Gun Fight Friday: Remington 700 vs Kimber 8400 Montana

Last week the Savage 99 in .300 Savage narrowly edged out the .30/06 Remington 760 in a battle between two … Continued

httpswww.fieldandstream.comsitesfieldandstream.comfilesimport2014importBlogPostembedGF_RemKimber.jpg

Last week the Savage 99 in .300 Savage narrowly edged out the .30/06 Remington 760 in a battle between two classics of the eastern deer woods. This week we go West for another good matchup: a pair of bolt actions for the mountains–one old-school rifle, the other totally 21st century.

Steve Huey’s Remington 700

httpswww.fieldandstream.comsitesfieldandstream.comfilesimport2014importBlogPostembedGF_Remington700.jpg

The rifle started out life as a Remington 700 Classic, made in 1988, with a straight-comb stock and hooded front sight with rear ramp from the factory. I was shopping for a replacement for an ill-tempered .338 Winchester Magnum when I came upon this .35 Whelen. My requirements for an elk rifle were simple: shoot a heavy bullet for killing elk and have plenty of energy for a close-up defensive shot on big bears since I often hunted alone in Montana and Washington. Initially scoped with a Redfield Widefield 2-7X, it now wears a Leupold 3-9X40 with a heavy duplex reticle and CDS turret. I have taken quite a few elk and mule deer over the years with this rifle. My longest shot to date with this rifle was 308 measured yards on a bull elk. One shot and down. The 22-inch barrel and the attached Montana sling make it an easy carry in the timber or heavy brush. See you in elk country.”

Phil Traynor’s Kimber 8400

httpswww.fieldandstream.comsitesfieldandstream.comfilesimport2014importBlogPostembedGF_Kimber8400.jpg

“This is my backcountry hunting rifle, a Kimber 8400 Montana in .325 WSM. It wears a Leupold VX-3 3.5-10×50 scope with a Boone & Crockett reticle. This rifle is light enough to carry on mountain backpack hunts, flat-shooting enough for long shots, and packs enough punch for an unplanned bear encounter. Stainless steel and Kevlar/carbon fiber may not be as pretty as fancy walnut and blued steel, but it is also a lot easier to take care of when you are in a tent at the end of the day. The only downside is that the .325 WSM is versatile enough for all North American big game, negating the “need” for a safe full of guns.”

Which of these rifles you would prefer depends a little on how you view a rifle: Do you want the most efficient tool for the often demanding chore of backcountry hunting, or do you prefer a rifle with some tradition behind it?

Don’t forget to send us photos and stories of your favorite guns to FSgunnuts@gmail.com to be featured in an upcoming Gun Fight Friday.