More on the ELCAN

Here is more on the ELCAN DigitalHunter all-digital scope. The writer is both an extremely experienced shooter and a person … Continued

Here is more on the ELCAN DigitalHunter all-digital scope. The writer is both an extremely experienced shooter and a person who has far more electronic expertise than I do (Hell, King Charlemagne had more electronic expertise than I do.) as well as extensive experience with the ELCAN. He wishes to remain anonymous.

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“I have mixed feelings about this scope. On the one hand, it has features that are way beyond the capabilities of an optical sight. On the other hand it has serious limitations.

“Among the pros: It can store four reticles which can be programmed for different zero ranges or for different ballistic profiles. Some reticles have white or color components. I found a white crosshair intersection to be particularly useful against a dark background.

“Although it can be programmed for different ranges, it has no rangefinder, you have to have a separate means of determining distance.

“It has a ‘video out’ connector that allows an instructor to monitor the shooter’s sight picture in real time. For SWAT marksmen, this can also provide evidence. The ELCAN’s video gives you 10 seconds of recording, and you can program that into before-, during-, and after-the-shot segments.

“On the Day/Night model, infrared capability extends twilight performance. With an infrared light source, the ELCAN is night-capable.

“A power-save features puts the ELCAN into standby mode after it remains motionless for a user-set interval. The slightest movement brings it back on line instantly.

“Among the ‘cons’: Poor image quality compared to an optical scope. The NTSC format is the old low-res format [It can be switched to PAL]. An HDTV version would be a great improvement.

“You have to use lithium AA batteries to power the scope. Alkaline just won’t cut it, and cold still degrades the batteries’ performance.

“It’s big, bulky, and clumsy looking. It just doesn’t look right on a rifle, especially a sporting rifle.

“I applaud ELCAN for giving us a look at what is probably the future of shooting and hunting, but this technology is in the Model T stage and not ready for prime time.”