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Make a Survival Kit out of an Altoids Tin

Make a Survival Kit out of an Altoids Tin

How To: Make a Survival Kit out of an Altoids Tin (and Two More Lifesaving DIY Projects)

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from focusfront wrote 5 years 13 weeks ago

The trouble with survival kits is that the more you think, the bigger the kit gets. My ideal survival kit would include some kind of firearm, if only a .22 handgun or takedown .22 rifle, but then it's too big to go everywhere you go. I suppose the idea is that it takes several days or even weeks to starve to death; if you can stay reasonably warm (fire), somewhat dry (space blanket), and hydrated (iodine tablets for the water) you should be able to stay alive until they come for you. It looks like the wilderness kit could do that, so it's a good kit. But just make room for a .22 kit gun and fifty rounds of ammo.

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from HillbillyDeluxe wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

This kit is amazing. Being small, compact, and easy to make and carry, I think this is something more hunters should use. Granted, it may not be perfect or 100% ideal, it is better than being stuck with nothing.

+11 Good Comment? | | Report
from WlidMan wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

The problem with survival kits is that most people won't carry one unless they know they need it.....who knows when you need it. I would pay a million dollars for a fireproof match, a garbage bag and an iodine tablet if I needed them. Small is great if you know how to use the kit. Get this one or make one and put it in your billfold. You can always spend a week building a better one if you know you're going into a high risk situation.

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from Jesse wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

this may not be all u need but i think every one should carry something like this in the outdoors

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from gunsgt1863 wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

While I like seeing all of the store bought and self-made survival kits, the best and most important things I have found is knowledge and experience. As an example, go outside right now and start a fire... without matches or a lighter. The "rubbing two sticks together" or bow-drill are not as easy as the sound.

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from pineyhunter wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

it's a great survival kit. i have 2. one is for emergencies only and the other one is for practice purposes. no sense making a kit if you don't know how anything will work in the field. what good is it if you don't know how to use anything you pack?it's better to learn from your mistakes in your own backyard, then out in a emergency situation.

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from BigNix28438 wrote 5 years 11 weeks ago

All the kits seem put together well. I agree practice is important. I will have to put that advice to work. I need some practice andwould be great father son activity. As far as bein just enough in it to kill you I would have to respectfully disagree. You could take a suitcase of stuff with you and lack of experience would render it useless. I plan on practicing more.

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from dus645 wrote 5 years 11 weeks ago

the hand sanitizer we all use is good help start
a fire,62%alcohol plus it cleans hands.one item
no one thinks to carry is safety goggles,may save
your eyes in the woods.

-3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Myxinekela wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

When he takes the fishing line from that plastic bag he will, doubtless, spend much happy time untangling the mess. As for the snare wire, unless you are practiced in snaring technique, you will waste valuable energy. If you insist on trying, I recommend a couple of slightly larger swivels to go between the wire and the anchor. Your prey will be most uncooperative and trash the snare. From experience the X-Acto blades are next to useless unless you need to lance an infection or similar activity. Back-up for a knife?? WOW! Carry a spare knife. I never leave home with fewer than 3. Can iodine tabs be used for antisepsis? And forget the cable saw; another energy waste even with a green sapling bow; even if the saw stays together.

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from Bobcat15 wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

Not everyone's kit will be the same. One should always have some sort of kit to throw into your pack while hiking, your jacket while hunting, or your tackle box. Just the idea of a survival kit begs one to consider what one might need to carry along. It is fun and necessary to examine the various kits and the remarks made by more experienced souls. I have carried some useless items around until I have decided on something else that seems more appropriate. Basics: Working compass, emergency blanket, waterproof matches plus a cheap lighter, water, knives (plural), signal mirror. I also carry a mini roll of duct tape, fishing line and hooks, water treatment, string, tea and bullion, titanium drinking and cooking cup (military canteen cup is fine), paper & pencil and fire tinder. When possible, I carry a handgun (great for signaling, etc.)and extra ammo.

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from jasonmarinvet wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

I agree that everyone should carry an emergengy survival kit, and they need to know how to use it. But I am unsure as to the firearm part. I think it would be best to know how to make hnting weapons. With firearms, you run the risk of it jamming up when you need it, forgeting to clean it, and rnning out of ammo for it. If you know how to make your own, even as a back-up, is probably the best thing you can do.

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from jcarlin wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

I think it's compact nature is exactly what makes it a good kit. It's not completely what you'd take backpacking our hunting, but it's small enough that you could habitually carry it in a pocket. You can have more equipment in a backpack or at camp, but the issue is when you get separated from these thing. It's the same philosophy as with defensive handguns. The best one is the one that is comfortable enough that you'll always carry it and therefore have it when the unexpected happens.

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from Christian Emter wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

I think it is better to load your own survival kit that way you can pick what YOU want. The contents you pick are the ones you think you need most.

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from huntergatherer wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

Survival kits are great but there is no substitute for taking a well planned course with a qualified instructor. They are fun and you meet great people. I have taken courses in Texas, South America, and Australia. Once you get hooked on survival training, it becomes as much of a hobby as hunting and fishing.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mathews347 wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

i would just take the altoids

-3 Good Comment? | | Report
from hdtail98 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

The most important thing in a survial kit is a good pocket knife!!!!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Brian W. Thair wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

Click on the last slide to read the text about the "component groups." Only then can you start to put a kit together that suits your worst conditions. Shelter and fire is always first. Learn how to use the stuff before you have to try it in the wind/rain/snow/cold/dark. We make a game out of the magnesium bar+striker rib to see who builds the quickest fire. 30 seconds isn't hard when you practice. I'll bet if I looked, there's 2 dozen disposable butane lighters scattered in my gear.

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from DustinW wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

I like how this kit is very compact but I would like my kit to have a small hand gun like a .22. Something to get food with If I lost my gun.

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from Christian Emter wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

I took a water proof credicard holder and stuffed it with a knife cotton matches, parachute cord, a flashlight and a caribiner clip.

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from Sportsman Matt wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

Seeing I carry my knife in the field and have 550 parachute cord for shoe laces, All I need to carry is a flint, some waterproof matches, iodine tablets, some fishing line and hooks. Everything else I can get in the field, I can build a shelter, fire, create a water canteen from bark and wood, and find clear water.

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from notquite wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

Nice kit, but not waterproof. I would recommend putting all that stuff in a ziplock, THEN putting it in the altoids box.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from dppeters2004 wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

I would like to revisit this topic for just one minute. I really appreciate everyones comments but I would like to say that if you want to make a top notch, easy to use survival kit, forget the altoids can mentality and use something like a tupperware sandwich container. This type of container is easy to carry, holds a lot more quality material than an altoids tin and is light weight as well. This type of container can fit in you pack or in a large vest pocket, is waterproof and it can save your life if properly loaded.

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from Cupidfish.com wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

oddly enough, I don't know what half that stuff is for..

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deluxesurvivalkits wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

A good survival kit is an important item in today's world. If you are interested in buying a survival kit with enough supplies to last you several days we have several kits at www.deluxesurvivalkits.com that are highly recommended. I hope this helps!

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from wolfpoint wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

There are many good suggestions here on the comment board,but I am surprised that nobody has mentioned that many of the smaller items can all be easily put into a 35mm film canister or even an old medicine bottle which can be carried in nearly any pocket and resists water and can often float depending on which contents are in it.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from carzyturkeykid wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

This is a great idea.

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from BillAlabama wrote 5 years 7 hours ago

Years ago Alabama passed a new hunter safety law and a buddy at work reported back from the classes. One of the teachers had fallen in a stream when a log broke and lay in the water with his leg twisted under him calculating the odds of survival. He had left most of his stuff in his truck. He now carries an extensive fanny pack BUT - the best kit is one you will carry with you. So the work buddy and I got into a small contest on making a pocket survival kit. I picked a big band-aid box that would barely fit my shirt pocket, but this little altoids tin kit looks like so much fun! Second point: In the eastern US, nobody stays lost for very long - 48 hours maybe?. Western US - different story. Different kit.

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from outdoorsman123 wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

i would also consider carrying a firearm and ammo. the survival kit i use is based off the british SAS survival kit. a good book about survival is SAS survival handbook

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from Elliott Balthazor wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Its really helpfull to have if you lose your gun or just to have in case the unthinkable happens.

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from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 40 weeks ago

This is a gret idea.....I definitely use that on my next adventure!!!!!!

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from firemedic4life wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

This is a great little kit. Does it contain every thing that person who is not use to being out in the enviroment or in incliment weather ? ( no ) However I believe that most everyone that I hunt,hike,or fish with including my three boys ages 10-17 could survive the elements for the first 72 hours with what is in this kit. Remember that if you are out in the woods hunting or hiking or even just taking pictures that you will have a minimal amount of equipment with you from firearms to even perhaps a shelter or maybe just a camera. If you use your imagination you can come up with some awsome ideals with a small amount of supplies. The number one key thing is confidence. You must have confidence that you can get through this tuff situation and will be O.K. So in my opinion this type of small kit is perfect for everyone, I have one that stays in my pack that I made from a plastic soap holder that can double as a digging tool or a drinking cup. the overall outcome is limit less with a good imagination.
God Bless

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from Cabohusky wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

This is an awsome little kit. I more or less won't make this exact one but I will find something to make a emergency kit to clip on a pack or on my side. Fishing hooks and line should be a part of a kit if you are out and around areas with water. I mean you never know, you may get hungry, and a hook or 2 and line wont take up much room if you know how to pack the line right..

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from hjohn429 wrote 4 years 31 weeks ago

I would never carry that emergency pack. I don't see ANY GOOD reason to carry a small kit that won't keep you alive when you can just carry a backpack full of EVERYTHING you need.

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from John Boy20 wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

In my personal Opinion the best for survival is mainly common sense if you have a simple pocket knife or Survivalist Knife, and some flint then you are more than capable of surviving the worst of situations it always helps to have something small and handy like this kit around for some extra aid. if you have a knife you can eat the bark off certain trees and different plants to get nutrition from. and the flint if you can properly work it creates the fire that could keep you warm and keep larger animals away. Plus a small little axe that you can carry in a backpack or something can also come in handy for firewood and hunting purposes that is if you can throw one. Three simple items and the possibilities of your survival are endless

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from natureguy wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

The only good survival kit is one you bring with you and know how to use. I have mine in a fanny pack-- it has a small hatchet, 2 mag lites, and a spare set of batteries. I carry a bike flasher which can be seen for hundreds of yards especially if you climbed a tree and attached it up high. Put it on it's intermintent setting and it will flash for 200 hours-also usefull for dragging out your deer after dark. A sturdy space blanket and large orange garbage bag, first aid kit,signal mirror, some waterproof fire starter, a couple of lighters, a regular swiss army knife and a small water bottle are included. Throw in a few granola bars and a couple of juice boxes, 50' of parachute cord and you're good to go. Anyway this is my version. Yes it weighs a bit but it's got you covered for a day or 2 lost in the woods.

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from Sourdough Dave wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

The best survival gear is the gear that you actually have because it is carried on your person. So I applaud your altoids box kit. I have unfortunately had first hand experience and have written extensively on the subject. Believe me you have done your homework well on this one. As mentioned elsewhere the main thing missing would be an emergency blanket. I always carry two knives, one fixed one folding, at least three means of making fire, and water with a purification method to get more. This with an emergency blanket and some cordage will keep me alive through a few nights of sleeping rough.

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from combat.medic wrote 4 years 13 weeks ago

as for the finger saw/wire saw, I noticed someone said that they're useless. That depends on the one used. If you've had bad experiences with one before, it's probably because you bought the cheapest one wal-mart had to offer. One thing I've found is that you get what you pay for. If you're going to put in the time and effort to make a survival kit of any size or caliber, make sure you're using quality products. In the same respect, make sure what you use doesn't expire, or keep expiration dates in mind when putting it together. Even if you don't ever use it, set aside a little time once in a while to check the stuff inside: rust on a blade or wire will affect its performance when you need it most!

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from xavier5735 wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

i loved this kit i bring it every time i go hunting or fishing. its awesome because its small, and has prakticly no rattling. some cons were to small for extra things and its hard...no impossible to find some quality quick tab fire starters, let alone some in the first place.i would suggest that you add a small tube of super glue, for like sealing your water bag or sticking the fishing line on a stick for a pole

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from lars evart wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

I'm new to this site, and appreciate the good ideas. I looked at an altiods tin a couple of years ago,too small for me.I have access to small ink tins, very thin and light, yet still rigid. Covers fit tightly and with electrical tape they are waterproof. They are 2/3 larger than altoids (3 3/8 dia x 1 1/8 thick). I have packed a lot of gear in mine; hack Saw blade,needles,fish line, hooks,magnesium fire starter,cotton balls with vicks,exacto blades,aspirin,q-tips,hone,wire, plastic tube,copper wire,wire saw,ss wire,safety pins,emory board,chalk,tooth picks, lense. Yes, it's packed,but will fit in my back pocket. My key ring also is a tool kit of sorts with boy scout sparker, exacto blades,hacksaw blade in a plastic tube with cotter pin, 4 1/2" steel tube cut on an angle hypodermic needle style the taped back together and drilled on one end to accomodate the saw blade and cotter pin. The tube is sharpened on the other end as a punch, with a pencil slid inside. My wallet contains a razor blade,a large needle and thread, silk to magnetize the needle for use as an emergency compass, and a p38. I also keep dental floss,knife,my gerber tool,and a zippo with extra flint inside. My dad,Boy Scouts,search and rescue, and a stint in the militia, have all helped make me aware that sometimes even with people around I may be on my own. Self reliance is our best reliance...Lars

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from Trappperman9 wrote 3 years 17 weeks ago

I've always wanted to make one of these. My dad gave me one last christmas. Except it was inside a closed sardines can. Ver neat idea!

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from funguy wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Hey all,

I've been reading a lot of your comments. However, I think you are carrying too much stuff.

The essentials:

1) A well made compass. Suunto puts out a great compact floatable compass, that can double as a signal mirror.

2) Fire. Swedish firesteel. It Will light even if wet, in snow ect..

3) A good knife. Preferable single piece or one that can lock off.

4) A stainless steal container for storage. Why. So that you can cook in it and boil water to kill parasites.

5) Paracord and a carabiner. With a munters hitch and a couple figure eights (knots) you can repel off a cliff if you have to. Paracord can also be used for lashing together a shelter.

Really, everything else is unnecessary. You've covered water (boiling), fire (heat), shelter and obstacles (paracord).

------
Note: You could use a piece of steel wool and your cell phone battery to light a fire. Which maybe a good back up for your fire stick.

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from Rhinolino wrote 2 years 33 weeks ago

This is a great little kit.

It sure beats carrying around some huge backpack with everything little thing when you are out and about.

However having a fully stocked kit at home is a great idea as well.

www.survivalkitsupplies.com

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from jmshackelfo@aol.com wrote 2 years 21 weeks ago

I think this would make a great cheap christmas gifts. But the Altoids can isn't water proof. I found when I was fly fishing and had my flys in one.

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from Nicholas Pickle... wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

I agree with funguy - the minature light is completely unneccessary. If you did want to include a torch/flashlight you'd be better off placing it in your secondary kit (stuff in a small backpack you carry everywhere) and make sure it's a good one like LED Lenser or Petzl rather than a crappy 1 LED light that's good for nothing except lighting up a keyhole at night to put the key in the door.

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from Nicholas Pickle... wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

xavier6735 - it's called a knot, super glue is not what first comes to mind if I want to attach fishing line to a stick

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from 357 wrote 1 year 48 weeks ago

i would have some tippet material, never caught a blue gill with braided line, however attach a tippet and you're in business.

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from DarolG wrote 1 year 47 weeks ago

Everyone has different needs for their survival kit and everything may not completely fit in a small container but what I find interesting is how many people who comment that they keep their kit in their backpack.

My survival kit is meant to be kept on my person (pockets, around my neck, attached to my belt, belt loops, shoe laces, etc.) in the event that I become separated from my Pack or Gear.

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from Lyla Burns wrote 1 year 41 weeks ago

I would love to make a personal survival kit for each person in my family. My kids would love to have something like this. This seems like something I could definitely do. Thanks for sharing!

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from Leila Kliner wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

could someone please post a printable (readable)version of the instructions for water purification tablets and fishing knots.

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from caligirl wrote 46 weeks 1 day ago

You can tell this was written by a man because their is dry underwear but no way to support the big boobed of us! I'd rather go without panties then a wet and cold bra. Or even worse....NO BRA!!! If you want to hinder survival, unsupported boobs are in the top 5. I know men don't understand this, which is why I know this article was written by a man. However that is the only fault really. Other then some of the bigger packs might get you targeted. So as he says, always keep a pocket knife on you.

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from Josh Kennedy wrote 42 weeks 1 day ago

Survival kit written by an idealist. VERY few cases where people get lost for more than a week. You won't need food for several days at least, and never eat if you have no water. Focus kit on fire, shelter, water, and getting found. Finding food is left for really bad case survival, like a plane crash in a remote area, for example. Very, very few places in the US where you are looking at 3+ days. Best survival kit is your head. If people know where to look for you, stay put. Where will you navigate to with a button compass? Your declination can swing well over 30 degrees depending on where you are. Without a map, a compass is pretty much a waste. If no one knows where you are, keep moving down hill, and if you find water, keep moving downstream. Number one thing that will kill you is lack of water.

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from HillbillyDeluxe wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

This kit is amazing. Being small, compact, and easy to make and carry, I think this is something more hunters should use. Granted, it may not be perfect or 100% ideal, it is better than being stuck with nothing.

+11 Good Comment? | | Report
from gunsgt1863 wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

While I like seeing all of the store bought and self-made survival kits, the best and most important things I have found is knowledge and experience. As an example, go outside right now and start a fire... without matches or a lighter. The "rubbing two sticks together" or bow-drill are not as easy as the sound.

+8 Good Comment? | | Report
from WlidMan wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

The problem with survival kits is that most people won't carry one unless they know they need it.....who knows when you need it. I would pay a million dollars for a fireproof match, a garbage bag and an iodine tablet if I needed them. Small is great if you know how to use the kit. Get this one or make one and put it in your billfold. You can always spend a week building a better one if you know you're going into a high risk situation.

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from BigNix28438 wrote 5 years 11 weeks ago

All the kits seem put together well. I agree practice is important. I will have to put that advice to work. I need some practice andwould be great father son activity. As far as bein just enough in it to kill you I would have to respectfully disagree. You could take a suitcase of stuff with you and lack of experience would render it useless. I plan on practicing more.

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from pineyhunter wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

it's a great survival kit. i have 2. one is for emergencies only and the other one is for practice purposes. no sense making a kit if you don't know how anything will work in the field. what good is it if you don't know how to use anything you pack?it's better to learn from your mistakes in your own backyard, then out in a emergency situation.

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from focusfront wrote 5 years 13 weeks ago

The trouble with survival kits is that the more you think, the bigger the kit gets. My ideal survival kit would include some kind of firearm, if only a .22 handgun or takedown .22 rifle, but then it's too big to go everywhere you go. I suppose the idea is that it takes several days or even weeks to starve to death; if you can stay reasonably warm (fire), somewhat dry (space blanket), and hydrated (iodine tablets for the water) you should be able to stay alive until they come for you. It looks like the wilderness kit could do that, so it's a good kit. But just make room for a .22 kit gun and fifty rounds of ammo.

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from Myxinekela wrote 5 years 10 weeks ago

When he takes the fishing line from that plastic bag he will, doubtless, spend much happy time untangling the mess. As for the snare wire, unless you are practiced in snaring technique, you will waste valuable energy. If you insist on trying, I recommend a couple of slightly larger swivels to go between the wire and the anchor. Your prey will be most uncooperative and trash the snare. From experience the X-Acto blades are next to useless unless you need to lance an infection or similar activity. Back-up for a knife?? WOW! Carry a spare knife. I never leave home with fewer than 3. Can iodine tabs be used for antisepsis? And forget the cable saw; another energy waste even with a green sapling bow; even if the saw stays together.

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from jcarlin wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

I think it's compact nature is exactly what makes it a good kit. It's not completely what you'd take backpacking our hunting, but it's small enough that you could habitually carry it in a pocket. You can have more equipment in a backpack or at camp, but the issue is when you get separated from these thing. It's the same philosophy as with defensive handguns. The best one is the one that is comfortable enough that you'll always carry it and therefore have it when the unexpected happens.

+5 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jesse wrote 5 years 12 weeks ago

this may not be all u need but i think every one should carry something like this in the outdoors

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from Bobcat15 wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

Not everyone's kit will be the same. One should always have some sort of kit to throw into your pack while hiking, your jacket while hunting, or your tackle box. Just the idea of a survival kit begs one to consider what one might need to carry along. It is fun and necessary to examine the various kits and the remarks made by more experienced souls. I have carried some useless items around until I have decided on something else that seems more appropriate. Basics: Working compass, emergency blanket, waterproof matches plus a cheap lighter, water, knives (plural), signal mirror. I also carry a mini roll of duct tape, fishing line and hooks, water treatment, string, tea and bullion, titanium drinking and cooking cup (military canteen cup is fine), paper & pencil and fire tinder. When possible, I carry a handgun (great for signaling, etc.)and extra ammo.

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from huntergatherer wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

Survival kits are great but there is no substitute for taking a well planned course with a qualified instructor. They are fun and you meet great people. I have taken courses in Texas, South America, and Australia. Once you get hooked on survival training, it becomes as much of a hobby as hunting and fishing.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from hdtail98 wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

The most important thing in a survial kit is a good pocket knife!!!!

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Brian W. Thair wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

Click on the last slide to read the text about the "component groups." Only then can you start to put a kit together that suits your worst conditions. Shelter and fire is always first. Learn how to use the stuff before you have to try it in the wind/rain/snow/cold/dark. We make a game out of the magnesium bar+striker rib to see who builds the quickest fire. 30 seconds isn't hard when you practice. I'll bet if I looked, there's 2 dozen disposable butane lighters scattered in my gear.

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from DustinW wrote 5 years 7 weeks ago

I like how this kit is very compact but I would like my kit to have a small hand gun like a .22. Something to get food with If I lost my gun.

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from notquite wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

Nice kit, but not waterproof. I would recommend putting all that stuff in a ziplock, THEN putting it in the altoids box.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from dppeters2004 wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

I would like to revisit this topic for just one minute. I really appreciate everyones comments but I would like to say that if you want to make a top notch, easy to use survival kit, forget the altoids can mentality and use something like a tupperware sandwich container. This type of container is easy to carry, holds a lot more quality material than an altoids tin and is light weight as well. This type of container can fit in you pack or in a large vest pocket, is waterproof and it can save your life if properly loaded.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from wolfpoint wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

There are many good suggestions here on the comment board,but I am surprised that nobody has mentioned that many of the smaller items can all be easily put into a 35mm film canister or even an old medicine bottle which can be carried in nearly any pocket and resists water and can often float depending on which contents are in it.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from BillAlabama wrote 5 years 7 hours ago

Years ago Alabama passed a new hunter safety law and a buddy at work reported back from the classes. One of the teachers had fallen in a stream when a log broke and lay in the water with his leg twisted under him calculating the odds of survival. He had left most of his stuff in his truck. He now carries an extensive fanny pack BUT - the best kit is one you will carry with you. So the work buddy and I got into a small contest on making a pocket survival kit. I picked a big band-aid box that would barely fit my shirt pocket, but this little altoids tin kit looks like so much fun! Second point: In the eastern US, nobody stays lost for very long - 48 hours maybe?. Western US - different story. Different kit.

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from outdoorsman123 wrote 4 years 42 weeks ago

i would also consider carrying a firearm and ammo. the survival kit i use is based off the british SAS survival kit. a good book about survival is SAS survival handbook

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from firemedic4life wrote 4 years 38 weeks ago

This is a great little kit. Does it contain every thing that person who is not use to being out in the enviroment or in incliment weather ? ( no ) However I believe that most everyone that I hunt,hike,or fish with including my three boys ages 10-17 could survive the elements for the first 72 hours with what is in this kit. Remember that if you are out in the woods hunting or hiking or even just taking pictures that you will have a minimal amount of equipment with you from firearms to even perhaps a shelter or maybe just a camera. If you use your imagination you can come up with some awsome ideals with a small amount of supplies. The number one key thing is confidence. You must have confidence that you can get through this tuff situation and will be O.K. So in my opinion this type of small kit is perfect for everyone, I have one that stays in my pack that I made from a plastic soap holder that can double as a digging tool or a drinking cup. the overall outcome is limit less with a good imagination.
God Bless

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from lars evart wrote 4 years 10 weeks ago

I'm new to this site, and appreciate the good ideas. I looked at an altiods tin a couple of years ago,too small for me.I have access to small ink tins, very thin and light, yet still rigid. Covers fit tightly and with electrical tape they are waterproof. They are 2/3 larger than altoids (3 3/8 dia x 1 1/8 thick). I have packed a lot of gear in mine; hack Saw blade,needles,fish line, hooks,magnesium fire starter,cotton balls with vicks,exacto blades,aspirin,q-tips,hone,wire, plastic tube,copper wire,wire saw,ss wire,safety pins,emory board,chalk,tooth picks, lense. Yes, it's packed,but will fit in my back pocket. My key ring also is a tool kit of sorts with boy scout sparker, exacto blades,hacksaw blade in a plastic tube with cotter pin, 4 1/2" steel tube cut on an angle hypodermic needle style the taped back together and drilled on one end to accomodate the saw blade and cotter pin. The tube is sharpened on the other end as a punch, with a pencil slid inside. My wallet contains a razor blade,a large needle and thread, silk to magnetize the needle for use as an emergency compass, and a p38. I also keep dental floss,knife,my gerber tool,and a zippo with extra flint inside. My dad,Boy Scouts,search and rescue, and a stint in the militia, have all helped make me aware that sometimes even with people around I may be on my own. Self reliance is our best reliance...Lars

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from Christian Emter wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

I think it is better to load your own survival kit that way you can pick what YOU want. The contents you pick are the ones you think you need most.

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from Christian Emter wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

I took a water proof credicard holder and stuffed it with a knife cotton matches, parachute cord, a flashlight and a caribiner clip.

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from Sportsman Matt wrote 5 years 6 weeks ago

Seeing I carry my knife in the field and have 550 parachute cord for shoe laces, All I need to carry is a flint, some waterproof matches, iodine tablets, some fishing line and hooks. Everything else I can get in the field, I can build a shelter, fire, create a water canteen from bark and wood, and find clear water.

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from Elliott Balthazor wrote 4 years 41 weeks ago

Its really helpfull to have if you lose your gun or just to have in case the unthinkable happens.

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from John Boy20 wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

In my personal Opinion the best for survival is mainly common sense if you have a simple pocket knife or Survivalist Knife, and some flint then you are more than capable of surviving the worst of situations it always helps to have something small and handy like this kit around for some extra aid. if you have a knife you can eat the bark off certain trees and different plants to get nutrition from. and the flint if you can properly work it creates the fire that could keep you warm and keep larger animals away. Plus a small little axe that you can carry in a backpack or something can also come in handy for firewood and hunting purposes that is if you can throw one. Three simple items and the possibilities of your survival are endless

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from Rhinolino wrote 2 years 33 weeks ago

This is a great little kit.

It sure beats carrying around some huge backpack with everything little thing when you are out and about.

However having a fully stocked kit at home is a great idea as well.

www.survivalkitsupplies.com

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from jasonmarinvet wrote 5 years 9 weeks ago

I agree that everyone should carry an emergengy survival kit, and they need to know how to use it. But I am unsure as to the firearm part. I think it would be best to know how to make hnting weapons. With firearms, you run the risk of it jamming up when you need it, forgeting to clean it, and rnning out of ammo for it. If you know how to make your own, even as a back-up, is probably the best thing you can do.

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from Cupidfish.com wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

oddly enough, I don't know what half that stuff is for..

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from carzyturkeykid wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

This is a great idea.

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from rudyglove27 wrote 4 years 40 weeks ago

This is a gret idea.....I definitely use that on my next adventure!!!!!!

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from Cabohusky wrote 4 years 33 weeks ago

This is an awsome little kit. I more or less won't make this exact one but I will find something to make a emergency kit to clip on a pack or on my side. Fishing hooks and line should be a part of a kit if you are out and around areas with water. I mean you never know, you may get hungry, and a hook or 2 and line wont take up much room if you know how to pack the line right..

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from hjohn429 wrote 4 years 31 weeks ago

I would never carry that emergency pack. I don't see ANY GOOD reason to carry a small kit that won't keep you alive when you can just carry a backpack full of EVERYTHING you need.

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from natureguy wrote 4 years 26 weeks ago

The only good survival kit is one you bring with you and know how to use. I have mine in a fanny pack-- it has a small hatchet, 2 mag lites, and a spare set of batteries. I carry a bike flasher which can be seen for hundreds of yards especially if you climbed a tree and attached it up high. Put it on it's intermintent setting and it will flash for 200 hours-also usefull for dragging out your deer after dark. A sturdy space blanket and large orange garbage bag, first aid kit,signal mirror, some waterproof fire starter, a couple of lighters, a regular swiss army knife and a small water bottle are included. Throw in a few granola bars and a couple of juice boxes, 50' of parachute cord and you're good to go. Anyway this is my version. Yes it weighs a bit but it's got you covered for a day or 2 lost in the woods.

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from Sourdough Dave wrote 4 years 18 weeks ago

The best survival gear is the gear that you actually have because it is carried on your person. So I applaud your altoids box kit. I have unfortunately had first hand experience and have written extensively on the subject. Believe me you have done your homework well on this one. As mentioned elsewhere the main thing missing would be an emergency blanket. I always carry two knives, one fixed one folding, at least three means of making fire, and water with a purification method to get more. This with an emergency blanket and some cordage will keep me alive through a few nights of sleeping rough.

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from combat.medic wrote 4 years 13 weeks ago

as for the finger saw/wire saw, I noticed someone said that they're useless. That depends on the one used. If you've had bad experiences with one before, it's probably because you bought the cheapest one wal-mart had to offer. One thing I've found is that you get what you pay for. If you're going to put in the time and effort to make a survival kit of any size or caliber, make sure you're using quality products. In the same respect, make sure what you use doesn't expire, or keep expiration dates in mind when putting it together. Even if you don't ever use it, set aside a little time once in a while to check the stuff inside: rust on a blade or wire will affect its performance when you need it most!

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from funguy wrote 3 years 12 weeks ago

Hey all,

I've been reading a lot of your comments. However, I think you are carrying too much stuff.

The essentials:

1) A well made compass. Suunto puts out a great compact floatable compass, that can double as a signal mirror.

2) Fire. Swedish firesteel. It Will light even if wet, in snow ect..

3) A good knife. Preferable single piece or one that can lock off.

4) A stainless steal container for storage. Why. So that you can cook in it and boil water to kill parasites.

5) Paracord and a carabiner. With a munters hitch and a couple figure eights (knots) you can repel off a cliff if you have to. Paracord can also be used for lashing together a shelter.

Really, everything else is unnecessary. You've covered water (boiling), fire (heat), shelter and obstacles (paracord).

------
Note: You could use a piece of steel wool and your cell phone battery to light a fire. Which maybe a good back up for your fire stick.

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from xavier5735 wrote 4 years 12 weeks ago

i loved this kit i bring it every time i go hunting or fishing. its awesome because its small, and has prakticly no rattling. some cons were to small for extra things and its hard...no impossible to find some quality quick tab fire starters, let alone some in the first place.i would suggest that you add a small tube of super glue, for like sealing your water bag or sticking the fishing line on a stick for a pole

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from Trappperman9 wrote 3 years 17 weeks ago

I've always wanted to make one of these. My dad gave me one last christmas. Except it was inside a closed sardines can. Ver neat idea!

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from jmshackelfo@aol.com wrote 2 years 21 weeks ago

I think this would make a great cheap christmas gifts. But the Altoids can isn't water proof. I found when I was fly fishing and had my flys in one.

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from Nicholas Pickle... wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

I agree with funguy - the minature light is completely unneccessary. If you did want to include a torch/flashlight you'd be better off placing it in your secondary kit (stuff in a small backpack you carry everywhere) and make sure it's a good one like LED Lenser or Petzl rather than a crappy 1 LED light that's good for nothing except lighting up a keyhole at night to put the key in the door.

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from Nicholas Pickle... wrote 2 years 5 weeks ago

xavier6735 - it's called a knot, super glue is not what first comes to mind if I want to attach fishing line to a stick

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from 357 wrote 1 year 48 weeks ago

i would have some tippet material, never caught a blue gill with braided line, however attach a tippet and you're in business.

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from DarolG wrote 1 year 47 weeks ago

Everyone has different needs for their survival kit and everything may not completely fit in a small container but what I find interesting is how many people who comment that they keep their kit in their backpack.

My survival kit is meant to be kept on my person (pockets, around my neck, attached to my belt, belt loops, shoe laces, etc.) in the event that I become separated from my Pack or Gear.

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from Lyla Burns wrote 1 year 41 weeks ago

I would love to make a personal survival kit for each person in my family. My kids would love to have something like this. This seems like something I could definitely do. Thanks for sharing!

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from Leila Kliner wrote 1 year 36 weeks ago

could someone please post a printable (readable)version of the instructions for water purification tablets and fishing knots.

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from caligirl wrote 46 weeks 1 day ago

You can tell this was written by a man because their is dry underwear but no way to support the big boobed of us! I'd rather go without panties then a wet and cold bra. Or even worse....NO BRA!!! If you want to hinder survival, unsupported boobs are in the top 5. I know men don't understand this, which is why I know this article was written by a man. However that is the only fault really. Other then some of the bigger packs might get you targeted. So as he says, always keep a pocket knife on you.

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from Josh Kennedy wrote 42 weeks 1 day ago

Survival kit written by an idealist. VERY few cases where people get lost for more than a week. You won't need food for several days at least, and never eat if you have no water. Focus kit on fire, shelter, water, and getting found. Finding food is left for really bad case survival, like a plane crash in a remote area, for example. Very, very few places in the US where you are looking at 3+ days. Best survival kit is your head. If people know where to look for you, stay put. Where will you navigate to with a button compass? Your declination can swing well over 30 degrees depending on where you are. Without a map, a compass is pretty much a waste. If no one knows where you are, keep moving down hill, and if you find water, keep moving downstream. Number one thing that will kill you is lack of water.

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from deluxesurvivalkits wrote 5 years 5 weeks ago

A good survival kit is an important item in today's world. If you are interested in buying a survival kit with enough supplies to last you several days we have several kits at www.deluxesurvivalkits.com that are highly recommended. I hope this helps!

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from dus645 wrote 5 years 11 weeks ago

the hand sanitizer we all use is good help start
a fire,62%alcohol plus it cleans hands.one item
no one thinks to carry is safety goggles,may save
your eyes in the woods.

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from Mathews347 wrote 5 years 8 weeks ago

i would just take the altoids

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