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Hunting

Coyote hunting

Uploaded on February 08, 2012

I have just started coyote hunting. Ive been out twice with no luck. Weve g ot a really crappy electronic caller. I was looking into the foxpro wildfire. Any reviews? Also ive been looking for a 22-250 rifle (preferably ar style) Any suggestions? Any tips for coyote hunting in general? Sets, gear( calls),sequences, ammo. ANYTHING. PLEASE HELP!

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from mdpaulus wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

I like to stay away from AR because one not as accuarate at long ranges as a bolt will be but most of all you want a gun as quite as possible in case a double is coming. Only two calls I use is red fox pup and cottontail distress. I did call one in with jackrabbit distress. I do some hand calling with the tally hoe. The fox pro in any model will work great. I prefer hand calling but it personal preference. Best I can tell you for sets is get as far off a road as you can and get as deep into their habitat as you can. Take the chance of busting them getting in because the farther you go the more sucess you will have. Lastly don't give up you may call 10 sets with no luck and anither 10 sets where you kill 8. Its spotty hunting dog since they move so much. I prefer the 40 grain hornady ammo it does not seem to tear up the hide as bad as the 50 grain does.

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from ssgtusmc wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

i will make a set and sit it for no more than 30 minutes. if i dont call in a dog or get at least a response, get up and move at least a half mile away. i stay away from cotton tail distress and jack rabbit distress in pressured areas. use something that seems out of the box, like fawn bleet, woodpecker, or house cat distress. might surprise you. also you can use an ar style weapon. i preffer it for the possible and eventual double. yes a bolt action is more accurate out to distance, but within 400 yds an ar style will do fine. do not be afraid to mix up your calls either. find something that works for you. there is no set sequence to calls. you can call hard for 3 minutes, then stop for 2, call for 1, stop for 4, etc. mix it up. its all up to what you are confident with. if there are hungry yotes around they will come running

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from jamesti wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

when i get set up, making sure my sillouette is hidden by brush, i begin calling. my first call is either a rabbit in distress or a pup in distress call. i call fairly lightly at first because these dogs have amazing hearing and will pick up the call from up to a mile away. most will over do it by calling too loud. i use a couple of short calls and wait a few minutes and do it over again. the yote will most likely come in from down wind. limit your movement and be ready to shoot quickly.

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from Coyotekid123 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Never ever skyline yourself! Always sit against a tree or build up a bunch of branches around yourself. I agree withmdpaulus that A.R's are not very accurate as any bolt action. As for calls I like closed reed call. You can put a lot more emotion into them. Two good ones are the knight and hale bt prey blaster and heckling howler. I actually use a .22 mag or .223. They are both good cartridges. If you hunt other animals on the same property I would use the .22 mag. lways start calling quietly and get louder. I usually hunt in one spot for 30min. If I don't see anything I move. Good spots are on dirt roads and along fence lines and tree lines with water nearby. When we built our pond we left a dirt mound. There's fence a couple feet away and we spray howlin heat on it. We hide behind the dirt mound and shoot them as they cross the fence.

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from Coyotekid123 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

My hit rate is usually 1 for every 3-5 stands or for every 18 we see we shoot 10. It's a game of luck.

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from DakotaMan wrote 27 weeks 12 hours ago

I use a Bushmaster Varminter and it shoots one inch groups at 300 yards. That is about the effective range for that round. It is deadly on doubles and scrambling coyotes. Can't think of anything deadlier. I've used a 25-06 for coyotes for decades. It has more range and is faster than a 22-250 when you use bullets big enough to stop coyotes beyond 300 yards. Calling works great, especially if your state allows calling at night. With snow and a full moon, they come on the run to just about anything. I'm looking to try the iPhone app iHunt with a wires horn speaker this winter. I also like to drive around in the spring with good snow on the ground and pick them off out to 600 yards or so with my 25-06.

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from The Muskie Man wrote 3 weeks 2 days ago

Long range or short? A .22-250 is fine.

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from DakotaMan wrote 27 weeks 12 hours ago

I use a Bushmaster Varminter and it shoots one inch groups at 300 yards. That is about the effective range for that round. It is deadly on doubles and scrambling coyotes. Can't think of anything deadlier. I've used a 25-06 for coyotes for decades. It has more range and is faster than a 22-250 when you use bullets big enough to stop coyotes beyond 300 yards. Calling works great, especially if your state allows calling at night. With snow and a full moon, they come on the run to just about anything. I'm looking to try the iPhone app iHunt with a wires horn speaker this winter. I also like to drive around in the spring with good snow on the ground and pick them off out to 600 yards or so with my 25-06.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from mdpaulus wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

I like to stay away from AR because one not as accuarate at long ranges as a bolt will be but most of all you want a gun as quite as possible in case a double is coming. Only two calls I use is red fox pup and cottontail distress. I did call one in with jackrabbit distress. I do some hand calling with the tally hoe. The fox pro in any model will work great. I prefer hand calling but it personal preference. Best I can tell you for sets is get as far off a road as you can and get as deep into their habitat as you can. Take the chance of busting them getting in because the farther you go the more sucess you will have. Lastly don't give up you may call 10 sets with no luck and anither 10 sets where you kill 8. Its spotty hunting dog since they move so much. I prefer the 40 grain hornady ammo it does not seem to tear up the hide as bad as the 50 grain does.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from ssgtusmc wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

i will make a set and sit it for no more than 30 minutes. if i dont call in a dog or get at least a response, get up and move at least a half mile away. i stay away from cotton tail distress and jack rabbit distress in pressured areas. use something that seems out of the box, like fawn bleet, woodpecker, or house cat distress. might surprise you. also you can use an ar style weapon. i preffer it for the possible and eventual double. yes a bolt action is more accurate out to distance, but within 400 yds an ar style will do fine. do not be afraid to mix up your calls either. find something that works for you. there is no set sequence to calls. you can call hard for 3 minutes, then stop for 2, call for 1, stop for 4, etc. mix it up. its all up to what you are confident with. if there are hungry yotes around they will come running

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jamesti wrote 2 years 9 weeks ago

when i get set up, making sure my sillouette is hidden by brush, i begin calling. my first call is either a rabbit in distress or a pup in distress call. i call fairly lightly at first because these dogs have amazing hearing and will pick up the call from up to a mile away. most will over do it by calling too loud. i use a couple of short calls and wait a few minutes and do it over again. the yote will most likely come in from down wind. limit your movement and be ready to shoot quickly.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Coyotekid123 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

Never ever skyline yourself! Always sit against a tree or build up a bunch of branches around yourself. I agree withmdpaulus that A.R's are not very accurate as any bolt action. As for calls I like closed reed call. You can put a lot more emotion into them. Two good ones are the knight and hale bt prey blaster and heckling howler. I actually use a .22 mag or .223. They are both good cartridges. If you hunt other animals on the same property I would use the .22 mag. lways start calling quietly and get louder. I usually hunt in one spot for 30min. If I don't see anything I move. Good spots are on dirt roads and along fence lines and tree lines with water nearby. When we built our pond we left a dirt mound. There's fence a couple feet away and we spray howlin heat on it. We hide behind the dirt mound and shoot them as they cross the fence.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Coyotekid123 wrote 2 years 8 weeks ago

My hit rate is usually 1 for every 3-5 stands or for every 18 we see we shoot 10. It's a game of luck.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from The Muskie Man wrote 3 weeks 2 days ago

Long range or short? A .22-250 is fine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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