Would You Eat Insects?

CC image from Flickr

In scanning through the lists of food trends that inevitably pop up in January, one idea that consistently pops up is eating insects. In fact, this so-called "trend" has showed itself more and more often in recent years, almost as if food pundits are trying to will the western world into crunching into creepy, crawly bugs.

The argument behind the trend toward eating insects is based on the popular idea of sustainability. Protein from insects is better for the environment, and better for the body, than that from factory-farmed animals. Bug-friendly research claims 80 percent of the world's population already make insects an important part of their diet and if we Americans can get on board, the world will be saved from imminent doom.

Sorry folks. Don't count on me helping save the planet. I consider myself a pretty adventurous eater and am fairly strong-stomached. I've eaten bivalves sold by vendors from trays on a hot day along the Boshphorus and make Rocky Mountain Oysters a pretty regular addition to my diet. I like to think that I'll try about anything once.

Except insects.

I just can't get over the mental hurdle. However, I did find one product that I might try on a bet--Chapul Bars. Although they're made from crickets ground into flour, Chapul bars look like your common energy bars--that is, no legs or antennas sticking out to remind me of what I'm eating. Reviews on the Chapul site give high marks to both the taste and texture. By all accounts, they won't kill you. Still. They are made from bugs.

How about you? Are there any avid insect eaters among the Wild Chef gang?