You can check it out on the state web site. All we want to make us happy in Wyoming is wolf management.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from libertyfirst wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

I have never seen a wolf, but I've seen and shot quite a few of Maine's coyote. That animal in the photo looks exactly like a coyote to me. What are the markings that give away his identity?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntcamp wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

Look at the size, head size, snout.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntcamp wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

Look at the size, head size, snout.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from chuck slusser wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

I have had only a couple of encounters with wolfs. Most vivid memory of wolf was while hunting in northern Arizonia. a Mexican grey dessert wolf, very rare. and no mistake about it being a wolf of large scale.. you could not mistake it for anything else.. the other wolf encounter was on the wyoming/ montana border, agian no one would mistake it for a coyote... I have been looking at your photo and to me it would appear to be a coyote, the color is right, the size is right, the overall configuration, slender frame and legs coyote.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from BigWoodsHunter57 wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

If it were me and this picture was taken around where I hunt...I would be out trying to justify this one deer kill with about 40 dead coyotes

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from GiantWhitetails wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

thats too bad. at least he cant eat all of em

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from big bear wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

i bettcha the pennsylvania game commision left that wolf go

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Hunt_Hard wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

This is a WOLF. So quite calling it a coyote! But anyways it should be punished just for being a wolf. lol

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from huntcamp wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

That is in no way a coyote. If it is, it is the biggest coyote on Earth. Just look at the length of the body and legs. Straighter snout is also a telling feature. Coyotes and wolves can be and often are the same color.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from JonWerning wrote 4 years 24 weeks ago

Hey, can you tell me if this pic is from the Pike Lake/Round Lake area southeast of Park Falls? I've got a trail cam photo from Sept., looks like the same wolf.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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