Video: The Micro Spey, Explained

A quick rundown of these hot new rods.

When I first heard the term micro spey, I was a bit incredulous. I thought someone was simply referring to a switch rod. But I was wrong. Typically, micro speys are longer (at 12.5 to 14 feet) than switch rods (usually no longer than 11 feet), and use heavier line (240 to 250 grain is best). Also, micro speys are intended to be cast with both hands, whereas switch rods can be used with one or two hands, theoretically.

Major rod companies, such as Sage, Redington, Scott, Thomas & Thomas, and Orvis are making micro-spey rods in the 2- to 5-weight range. When used correctly, these rods can open up a whole new world of casting and fishing possibilities on your local waters, by letting you utilize two-handed techniques once reserved for salmon and steelhead anglers. Plus, if you have limited backcasting space, you can still make big roll casts with a micro spey, keeping your fly out of the trees and in prime water.