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Q:
I was rummaging through old fishing gear in the garage today and came across an old warped fly rod case. I popped it open and rediscovered an old fly rod given to me a long time ago. I had completely forgotten about it as I don't really do much fly fishing. Anyhow, it looks like a cool old rod and I wanted to take it out on the water. My question is: How do I determine what line weight to buy? It says Garcia, "8 1/2' dry fly action. Use C-GBG-GBF" And the number 2638. Any ideas?

Question by gumby. Uploaded on May 05, 2011

Answers (6)

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from buckhunter wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Hard to say what weight line you should use by looking at the numbers. Take the rod to a fly shop and they can tell you.

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from Sayfu wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

The fly shop will probably tell you to cast a line with it and see how it feels with that line. You'd have to be a good fly caster to do that. They'd have to take the time to do it, and have several reels with wt. lines on them. I'd guess off the top it was a 6, 7. or 8 wt. They made very few lesser line wts. in those days, and I'd also guess it is a glass rod. I had the neatest chart in a back room at my flyshop years back with a rod attachment at the side that would lay the rod out parallel to the floor, and it had 2 different wts. you would hook to the rod tip. A heavier wt. for graphite, and a lesser wt. for bamboo, and glass. The wt. would bend the rod down into a chart that would indicate the proper line wt. It was a Cortland chart, and I've talked to the Cortland folks, and they say it is no longer. Wish I had kept it. I'd have it up in my fly fishing room, if I could find room. And if it is for sentimental reasons you want to learn on the rod, go for it. Otherwise there are inexpensive graphite rods made today, that are far superior to that rod. If it is glass, or bamboo, and I think it is glass, it will be heavy, and very "sloppy", lots of flex, and hard to learn with.

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from Sayfu wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

y shop will probably tell you to cast a line with it and see how it feels with that line. You'd have to be a good fly casteThe flr to do that. They'd have to take the time to do it, and have several reels with wt. lines on them. I'd guess off the top it was a 6, 7. or 8 wt. They made very few lesser line wts. in those days, and I'd also guess it is a glass rod. I had the neatest chart in a back room at my flyshop years back with a rod attachment at the side that would lay the rod out parallel to the floor, and it had 2 different wts. you would hook to the rod tip. A heavier wt. for graphite, and a lesser wt. for bamboo, and glass. The wt. would bend the rod down into a chart that would indicate the proper line wt. It was a Cortland chart, and I've talked to the Cortland folks, and they say it is no longer. Wish I had kept it. I'd have it up in my fly fishing room, if I could find room. And if it is for sentimental reasons you want to learn on the rod, go for it. Otherwise there are inexpensive graphite rods made today, that are far superior to that rod. If it is glass, or bamboo, and I think it is glass, it will be heavy, and very "sloppy", lots of flex, and hard to learn with.

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from Sayfu wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Doesn't this friggin site know how to make it work?

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from gumby wrote 2 years 49 weeks ago

Thanks. I'll probably go out and get some 6 weight, and try not to spend so much. Buying good fly line isn't like buying some 6 pound mono for crappie is it?
Honestly, all I've ever fly fished with are the ones pre-spooled at the family fishing cabin. They're probably a good 30 years old. Someone seems to always keep fresh line on them though. I'd guess they're 5 or 6 weight, because the creeks are small and so are the brook trout there. They don't notice my ineptness however and seem to eat any fly I chuck at 'em. In to the frying pan they go.

In the process of learning to fly fish, I've discovered that I enjoy tying flies almost as much as I enjoy the fishing. Thanks for the tips.

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from Sayfu wrote 2 years 49 weeks ago

I'm not a frying pan guy with trout..not if they are native fish. Sounds like you could just put monofilament on a reel, and creek fish with it.

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from buckhunter wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Hard to say what weight line you should use by looking at the numbers. Take the rod to a fly shop and they can tell you.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

The fly shop will probably tell you to cast a line with it and see how it feels with that line. You'd have to be a good fly caster to do that. They'd have to take the time to do it, and have several reels with wt. lines on them. I'd guess off the top it was a 6, 7. or 8 wt. They made very few lesser line wts. in those days, and I'd also guess it is a glass rod. I had the neatest chart in a back room at my flyshop years back with a rod attachment at the side that would lay the rod out parallel to the floor, and it had 2 different wts. you would hook to the rod tip. A heavier wt. for graphite, and a lesser wt. for bamboo, and glass. The wt. would bend the rod down into a chart that would indicate the proper line wt. It was a Cortland chart, and I've talked to the Cortland folks, and they say it is no longer. Wish I had kept it. I'd have it up in my fly fishing room, if I could find room. And if it is for sentimental reasons you want to learn on the rod, go for it. Otherwise there are inexpensive graphite rods made today, that are far superior to that rod. If it is glass, or bamboo, and I think it is glass, it will be heavy, and very "sloppy", lots of flex, and hard to learn with.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

y shop will probably tell you to cast a line with it and see how it feels with that line. You'd have to be a good fly casteThe flr to do that. They'd have to take the time to do it, and have several reels with wt. lines on them. I'd guess off the top it was a 6, 7. or 8 wt. They made very few lesser line wts. in those days, and I'd also guess it is a glass rod. I had the neatest chart in a back room at my flyshop years back with a rod attachment at the side that would lay the rod out parallel to the floor, and it had 2 different wts. you would hook to the rod tip. A heavier wt. for graphite, and a lesser wt. for bamboo, and glass. The wt. would bend the rod down into a chart that would indicate the proper line wt. It was a Cortland chart, and I've talked to the Cortland folks, and they say it is no longer. Wish I had kept it. I'd have it up in my fly fishing room, if I could find room. And if it is for sentimental reasons you want to learn on the rod, go for it. Otherwise there are inexpensive graphite rods made today, that are far superior to that rod. If it is glass, or bamboo, and I think it is glass, it will be heavy, and very "sloppy", lots of flex, and hard to learn with.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 50 weeks ago

Doesn't this friggin site know how to make it work?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from gumby wrote 2 years 49 weeks ago

Thanks. I'll probably go out and get some 6 weight, and try not to spend so much. Buying good fly line isn't like buying some 6 pound mono for crappie is it?
Honestly, all I've ever fly fished with are the ones pre-spooled at the family fishing cabin. They're probably a good 30 years old. Someone seems to always keep fresh line on them though. I'd guess they're 5 or 6 weight, because the creeks are small and so are the brook trout there. They don't notice my ineptness however and seem to eat any fly I chuck at 'em. In to the frying pan they go.

In the process of learning to fly fish, I've discovered that I enjoy tying flies almost as much as I enjoy the fishing. Thanks for the tips.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sayfu wrote 2 years 49 weeks ago

I'm not a frying pan guy with trout..not if they are native fish. Sounds like you could just put monofilament on a reel, and creek fish with it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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