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Q:
Any reviews on the Remington Model 7600 pump? Just got one in 280 cal. and cant wait to shoot it. What grain/brand will be the most accurate for 280? Whats the max range on this gun? etc specs please. Or a link to a site with these specs?

Question by hunterkid94. Uploaded on October 14, 2010

Answers (25)

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from whitetailfreek wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

7600's are great guns and once you find the right load for it, it will probably be a tack driver.

As far as the .280 Remington goes, its a great round as well. Has all the benefits of flat shooting like the .270 Winchester, but still carries more punch like the .30/06 Springfield. Its a great compromise between the two cartridges it came from.

I am a big fan of 7mms.

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from whitetailfreek wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

BTW, a 140 grain bullet is a good size overall for the .280 Remington. Just out of basic Remington Core-Lokts, you still have enough kinetic energy to kill a deer out to 500 yards, if you are able to keep it in the vitals. At 200 yards, you have just shy of 2,000 ft. lbs of energy.

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from hunterkid94 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

If I bought it, it would be a 270. But it was a gift from my dad. Its light, steady, and I hear its reliable and accurate. Its one of the best gifts Ive ever got.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

whitetailfreek +1 and I'm going to leave it as that. But my question to you and everyone else, why in Gods Green Apples did you buy something yo don't know didly squat about the 280 yet alone the 7600?!?

Before I went to Alaska, I did my very own research on what gun and cartridge to get and fortunately I lucked out with the exception of the scope. The scope had an allergic reaction to the recoil of my 250 Grain Noslers loaded at 2825ish fps! The remedy was a Leupold 3x9x40 VariX-II and still going strong as if it was brand new except for a few scratches!

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

By the way

For the 7600 stay with moderate loads as you would in a Semiautomatic.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from LesserSon wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

I don't currently own anything between a .243 and a .30/06, but I'd be tickled to get a .280 as a gift. All I've read on it indicates a subtle performance edge on the .270, though you'll pay extra for the ammo compared to more popular cartidges like .270.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

I think you will be pleased with your .280 Rem. A 140 or 150 Core Lokt should kill any deer sized game most efficiently. Yes, you don't want to get too radical with any handloads for that 7600 since the autoloaders and pumps do not have the same leverage to open a sticking bolt or extract a stuck case due to a little overpressure.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

Don't know who gave a minus to Clay or WAM for offering good advice on reloading for the .280 Rem for a M760 but I plused them to equal things out. I reload for .270 and .280 and consider them ballistic twins but would not shoot my reloads in anything but a bolt action or a strong single shot. I suppose this will rate me a minus also, I don't care.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Treestand wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

In the World of Jack O'Connor if I hade to chose
between a .270 or a .280 the .280 is his pick.
you have recived good Info, stay with factory ammo
and a good scope you will be just fine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

My brother-in-law has a 760 in .270. It shoots very well but kicks like the proverbial bay mule. If I didn't already have a 7mm Remington magnum, I'd likely have a .280.

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from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

Thanks ishawooa Your are a Gentleman & Scholar of Uncommon Sportsmanship quality!

Nothing wrong with the 280 Remington, it's only .5mm larger in caliber than the 6.5-06 and as long as the Shooter keeps the bullet weights at or below 162 grain, they will get phenomenal performance! For deer both Whitetail and Mule Deer, I would use a 120 grain!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

Clay, 120 in a .28 caliber? Isn't that kind of light? I know you're getting speed and flat trajectory, but what about penetration, excessive expansion, etc? Usually those light for caliber bullets are intended for varmints and the like. I tried 145's or something similar in my 7mm mag once and decided I didn't like wasting meat like that.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from PAShooter wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

My son started out with a 788 Rem .243 at age 12. He 5 deer with that gun, every one he pulled the trigger on. At age 16 I replaced it with a Rem 7600 30-06. He prefers the pump to the bolt with the type of hunting we do. The gun shoots under 1" groups. He has had great success on whitetail with 150 grn. bullets (DRT). He now refuses a gift of a new Sako because of his fondness of the 7600 for the past ten years saying he wouldn't use it. Many people insist that the 7600 kicks hard but my son says not and he weighs about 140#. I guess this "recoil" thing differs with everyone.
120 grn bullets in a 7mm for deer are fine if they have the proper construction. Barnes,Nosler, and others make bullets that will hold together. It certainly would make a nice flat shooting rifle for deer sized game. Fellow reloaders have the advantage in tailor made rounds.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

@ ishawooa

Someone has been sniping at me for several weeks now with the -1's, regardless of posting. I'm rather amused at their infantile behavior.

My brother gifted my son a LNIB 7600 in .35 Whelen last fall and you would think he had just given him an Ed Brown custom! Shoots the 250 grainers as well!

Those 7600's seem to shoot hard with that shotgun stock, but to each his own. My 700 BDL shoots hard enough. The .280 would be on my short list of calibers if I could only have one rifle, although it would be hard to pass a .30-06. The advantage to the .280 is a slightly larger selection of heavier .284" bullets over the beloved .270 Win.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

007

My favorite 30-06 load for Mule deer is a Hornady 130 grain with 54 grains of IMR4064. I've watched several Caribou taken by a Father and Son with 270's with 130's take Caribou all bang flops. The 120 in 7mm/280 is best used in the southwest for it's flat trajectory and knockdown and known a many 7mm Rem Mag shooters use it as well. If I thought for one microsecond that the 280 with a 120 would be a problem, I would have known it. 120 works fantastic on both Whitetail and Mule Deer with plenty of steam to knock there +ick in the dirt!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

PS

This has definitely has been a no "BS" moment!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

blackdawgz

What do you think we should do to this punk kid!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

Darn, blackdawgz +1 for'ya!

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from cmikles1 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

You're in luck. This months issue of Rifle magazine has an article about pump rifles. The author spends a lot of time on the 760 and 7600.

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from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

The 76oo is an a highly accurate pump rifle. I have had not had a 7600, but have had several 760's over the years. The 280 is one of my favorite cartridges and for some reason that I can't explain dosen't kick as bad as a .270. You wanted to know the range. You can shoot just about as far as you want to shoot. Seriously if you want it is a 400 yard whitetail rifle. I found the Hornady 139 grain Interlock SST was a fine bullet for whitetails.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

hunterkid,
I have an old 760 rem pump chambered for '06 and as Sarge01 said I can't explain why it is a softer shooter than my Savage '06 other than a proper stock fit.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

cmiklel1,
can't wait to get my mag to read it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

Clay, agreed, straightforward info, thanks. I'm starting to drift more and more into the Elmer Keith camp and heavy-for-caliber bullets.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from UpChuck wrote 3 years 24 weeks ago

hunterkid94,

Congratulations on your acquisition. To answer your questions, every gun is different, so this is only a guideline to saving you money in ammo experimentation. If your gun has a 1/9" twist barrel you will generally be able to shoot 140, 150, 160, 175-grain bullets. If you have a 1/10" barrel, the rifle generally would not be able to stabilize the longer/heavier bullets as well.

I have seen 1/10" twist 280 rifles that do not stabilize 150-grain bullets well. 140 and lighter bullets work in that case. (The barrel twist is generally relates to bullet length and not weight. You can look up the Greenhill formula if you wish to look into this further.)

BTW: Remington Kore-lokt 150 are shorter than the Remington Kore-lokt 165 grain round nose. That many be a solution for heavier bullets.

If you reload, then you can experiment & develop a load perfect for your rifle.

Here is Remington's website regarding 7600 pumps. I would bet that your gun is a 1/10 twist if the 270s and 30'06s are. I don't see 280s listed, however you can write Remington for detailed information.

http://www.remington.com/products/firearms/centerfire/model-7600/model-7...

Enjoy,

upChuck

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from UpChuck wrote 3 years 24 weeks ago

BTW: Remington Kore-lokt 150 are shorter than the Remington Kore-lokt 165 grain round nose. That many be a solution for heavier bullets.

Correction:
Remington Kore-lokt 165 grain factory round nose cartridges are shorter than the Remington Kore-lokt 150 grain spitzers cartridges.

Also,
Your gun will fire bullets up to five miles. The effect range is about 350 yards. Some hunters site their rifles to 3" high at 100yds so that bullet drop is still within a 6" circle at 300yds or so. Again, experimentation at the range is key to knowing the limitations of your skill/gun combo on the hunt.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

I think you will be pleased with your .280 Rem. A 140 or 150 Core Lokt should kill any deer sized game most efficiently. Yes, you don't want to get too radical with any handloads for that 7600 since the autoloaders and pumps do not have the same leverage to open a sticking bolt or extract a stuck case due to a little overpressure.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ishawooa wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

Don't know who gave a minus to Clay or WAM for offering good advice on reloading for the .280 Rem for a M760 but I plused them to equal things out. I reload for .270 and .280 and consider them ballistic twins but would not shoot my reloads in anything but a bolt action or a strong single shot. I suppose this will rate me a minus also, I don't care.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

whitetailfreek +1 and I'm going to leave it as that. But my question to you and everyone else, why in Gods Green Apples did you buy something yo don't know didly squat about the 280 yet alone the 7600?!?

Before I went to Alaska, I did my very own research on what gun and cartridge to get and fortunately I lucked out with the exception of the scope. The scope had an allergic reaction to the recoil of my 250 Grain Noslers loaded at 2825ish fps! The remedy was a Leupold 3x9x40 VariX-II and still going strong as if it was brand new except for a few scratches!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

By the way

For the 7600 stay with moderate loads as you would in a Semiautomatic.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

Thanks ishawooa Your are a Gentleman & Scholar of Uncommon Sportsmanship quality!

Nothing wrong with the 280 Remington, it's only .5mm larger in caliber than the 6.5-06 and as long as the Shooter keeps the bullet weights at or below 162 grain, they will get phenomenal performance! For deer both Whitetail and Mule Deer, I would use a 120 grain!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from whitetailfreek wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

7600's are great guns and once you find the right load for it, it will probably be a tack driver.

As far as the .280 Remington goes, its a great round as well. Has all the benefits of flat shooting like the .270 Winchester, but still carries more punch like the .30/06 Springfield. Its a great compromise between the two cartridges it came from.

I am a big fan of 7mms.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from whitetailfreek wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

BTW, a 140 grain bullet is a good size overall for the .280 Remington. Just out of basic Remington Core-Lokts, you still have enough kinetic energy to kill a deer out to 500 yards, if you are able to keep it in the vitals. At 200 yards, you have just shy of 2,000 ft. lbs of energy.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from hunterkid94 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

If I bought it, it would be a 270. But it was a gift from my dad. Its light, steady, and I hear its reliable and accurate. Its one of the best gifts Ive ever got.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from LesserSon wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

I don't currently own anything between a .243 and a .30/06, but I'd be tickled to get a .280 as a gift. All I've read on it indicates a subtle performance edge on the .270, though you'll pay extra for the ammo compared to more popular cartidges like .270.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

Clay, 120 in a .28 caliber? Isn't that kind of light? I know you're getting speed and flat trajectory, but what about penetration, excessive expansion, etc? Usually those light for caliber bullets are intended for varmints and the like. I tried 145's or something similar in my 7mm mag once and decided I didn't like wasting meat like that.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from PAShooter wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

My son started out with a 788 Rem .243 at age 12. He 5 deer with that gun, every one he pulled the trigger on. At age 16 I replaced it with a Rem 7600 30-06. He prefers the pump to the bolt with the type of hunting we do. The gun shoots under 1" groups. He has had great success on whitetail with 150 grn. bullets (DRT). He now refuses a gift of a new Sako because of his fondness of the 7600 for the past ten years saying he wouldn't use it. Many people insist that the 7600 kicks hard but my son says not and he weighs about 140#. I guess this "recoil" thing differs with everyone.
120 grn bullets in a 7mm for deer are fine if they have the proper construction. Barnes,Nosler, and others make bullets that will hold together. It certainly would make a nice flat shooting rifle for deer sized game. Fellow reloaders have the advantage in tailor made rounds.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

@ ishawooa

Someone has been sniping at me for several weeks now with the -1's, regardless of posting. I'm rather amused at their infantile behavior.

My brother gifted my son a LNIB 7600 in .35 Whelen last fall and you would think he had just given him an Ed Brown custom! Shoots the 250 grainers as well!

Those 7600's seem to shoot hard with that shotgun stock, but to each his own. My 700 BDL shoots hard enough. The .280 would be on my short list of calibers if I could only have one rifle, although it would be hard to pass a .30-06. The advantage to the .280 is a slightly larger selection of heavier .284" bullets over the beloved .270 Win.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

007

My favorite 30-06 load for Mule deer is a Hornady 130 grain with 54 grains of IMR4064. I've watched several Caribou taken by a Father and Son with 270's with 130's take Caribou all bang flops. The 120 in 7mm/280 is best used in the southwest for it's flat trajectory and knockdown and known a many 7mm Rem Mag shooters use it as well. If I thought for one microsecond that the 280 with a 120 would be a problem, I would have known it. 120 works fantastic on both Whitetail and Mule Deer with plenty of steam to knock there +ick in the dirt!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

PS

This has definitely has been a no "BS" moment!

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

The 76oo is an a highly accurate pump rifle. I have had not had a 7600, but have had several 760's over the years. The 280 is one of my favorite cartridges and for some reason that I can't explain dosen't kick as bad as a .270. You wanted to know the range. You can shoot just about as far as you want to shoot. Seriously if you want it is a 400 yard whitetail rifle. I found the Hornady 139 grain Interlock SST was a fine bullet for whitetails.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Treestand wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

In the World of Jack O'Connor if I hade to chose
between a .270 or a .280 the .280 is his pick.
you have recived good Info, stay with factory ammo
and a good scope you will be just fine.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

My brother-in-law has a 760 in .270. It shoots very well but kicks like the proverbial bay mule. If I didn't already have a 7mm Remington magnum, I'd likely have a .280.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

blackdawgz

What do you think we should do to this punk kid!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

Darn, blackdawgz +1 for'ya!

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from cmikles1 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

You're in luck. This months issue of Rifle magazine has an article about pump rifles. The author spends a lot of time on the 760 and 7600.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

hunterkid,
I have an old 760 rem pump chambered for '06 and as Sarge01 said I can't explain why it is a softer shooter than my Savage '06 other than a proper stock fit.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jim in Mo wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

cmiklel1,
can't wait to get my mag to read it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 3 years 26 weeks ago

Clay, agreed, straightforward info, thanks. I'm starting to drift more and more into the Elmer Keith camp and heavy-for-caliber bullets.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from UpChuck wrote 3 years 24 weeks ago

hunterkid94,

Congratulations on your acquisition. To answer your questions, every gun is different, so this is only a guideline to saving you money in ammo experimentation. If your gun has a 1/9" twist barrel you will generally be able to shoot 140, 150, 160, 175-grain bullets. If you have a 1/10" barrel, the rifle generally would not be able to stabilize the longer/heavier bullets as well.

I have seen 1/10" twist 280 rifles that do not stabilize 150-grain bullets well. 140 and lighter bullets work in that case. (The barrel twist is generally relates to bullet length and not weight. You can look up the Greenhill formula if you wish to look into this further.)

BTW: Remington Kore-lokt 150 are shorter than the Remington Kore-lokt 165 grain round nose. That many be a solution for heavier bullets.

If you reload, then you can experiment & develop a load perfect for your rifle.

Here is Remington's website regarding 7600 pumps. I would bet that your gun is a 1/10 twist if the 270s and 30'06s are. I don't see 280s listed, however you can write Remington for detailed information.

http://www.remington.com/products/firearms/centerfire/model-7600/model-7...

Enjoy,

upChuck

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from UpChuck wrote 3 years 24 weeks ago

BTW: Remington Kore-lokt 150 are shorter than the Remington Kore-lokt 165 grain round nose. That many be a solution for heavier bullets.

Correction:
Remington Kore-lokt 165 grain factory round nose cartridges are shorter than the Remington Kore-lokt 150 grain spitzers cartridges.

Also,
Your gun will fire bullets up to five miles. The effect range is about 350 yards. Some hunters site their rifles to 3" high at 100yds so that bullet drop is still within a 6" circle at 300yds or so. Again, experimentation at the range is key to knowing the limitations of your skill/gun combo on the hunt.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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