AZ Senator Draws Fire For Allegedly Pointing Handgun at Reporter

Here's one from the "Was It Really a Good Idea?" files. An Arizona state senator is drawing some metaphorical fire this week after allegedly pointing her handgun at a reporter's chest while showing off during an interview.

From this AP story:
_An Arizona state senator's handling of her gun is drawing criticism from a fellow lawmaker. An Arizona Republic story about Anthem Republican Lori Klein's carrying of a gun in her purse while at the Legislature said she showed off its laser sighting by pointing it at a reporter interviewing her in the Senate lounge. According to Klein, the gun has no safety but there was no danger because she didn't have her hand on the trigger. In an email to the Capitol Times reported by the Republic, Klein denied pointing the gun at the reporter and said he sat himself down in front of it. Democratic Sen. Steve Gallardo of Phoenix called for an ethics inquiry and said lawmakers should be prohibited from taking guns into the Senate.

Senator Klein has since denied she actually pointed the gun at the reporter's chest. From this story in the _East Valley Tribune:
A first-term state lawmaker denied Monday she deliberately pointed a loaded gun at a newspaper reporter during an interview at the state Senate. Sen. Lori Klein, R-Anthem, admitted in a statement she took her .380 Ruger out of its carrying case during an interview last month with Arizona Republic reporter Richard Ruelas in the lounge outside the Senate chamber. But Klein, who refused to comment, instead issued a statement saying that was done for the benefit of the photographer who wanted to see the gun and the laser sight -- and that Ruelas sat down in the path of the laser.
_The Republic refused to make Ruelas available. But he told KPNX-TV which, like the Republic, is owned by Gannett, that there was a separate incident, earlier in the interview, where she pointed the gun at his chest.

Ruelas said he did not think much of what had occurred at the time of the June interview. And he mentions it only briefly in a larger story published Sunday on the fact that Klein carries her weapon into the building. But the story gained national attention when picked up on the Internet. It also resurrected a debate over an unofficial policy that allows senators -- but no one else -- to carry their weapons into the building._

Either way, the incident has caused quite the kerfuffle. What do you think? No big deal or an absolute bone-headed stunt?