How Plastic Worms Make Sabiki Rigs Pain-Free

I've said it before and I'll say it again: Sometimes the most practical and useful fishing tips are so simple, you smack yourself in the head when you hear them as you try to figure out why you didn't think of them first. I learned one such trick fishing in Virginia with Captain Chris Eberwien last week. I won't spoil the trip because it's a "Hook Shots" in progress, but for now just know that part of it required jigging herring with Sabiki rigs.

Have you ever fished with a Sabiki? If so, did your ears end up pierced? Was there blood loss? If you're unfamiliar with the rigs, Sabikis have 6 tiny hooks dressed in Fish Skin or Mylar strung on one line. It looks like a school of teeny baitfish or shrimp when jigged, and shad, herring, pinfish, and goggle eyes are just a few bait species that go nuts over them.

Problem is, those tiny hooks are damn sharp and love to tangle. Get 3 or 4 rods rigged with Sabikis on a bouncing boat, and you've got a recipe for knotted messes and makeshift accunpuncture. So what does Eberwien do to avoid this chaos? He clips off little pieces of soft-plastic worms and sticks them on each hook, removing them only when the rigs are ready t be dropped in the water. Simple, effective, ingenious. Two days or running with Sabikis in the rod holders, not one Band-Aid involved.