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Q:
When people shoot deer with a bow, and wait to find it the next day, wouldn't you think the meat would rot?

Question by rezhunter81. Uploaded on March 12, 2011

Answers (13)

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from antlercrazy wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Not really, it depends on the temperature or where you shot it. The only thing you would have to worry about would be a gut shot, coyotes, and warm temperatures.

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from upnorthmn wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

ive lost one deer to coyotes in the 10 years ive been bow hunting, its the warm weather i worry about more. use a large cutting broadhead and focus on good shot placement and it usally isnt an issue

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from country road wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Unless it is early in the season and warm, you should be able to at least get the hams and backstraps. Unfortunately, sometimes all the hunters care about is getting the antlers.

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from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

If you make a good shot you shouldn't have to wait till morning, especially with a rifle. It never ceases to amaze me when they shoot a deer with a rifle in the middle of the afternoon and then are looking around the woods with a flashlight looking for the deer. I think I may be able to make some money running a school teaching people how to shoot.
We have a "deer ranch" close here and last year the owner said a guy came to "hunt" with a bow and film the hunt. After filming him shooting the deer with a bow,turn off the camera, shoot at the deer 3 more times with a rifle, finally finding the deer and then draging the dead deer through the woods to get the proper angles and shots of the "hunter" recovering the deer the "hunt" was a big production. The owner was amazed but the guy paid big bucks to make the video. I wonder how many times we are duped like this on the Outdoor Channel ?

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from Montana wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Last fall my friend shot a mule deer buck right at dark with his bow, it was supposed to be in the mid 50s that night so we looked for it until midnight. Didn't find it until 7 the next morning when it was 75. Wasn't rotten at all. Of course in a perfect world your critter drops right there and you get it gutted well before dark.

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from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Sarge you crack me up, those 400 lb "deer ranch" deer can take a lick, what is funny is when watching that type of show the first thing people say is "What a Monster." I hate to admit how warm early bow and muzzle loading can be in Arkansas, sweating buckets of camp beer in the stand is a bummer, I got a lot of slack from the Old school guys for wearing shorts, but being comfortable out there keeps on stand longer. Laying deer quarters in sloshy ice is not ideal, but it keeps them from spoiling.

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from seadog wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

It all depends on the weather. Here in Florida, we have a pretty short window--need to get that meat on ice!

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from NHshtr wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Warm weather usually isn't a problem her in NH. Nights during bow season are still chilly. coyotes are the big problem if leaving a deer overnight.

A few years ago, a nice 5 pointer was rifle shot around dusk by one of our young hunters. He didn't call for help tracking until it was dark. We searched for hours in the dark, but no luck. The next morning we started again at dark and about sunrise we found the head and one front leg. The rest was mostly skeleton. The coyotes had a feed in the relatively short time we were back at camp.

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from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

All the better reason to hunt mornings. Unless you gut shot the deer it should have no effect on the meat. Sarge is correct though. Bow, rifle, handgun, shotgun or muzzle loader. If you make the correct shot you don't have to wait even 10 minutes, yes there are times when something goes totally wrong while deer hunting. But for the most part unless you rush the shot,don't follow through with the shot or are just under skilled with your shooting abilities. There is really no reason or excuse for making a poor shot that would require waiting hours or over night to find a "WOUNDED" animal. We owe it to the animal to take the proper shot for a clean harvest

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from RES1956 wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Sometimes, we all make bad shots. If you haven't your lying or have not been hunting long. Down here in Alabama, if a deer is not found until the next morning, be prepared to find a boned out carcass and have a saw ready to cut off the horns. Coyotes are worse than warm weather and will help you in packing out your kill, one bellyfull at a time. Like one of the previous posters, I really like shooting my deer in the morning

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from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Deer that lay dead all night taste like crap. Count on it. I highly recommend shooting deer in a vital area so they drop within 100 yards. Get them fresh and they are delicious.

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from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

RES1956,
I used to go to Alabama and hunt with Davy Allison before he got killed and I shot a deer through the lungs and it traveled about 100 yards in planted pines and I didn't find it for about 3 hours. When I got to it the coyotes had eaten almost all of the hams and loins. That is why now everything I shoot is through the shoulders high. I want to watch them drop. I couldn't believe that the coyotes would get on your kill that quick. Leave one over night and like you say it will be gone, maybe they will even drag the carcess away rack and all.

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from Keith Costley wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

It is important to field dress a deer after the harvest as soon as possible. And sometimes that "as soon as possible" occurs the following day. I am always a little uncomfortable of field dressing and eating a deer that I tracked and retrieved a day later; however, it all depends on the weather and how cool it is.

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from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

If you make a good shot you shouldn't have to wait till morning, especially with a rifle. It never ceases to amaze me when they shoot a deer with a rifle in the middle of the afternoon and then are looking around the woods with a flashlight looking for the deer. I think I may be able to make some money running a school teaching people how to shoot.
We have a "deer ranch" close here and last year the owner said a guy came to "hunt" with a bow and film the hunt. After filming him shooting the deer with a bow,turn off the camera, shoot at the deer 3 more times with a rifle, finally finding the deer and then draging the dead deer through the woods to get the proper angles and shots of the "hunter" recovering the deer the "hunt" was a big production. The owner was amazed but the guy paid big bucks to make the video. I wonder how many times we are duped like this on the Outdoor Channel ?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Sarge you crack me up, those 400 lb "deer ranch" deer can take a lick, what is funny is when watching that type of show the first thing people say is "What a Monster." I hate to admit how warm early bow and muzzle loading can be in Arkansas, sweating buckets of camp beer in the stand is a bummer, I got a lot of slack from the Old school guys for wearing shorts, but being comfortable out there keeps on stand longer. Laying deer quarters in sloshy ice is not ideal, but it keeps them from spoiling.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from deerhunterrick wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

All the better reason to hunt mornings. Unless you gut shot the deer it should have no effect on the meat. Sarge is correct though. Bow, rifle, handgun, shotgun or muzzle loader. If you make the correct shot you don't have to wait even 10 minutes, yes there are times when something goes totally wrong while deer hunting. But for the most part unless you rush the shot,don't follow through with the shot or are just under skilled with your shooting abilities. There is really no reason or excuse for making a poor shot that would require waiting hours or over night to find a "WOUNDED" animal. We owe it to the animal to take the proper shot for a clean harvest

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from antlercrazy wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Not really, it depends on the temperature or where you shot it. The only thing you would have to worry about would be a gut shot, coyotes, and warm temperatures.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from upnorthmn wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

ive lost one deer to coyotes in the 10 years ive been bow hunting, its the warm weather i worry about more. use a large cutting broadhead and focus on good shot placement and it usally isnt an issue

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Unless it is early in the season and warm, you should be able to at least get the hams and backstraps. Unfortunately, sometimes all the hunters care about is getting the antlers.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Montana wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Last fall my friend shot a mule deer buck right at dark with his bow, it was supposed to be in the mid 50s that night so we looked for it until midnight. Didn't find it until 7 the next morning when it was 75. Wasn't rotten at all. Of course in a perfect world your critter drops right there and you get it gutted well before dark.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from seadog wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

It all depends on the weather. Here in Florida, we have a pretty short window--need to get that meat on ice!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from NHshtr wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Warm weather usually isn't a problem her in NH. Nights during bow season are still chilly. coyotes are the big problem if leaving a deer overnight.

A few years ago, a nice 5 pointer was rifle shot around dusk by one of our young hunters. He didn't call for help tracking until it was dark. We searched for hours in the dark, but no luck. The next morning we started again at dark and about sunrise we found the head and one front leg. The rest was mostly skeleton. The coyotes had a feed in the relatively short time we were back at camp.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Sometimes, we all make bad shots. If you haven't your lying or have not been hunting long. Down here in Alabama, if a deer is not found until the next morning, be prepared to find a boned out carcass and have a saw ready to cut off the horns. Coyotes are worse than warm weather and will help you in packing out your kill, one bellyfull at a time. Like one of the previous posters, I really like shooting my deer in the morning

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

Deer that lay dead all night taste like crap. Count on it. I highly recommend shooting deer in a vital area so they drop within 100 yards. Get them fresh and they are delicious.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 5 weeks ago

RES1956,
I used to go to Alabama and hunt with Davy Allison before he got killed and I shot a deer through the lungs and it traveled about 100 yards in planted pines and I didn't find it for about 3 hours. When I got to it the coyotes had eaten almost all of the hams and loins. That is why now everything I shoot is through the shoulders high. I want to watch them drop. I couldn't believe that the coyotes would get on your kill that quick. Leave one over night and like you say it will be gone, maybe they will even drag the carcess away rack and all.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Keith Costley wrote 3 years 4 weeks ago

It is important to field dress a deer after the harvest as soon as possible. And sometimes that "as soon as possible" occurs the following day. I am always a little uncomfortable of field dressing and eating a deer that I tracked and retrieved a day later; however, it all depends on the weather and how cool it is.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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