Study: Pre-Treated Clothing May Work Better Than Insect Repellent

Spring is here, which means bloodsuckers and biters aren't far behind. But a new study conducted by the University of North Carolina suggests that pre-treated insect-repelling clothing is more effective at keeping bugs at bay than traditional bug sprays.

From this story (hat tip to T. Edward Nickens for the find) on Fibre2Fashion.com:
_A pilot study conducted by researchers at The University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health shows that a group of state water quality employees who wore clothing treated with a long-lasting insect repellent were bitten by ticks substantially less often than were their colleagues who used insect spray repellents and other preventive measures. The study, released March 11, in the peer-reviewed journal, Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases, reported that the incidence of tick attachments was reduced by 93 percent among workers wearing Insect Shield Repellent Apparel, compared to workers in similar environments who used spray repellents or other tick bite prevention methods.
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_Dr. Steve MeshnickTick-borne diseases are a significant concern for the millions of people who often work in tick-infested habitats. If not treated early, these diseases can lead to severe illness or even death, said Steve Meshnick, MD, PhD, UNC epidemiology professor and lead author of the study. Over the past two decades, the incidence of diseases such as Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever has been increasing. The apparel products also have been shown to repel mosquitoes, ants, flies, chiggers and midges (no-see-ums) through 70 launderings.

"The technology holds the promise of a safe, simple, and effective way to protect people from ticks and other insects," Meshnick said. "If further studies show similar results, the apparel could be used by people who are often outdoors for work or recreation or both. I can envision many uses around the world, including in developing countries to prevent malaria spread by mosquitoes."_

So do you think treated clothing is the wave of the future, or will there always be a bottle of bug dope in your tackle box, backpack or truck?