Book Review: 'Make Every Shot Count' by J. Scott Olmsted

I believe we suffer from an overdose of shooting and hunting books, so when I took this one out of the box I emitted little shrieks of disgust and revulsion, much as I would upon encountering a venomous serpent, or Senator Chuck Schumer (D-NY). However, I'm wrong about something every 12 ½ years or so, and this was the occasion. It's a good book, and worth having.

J. Scott Olmsted is a former Marine, a lifelong hunter, NRA-certified rifle instructor, and editor-in-chief of American Hunter magazine. He has an admirable list of credentials, and has presented us with a short (258-page), readable book that is intended for beginning riflemen and big-game hunters. If you're a veteran, what he has to say will be old hat, but if you're a tyro it will be brand new, and if you listen to him you will save yourself an infinite amount of wasted effort, money, and blown opportunity.

Every Shot is divided into three parts: Before the Shot (picking rifle, scope, and ammo, and how it all works), On the Range (sighting in and practice), In the Field (how to shoot when you don't have a benchrest nearby, which is a dying art).

The information is broken up in brief chunks, much the same as Phiil Bourjaily and I did in The Total Gun Manual, and it's all good advice, meaning I agree with it. The only disappointment is the cartridge review, which strongly favors newer rounds, ignoring some of the really useful older ones. But that is a minor quibble. The price is $29.95, which is less than a box of some ammo, and if you're looking for a Christmas gift for a beginning shooter or a badly confused intermediate, here it is.

www.safaripress.com, 714-894-9080.