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The Work Sharp Knife and Tool Sharpener Ken Onion Edition

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December 02, 2013

The Work Sharp Knife and Tool Sharpener Ken Onion Edition

By David E. Petzal

A number of years ago, Work Sharp, which is a division of Darex, set the cutlery world on its ear by introducing an electric belt sharpener that would put an edge on most anything in seconds, and without overheating the blade, tearing off steel, or baffling the user.

Now, Work Sharp has outdone itself by having custom knifemaker and designer Ken Onion put together an improved version that bears his name. The new Ken Onion Work Sharp has a more powerful, variable-speed motor, wider belts with better abrasive, a guide that lets you adjust your bevel from 15 degrees to 30 degrees, and upgrade kits that expand its already awe-inspiring capabilities. Using its full range of accessories, this tool can sharpen anything from a shovel to a scalpel.

Among its features is something I haven’t seen before—a work chart printed on heavy cardboard (also suitable for framing, in case you’re tired of your Vermeer or Lautrec) that shows you just how to proceed with all this technology. Let’s say you want to sharpen a hunting knife, so you look under “Hunting Knife” and below that you choose between “Haggered” (That’s how they spell it, and it’s the wrong word, but what the hell.) and “Dull.” Choose one of the two sets of directions  that follow and you get the angle and speed at which to sharpen, the progression of belts to use, and how many strokes you give the edge on each side.

Especially intriguing is the subcategory called “Bragging Rights,” below which appears “How sharp can you get?” and below that, “Ridiculous,” following which is a formula that will get your knife sharp enough to perform corneal surgery.

What Worksharp does not make much of, and should, is the fact that its system gives you a rolled, or Moran-style edge, which can only be gotten with a belt. The rolled edge is convex in cross section rather than flat, and is very strong and long lasting because it leaves more steel where the metal meets the meat. When I asked Worksharp why they didn’t make more of it, the answer was that not many people appreciate such a refinement. So be it. But now you do.

If your needs are more modest, there’s another Worksharp product that costs far less than the Ken Onion Sharpener (which is $150) and that is the Guided Field Sharpener 221, which is about all I ever use, and which is so good that I have three—one in the shop, one in the kitchen, and one with my hunting gear. It ‘s about the size of a large folding knife, offers five sharpening steps (of which I only use only two) and costs $34.95. It’s as foolproof in its own way as the Ken Onion Sharpener. 

Contact: Worksharptools.com

 

Comments (35)

Top Rated
All Comments
from Douglas wrote 19 weeks 4 days ago

After reading the review of the original Worksharp a couple years ago, I went and bought one.
No excuses for dull knives in my house.
Its easy to use and get replacement belts for.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 19 weeks 4 days ago

Bought one after your first report and have given three more as gifts. Have had no complaints from anyone except my mother-in-law as she wasn't used to using such a sharp knife in the kitchen. Haven't seen the GFS221 in the stores yet but will ask. Thanks for another good piece of advice.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RJ Arena wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

After your review a couple of years ago I bought one, liked it so much I started selling them in my store. I like the concept, simple and easy to use with great results. Now I am going to have to find a reason that my old one does not work to get the new one, maybe my yellow lab brought it outside and let my pit bull bury it, they have done things like that before.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from .30-06Hunter wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

I have the Field Sharpener and if it can work or me it will work for anyone. I am terrible at sharpening knives but this makes it easy. I finally bought one after I kept getting weird looks from the clerk at Sportsman's Warehouse when I was sharpening about three knives on the demo model they had. He kept reminding me that they sell them. I paid about $30 for it which was well worth it. I tried the belt model in the store and did not like it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

When David first recommended this sharpener, I purchased one, my Son liked it so well I gave it to him, my son-in -law liked the next one I bought so well i again made a gift. The last one I bought my wife's employee liked it so well he got it for Christmas a year ago. Guess I will buy myself one of the new models this year and only use it in the dead of the night.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

Wonderfull, I think.
Six months ago I bought the Worksharp and couldn't be happier, it is excellent.
I always thought the angles could be better. I hope I can upgrade mine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

My apologizes but. I look at sharpening a knife/tool the same way I look at marksmanship. If you rely on something to do the job. You are giving up some very simple fundamentals. If you can shoot just don't roll the blade and you will get a good edge.
I worked as a butcher and it is not Rocket Science.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

PS By what I mean roll the blade is picking up the back at the end of the stroke. Not maintaining a 15 degree angel.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from deadeyedick wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

I have the older model and it works just fine. Here is a bit of advice, throw those cheap walmart knives in the garbage and buy a really good set. You can't sharpen that junk no matter what you use. I buy my knives from the local meat market and they are great knives and with a little care will last a long long time. A dull knife is far more dangerous than a sharp one

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from deadeyedick wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

I did not mean to suggest that only walmart sells junk knives. Most retails department stores sell them also, and not all of those knives are bad It is mostly our wives that buy them because they look so good in thier litttle blocks sitting on the sideboard in the kitchen

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

Carl, I think it was Gandhi that said "a man's got to know his limitations."

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

After your previous recommendation I also bought one for myself, my son, and another friend. Also got two of the field models, and they are about all I use now. They certainly are all that you said they were and I have always been a fanatic knife sharpener. My favorite knives are still the old non-stainless high carbon steel ones. They may not look as cool but they are superior. Some of my kitchen knives are certainly over 100 years old and still going strong. I have pitched more than one stainless steel knife in the trash over the years. Yeah, Walmart does sell a lot of crap and I seldom if ever darken their doors.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

About freehand sharpening: I learned to do it but at the cost of a lot of knives whose edges I wrecked in the process. Doing a good job freehand is about like developing good penmanship; not everyone can learn. Randall used to sharpen all its knives on oilstones and came up with a perfect hairline-fine, dead even edge. I could not match that if my life depended on it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kudukid wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

I've always enjoyed the time spent putting an edge on a good knife by hand on a good Arkansas soft stone - preferably a very big stone.

Have the hard and translucent hard too but the translucent is really only good for sharpening razors and checking gold.
The soft stone will give an edge more than sharp enough for any outdoor or kitchen use. It's much cheaper as well.

Of all the kitchen cutlery this family has tried, the French Sabatier has had the best steel.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SL wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

Tom Warner said: " My favorite knives are still the old non-stainless high carbon steel ones. They may not look as cool but they are superior." I absolutely agree with this 100%! A stainless steel knife just does not hold an edge like a carbon steel knife. Just this season I resurrected an old German carbon steel knife that was inherited from an uncle. Decided to carry it instead of my usual stainless steel folding knife. Using the Work Sharp knife sharpener I put an incredible edge on it. Just this past weekend I killed one of my biggest bucks ever and had it go down in a location where I had NO choice but to skin and quarter it right where it fell. The 50 year old knife did an incredible job. It skinned and cut up the entire buck and still had a great edge left on it. If that isn't proof, I don't know what is. I sure know that my stainless steel knives went dull before I was half way thru skinning even a small deer.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SCBuilder66 wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

I make benchmade knives from Files and such. I am definitely buying one of these to set the bevels on my blades. I am currently using the GATCO system which does an amazing job, but I think this could seriously speed up the process.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

A word of caution on knife sharpeners....When you say "abrasion" you are saying metal will be taken off your knife. Butcher shop workers use their knives a lot, and only once in awhile do they remove steel. Most often they are using a tool like a leather strap, and merely "straightening" back the rolled over blade. Way too much steel gets taken off of sportsman's knives, and the knife ruined.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

What I meant by upgrade my Work Sharp is be able to add Ken Onions angle guide to mine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from O Garcia wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

how will the young ones operate this thing without an iPhone app?

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

SL: When it comes to knives I have long thought that we have sacrificed function and utility to cosmetics. Everything you mentioned regarding achieving a really good edge and holding that edge is completely true. Of course the HC steel has to be of high quality, which many are not. Appearance now takes precedence over usefulness. This is not to say that many stainless knives are not good ones,...they are, but they will not take and hold an edge the way a quality HC steel knife will. I have been somewhat of a knife freak most of my life, so I have had lots of time and experience to form my opinions. I think that many of the younger generation may have never even used a good HC steel knife. If you look around you can still find good ones.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

Don't let Del in KS get ahold of one of these. His machete is sharp enough to shave with from the old Work Sharp.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from SpringTex wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

its all about the lansky system, cant beat sharpening stones.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from elmer f. wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

first, i have to disagree with deadeyedick. ALMOST anything CAN be sharpened. its just much of the cheap junk out there, will not hold that edge for more than 10 stokes through a piece of meat. let alone hitting a bone, or some other hard object. the proper tool for junk, is a "knife steel". something you can rip chunks off from the "edge" to create burrs, that will rip through chunks of meat. constant "sharpening" with a steel is required. a good knife blade will hold its edge much longer than most people will believe possible. mainly because until you have a decent knife, you have no idea. its like many things in life. once you experience the real thing, what you thought was real, quickly is discarded. a good knife is a wonderful tool. something everyone should own. but at an appropriate time in their life. a good tool needs to be appreciated for what it is. not abused to see what it will take.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from SL wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

I for one wouldn't pass up any hunting knife if it were being given to me, be it cheap or expensive. Except of course a serrated knife. If there is anything more appalling than a serrated hunting knife, I don't know what it is! Serrated knives are for cutting bread, not for gutting, skinning or butchering game.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

Yes, what advantages serrated knives are supposed to have, I have not yet figured out. Anybody like them? If so, why? Neither have I doped out exactly what "tactical" is supposed to mean. Huh? Since it sounds vaguely military, I would assume that many guys might buy something because the word sounds kind of macho. But it sounds like BS to me.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from kudukid wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

tom warner:

Same thing goes for "surgical steel" - a meaningless term if ever there was one.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from SL wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

Be careful Tom! There is a whole mess of "tactical" everything loving people out there these days! LOL Pretty soon helmets and flak jackets will be standard hunting gear, along with the AR rifles of course. Even parachutes. People will fly over their hunting land and parachute right into their treestands. LOL Heck, they can't make it to their stands without ATV's these days, so parachuting from the sky is the next natural step for the modern day deer hunter! LOL The parachute cord will be made a little extra strong for hunting purposes since we don't want to lose any of the chubby hunters, you know the ones who wear the XXXL garments. LOL

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

SL,
If the sick, lame & lazy can't get to their stand via leather personnel carriers or ATVs, snowball's chance in Hell being able to parachute anywhere. Unless they use cargo 'chutes, there will be some tough landings sine the old T-10 max total jumper weight is 300 lbs and the new T-11 is 400 lbs. That would include clothing, rifle and lunch! Most sport 'chutes have a much lower rating , like 220 pounds or so.... For the super-sized, lunch might be a big ticket weight item?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

SL: You sound like a kindred spirit to me. Although ATV's have their place, its not in the wilderness. I have (mis)spent my life hoofing and paddling it to destinations as far from humanity as I can get, and have formed a rather low opinion of the modern nimrod armed with the vast array of gadgetry available to alleviate any and all effort if possible. However, you did slip up on this one, since you failed to mention the obvious next step; Unmanned Drones! We only need to figure out what armament they will use since Hellfire missiles seem a bit over-the-top and we don't want to waste any meat, do we? Death rays?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 5280Shooter wrote 19 weeks 1 day ago

As further testament to the power of a DEP recommendation, I too rushed out and bought the electric model after reading the first review. It has served me well and all my neighbors and friends are in awe of my ability to disappear into my workroom and reappear with a super sharp blade only a few minutes later. I'm not willing to give them any clues as to how this magic occurs. Now, I'm looking at the field model as I had to field dress a couple of whitetails back-to-back in November this year and my blade went dull in the middle of the whole thing and I had no way to get that blade going again out in the field. It was what I thought was a quality stainless blade that should hold an edge... another lesson learned.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SL wrote 19 weeks 1 day ago

WA, cargo chutes would definitely be the ticket for the big boys! We can put them in boxes and when they land they can just punch out the windows and they have an instant ground blind!

Tom, you are right about the drones. It amazes me that someone down in Texas hasn't come up with some sort of gutting contraption where the deer gets gutted without the hunter having to dirty his manicured hands. The butt-out tool seems to be the only gutting enhancement anyone has been able to come up with it so far. LOL

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RS08 wrote 19 weeks 18 hours ago

amflyer, thought it was josey wales who said a mans got to know his limitations. appropriate either way

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 19 weeks 16 hours ago

Inspector Callahan said it. Dirty Harry's boss was telling him he had never had to draw his gun in 30 years or something like that and Clint says " A man's got to know his limitations" and smiles. I just saw it for the zillionth time about a week ago.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 18 weeks 4 days ago

Variable motor was job one in perfecting this thing. Mine has one speed. Too fast. Wider belts with better abrasive sounds great, too. They wear out faster than they say they will, and they tend to curl too easily over the tip of the blades. You can round some tips if you're not careful before you get the hang of it. If you don't have one of these, it should be worth every extra penny to get this new upgraded version.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 10 weeks 3 days ago

I am happy they upgraded the works sharp as the original model was not getting an acute enough angle on the bevels,16 or 15 degrees is perfect for some of my blades. So this sharpener is now on my want list, and the old skinnier belts will run on the new version. My chef brother and Dad will want an upgrade since I bought both of them the original version.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Comment

from O Garcia wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

how will the young ones operate this thing without an iPhone app?

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

My apologizes but. I look at sharpening a knife/tool the same way I look at marksmanship. If you rely on something to do the job. You are giving up some very simple fundamentals. If you can shoot just don't roll the blade and you will get a good edge.
I worked as a butcher and it is not Rocket Science.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

Yes, what advantages serrated knives are supposed to have, I have not yet figured out. Anybody like them? If so, why? Neither have I doped out exactly what "tactical" is supposed to mean. Huh? Since it sounds vaguely military, I would assume that many guys might buy something because the word sounds kind of macho. But it sounds like BS to me.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

SL: You sound like a kindred spirit to me. Although ATV's have their place, its not in the wilderness. I have (mis)spent my life hoofing and paddling it to destinations as far from humanity as I can get, and have formed a rather low opinion of the modern nimrod armed with the vast array of gadgetry available to alleviate any and all effort if possible. However, you did slip up on this one, since you failed to mention the obvious next step; Unmanned Drones! We only need to figure out what armament they will use since Hellfire missiles seem a bit over-the-top and we don't want to waste any meat, do we? Death rays?

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from .30-06Hunter wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

I have the Field Sharpener and if it can work or me it will work for anyone. I am terrible at sharpening knives but this makes it easy. I finally bought one after I kept getting weird looks from the clerk at Sportsman's Warehouse when I was sharpening about three knives on the demo model they had. He kept reminding me that they sell them. I paid about $30 for it which was well worth it. I tried the belt model in the store and did not like it.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

When David first recommended this sharpener, I purchased one, my Son liked it so well I gave it to him, my son-in -law liked the next one I bought so well i again made a gift. The last one I bought my wife's employee liked it so well he got it for Christmas a year ago. Guess I will buy myself one of the new models this year and only use it in the dead of the night.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

SL: When it comes to knives I have long thought that we have sacrificed function and utility to cosmetics. Everything you mentioned regarding achieving a really good edge and holding that edge is completely true. Of course the HC steel has to be of high quality, which many are not. Appearance now takes precedence over usefulness. This is not to say that many stainless knives are not good ones,...they are, but they will not take and hold an edge the way a quality HC steel knife will. I have been somewhat of a knife freak most of my life, so I have had lots of time and experience to form my opinions. I think that many of the younger generation may have never even used a good HC steel knife. If you look around you can still find good ones.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

Don't let Del in KS get ahold of one of these. His machete is sharp enough to shave with from the old Work Sharp.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from elmer f. wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

first, i have to disagree with deadeyedick. ALMOST anything CAN be sharpened. its just much of the cheap junk out there, will not hold that edge for more than 10 stokes through a piece of meat. let alone hitting a bone, or some other hard object. the proper tool for junk, is a "knife steel". something you can rip chunks off from the "edge" to create burrs, that will rip through chunks of meat. constant "sharpening" with a steel is required. a good knife blade will hold its edge much longer than most people will believe possible. mainly because until you have a decent knife, you have no idea. its like many things in life. once you experience the real thing, what you thought was real, quickly is discarded. a good knife is a wonderful tool. something everyone should own. but at an appropriate time in their life. a good tool needs to be appreciated for what it is. not abused to see what it will take.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from kudukid wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

tom warner:

Same thing goes for "surgical steel" - a meaningless term if ever there was one.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from SL wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

Be careful Tom! There is a whole mess of "tactical" everything loving people out there these days! LOL Pretty soon helmets and flak jackets will be standard hunting gear, along with the AR rifles of course. Even parachutes. People will fly over their hunting land and parachute right into their treestands. LOL Heck, they can't make it to their stands without ATV's these days, so parachuting from the sky is the next natural step for the modern day deer hunter! LOL The parachute cord will be made a little extra strong for hunting purposes since we don't want to lose any of the chubby hunters, you know the ones who wear the XXXL garments. LOL

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Douglas wrote 19 weeks 4 days ago

After reading the review of the original Worksharp a couple years ago, I went and bought one.
No excuses for dull knives in my house.
Its easy to use and get replacement belts for.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tom-Tom wrote 19 weeks 4 days ago

Bought one after your first report and have given three more as gifts. Have had no complaints from anyone except my mother-in-law as she wasn't used to using such a sharp knife in the kitchen. Haven't seen the GFS221 in the stores yet but will ask. Thanks for another good piece of advice.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RJ Arena wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

After your review a couple of years ago I bought one, liked it so much I started selling them in my store. I like the concept, simple and easy to use with great results. Now I am going to have to find a reason that my old one does not work to get the new one, maybe my yellow lab brought it outside and let my pit bull bury it, they have done things like that before.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

Wonderfull, I think.
Six months ago I bought the Worksharp and couldn't be happier, it is excellent.
I always thought the angles could be better. I hope I can upgrade mine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

PS By what I mean roll the blade is picking up the back at the end of the stroke. Not maintaining a 15 degree angel.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from deadeyedick wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

I have the older model and it works just fine. Here is a bit of advice, throw those cheap walmart knives in the garbage and buy a really good set. You can't sharpen that junk no matter what you use. I buy my knives from the local meat market and they are great knives and with a little care will last a long long time. A dull knife is far more dangerous than a sharp one

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from deadeyedick wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

I did not mean to suggest that only walmart sells junk knives. Most retails department stores sell them also, and not all of those knives are bad It is mostly our wives that buy them because they look so good in thier litttle blocks sitting on the sideboard in the kitchen

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

Carl, I think it was Gandhi that said "a man's got to know his limitations."

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from tom warner wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

After your previous recommendation I also bought one for myself, my son, and another friend. Also got two of the field models, and they are about all I use now. They certainly are all that you said they were and I have always been a fanatic knife sharpener. My favorite knives are still the old non-stainless high carbon steel ones. They may not look as cool but they are superior. Some of my kitchen knives are certainly over 100 years old and still going strong. I have pitched more than one stainless steel knife in the trash over the years. Yeah, Walmart does sell a lot of crap and I seldom if ever darken their doors.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from davidpetzal wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

About freehand sharpening: I learned to do it but at the cost of a lot of knives whose edges I wrecked in the process. Doing a good job freehand is about like developing good penmanship; not everyone can learn. Randall used to sharpen all its knives on oilstones and came up with a perfect hairline-fine, dead even edge. I could not match that if my life depended on it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from kudukid wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

I've always enjoyed the time spent putting an edge on a good knife by hand on a good Arkansas soft stone - preferably a very big stone.

Have the hard and translucent hard too but the translucent is really only good for sharpening razors and checking gold.
The soft stone will give an edge more than sharp enough for any outdoor or kitchen use. It's much cheaper as well.

Of all the kitchen cutlery this family has tried, the French Sabatier has had the best steel.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SL wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

Tom Warner said: " My favorite knives are still the old non-stainless high carbon steel ones. They may not look as cool but they are superior." I absolutely agree with this 100%! A stainless steel knife just does not hold an edge like a carbon steel knife. Just this season I resurrected an old German carbon steel knife that was inherited from an uncle. Decided to carry it instead of my usual stainless steel folding knife. Using the Work Sharp knife sharpener I put an incredible edge on it. Just this past weekend I killed one of my biggest bucks ever and had it go down in a location where I had NO choice but to skin and quarter it right where it fell. The 50 year old knife did an incredible job. It skinned and cut up the entire buck and still had a great edge left on it. If that isn't proof, I don't know what is. I sure know that my stainless steel knives went dull before I was half way thru skinning even a small deer.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SCBuilder66 wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

I make benchmade knives from Files and such. I am definitely buying one of these to set the bevels on my blades. I am currently using the GATCO system which does an amazing job, but I think this could seriously speed up the process.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Dangle wrote 19 weeks 3 days ago

A word of caution on knife sharpeners....When you say "abrasion" you are saying metal will be taken off your knife. Butcher shop workers use their knives a lot, and only once in awhile do they remove steel. Most often they are using a tool like a leather strap, and merely "straightening" back the rolled over blade. Way too much steel gets taken off of sportsman's knives, and the knife ruined.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

What I meant by upgrade my Work Sharp is be able to add Ken Onions angle guide to mine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SpringTex wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

its all about the lansky system, cant beat sharpening stones.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SL wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

I for one wouldn't pass up any hunting knife if it were being given to me, be it cheap or expensive. Except of course a serrated knife. If there is anything more appalling than a serrated hunting knife, I don't know what it is! Serrated knives are for cutting bread, not for gutting, skinning or butchering game.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 19 weeks 2 days ago

SL,
If the sick, lame & lazy can't get to their stand via leather personnel carriers or ATVs, snowball's chance in Hell being able to parachute anywhere. Unless they use cargo 'chutes, there will be some tough landings sine the old T-10 max total jumper weight is 300 lbs and the new T-11 is 400 lbs. That would include clothing, rifle and lunch! Most sport 'chutes have a much lower rating , like 220 pounds or so.... For the super-sized, lunch might be a big ticket weight item?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 5280Shooter wrote 19 weeks 1 day ago

As further testament to the power of a DEP recommendation, I too rushed out and bought the electric model after reading the first review. It has served me well and all my neighbors and friends are in awe of my ability to disappear into my workroom and reappear with a super sharp blade only a few minutes later. I'm not willing to give them any clues as to how this magic occurs. Now, I'm looking at the field model as I had to field dress a couple of whitetails back-to-back in November this year and my blade went dull in the middle of the whole thing and I had no way to get that blade going again out in the field. It was what I thought was a quality stainless blade that should hold an edge... another lesson learned.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from SL wrote 19 weeks 1 day ago

WA, cargo chutes would definitely be the ticket for the big boys! We can put them in boxes and when they land they can just punch out the windows and they have an instant ground blind!

Tom, you are right about the drones. It amazes me that someone down in Texas hasn't come up with some sort of gutting contraption where the deer gets gutted without the hunter having to dirty his manicured hands. The butt-out tool seems to be the only gutting enhancement anyone has been able to come up with it so far. LOL

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RS08 wrote 19 weeks 18 hours ago

amflyer, thought it was josey wales who said a mans got to know his limitations. appropriate either way

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Tim Platt wrote 19 weeks 16 hours ago

Inspector Callahan said it. Dirty Harry's boss was telling him he had never had to draw his gun in 30 years or something like that and Clint says " A man's got to know his limitations" and smiles. I just saw it for the zillionth time about a week ago.

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from shane wrote 18 weeks 4 days ago

Variable motor was job one in perfecting this thing. Mine has one speed. Too fast. Wider belts with better abrasive sounds great, too. They wear out faster than they say they will, and they tend to curl too easily over the tip of the blades. You can round some tips if you're not careful before you get the hang of it. If you don't have one of these, it should be worth every extra penny to get this new upgraded version.

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from Drew McClure wrote 10 weeks 3 days ago

I am happy they upgraded the works sharp as the original model was not getting an acute enough angle on the bevels,16 or 15 degrees is perfect for some of my blades. So this sharpener is now on my want list, and the old skinnier belts will run on the new version. My chef brother and Dad will want an upgrade since I bought both of them the original version.

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