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Q:
What is important about 1964, and the Pre-1964 guns, different manufacturing, or what?

Question by Drew McClure. Uploaded on April 10, 2011

Answers (14)

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from PigHunter wrote 3 years 1 week ago

It's a reference to the redesign of the Winchester Model 70 to reduce manufacturing costs because of competition mainly from Remington. The biggest change was going from Controlled Round Feed to Push Feed.

I think it's just a lot about nothing but others don't feel that way and thus the higher prices for pre '64 Winchesters. Given that, years ago I passed up a great deal on a 1969 model 70 in .338 Winchester Magnum believing that 'lower quality' rubbish.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winchester_Model_70

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from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I believe you can sum it with cost of production. Prior to 64 most parts were forged and machined. Screwed rather than pinned. After 64 they were looking to make less important parts out of stamped metal and plastic. Cheaper but not necessarily a bad thing. Today you can buy any out of the box bolt gun that will shoot an inch or less. All thanks to CNC machining. The only difference is the what nostalgia means to us old folks.

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from 99explorer wrote 3 years 1 week ago

1964 was also the last year that our coinage contained 90% silver. After that year, our coins were degraded to "clad," containing only 40% silver.

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from Jere Smith wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Everthing has turned to crap since then too 99.

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from Jere Smith wrote 3 years 1 week ago

even my spelling EVERY thing. :)

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from smallgamehunter25 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I think I read the last year of production of the Rem. Nylon 11 was '64.

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from Keith Costley wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I am glad that you asked this question. I have been curious about the pre 64's as well. My father-in-law owned one and harvested several deer with it until it was stolen a few years ago. Having his rifle stolen broke his heart.

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from steve182 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I thought it was mostly in reference to the Winchester model 70's

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 1 week ago

PigHunter,

I bought a Model 70 ca. 1987 or 1988 push-feed synthetic stocked .338 Win Mag and that was the biggest POS I ever owned. All I did was bruise myself up trying to zero the thing. That was the hardest shooting POS I ever owned ever so briefly. It also shot about 2"-3" groups at 100 yards. Winchester said that was "normal" and good enough and would not be subject to warranty. It wasn't the scope either, since it performed flawlessly on it's successor for many years and still hauls the mail on my son's 7mm Rem Mag.

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from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 1 week ago

It appears that more than the model 70 was impacted by post 64' changes.

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from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Hey 99 How U Doing. Not to be the bearer of bad news. But our quarters are made of nickel clad copper. Being a youngster whose favorite toy was a chemistry set. Well let's just say I like things that go BOOM. To make them go Boom in a particular direction always had an appeal to me. Now to the quarters. It is a method that DuPont developed in the 60's to explosively weld dissimilar metals. Very good with coins, making layered safes, nuclear reactor shields or what ever.

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from PigHunter wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Besides the Model 70, Winchester also modified the Model 94 that same year to reduce costs.

"In mid-1964, the manufacturing of the 94 was changed in order to make the firearm less expensive to produce. Generally referred to as "pre-64" models, these earlier versions command a premium price over post-change rifles. The limited number of early-1964 production models produced prior to the changeover are also considered quite desirable, as they are considered by many to represent the ending of an era."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winchester_Model_1894

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from 99explorer wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Carl,
You are right. The dimes and quarters minted after 1964 contained no silver at all. Only the Kennedy half dollars and Eisenhower dollars minted in San Francisco had 40% silver, and even then, only for a few more years.

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from 358normamag wrote 3 years 1 week ago

The pre-64 Winchesters were machined from a solid block of steel. Today such rifles are made from investment casting. In other words “they don’t make them like that anymore.” And they never will again.

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from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I believe you can sum it with cost of production. Prior to 64 most parts were forged and machined. Screwed rather than pinned. After 64 they were looking to make less important parts out of stamped metal and plastic. Cheaper but not necessarily a bad thing. Today you can buy any out of the box bolt gun that will shoot an inch or less. All thanks to CNC machining. The only difference is the what nostalgia means to us old folks.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 3 years 1 week ago

1964 was also the last year that our coinage contained 90% silver. After that year, our coins were degraded to "clad," containing only 40% silver.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from PigHunter wrote 3 years 1 week ago

It's a reference to the redesign of the Winchester Model 70 to reduce manufacturing costs because of competition mainly from Remington. The biggest change was going from Controlled Round Feed to Push Feed.

I think it's just a lot about nothing but others don't feel that way and thus the higher prices for pre '64 Winchesters. Given that, years ago I passed up a great deal on a 1969 model 70 in .338 Winchester Magnum believing that 'lower quality' rubbish.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winchester_Model_70

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Everthing has turned to crap since then too 99.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 3 years 1 week ago

even my spelling EVERY thing. :)

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 1 week ago

PigHunter,

I bought a Model 70 ca. 1987 or 1988 push-feed synthetic stocked .338 Win Mag and that was the biggest POS I ever owned. All I did was bruise myself up trying to zero the thing. That was the hardest shooting POS I ever owned ever so briefly. It also shot about 2"-3" groups at 100 yards. Winchester said that was "normal" and good enough and would not be subject to warranty. It wasn't the scope either, since it performed flawlessly on it's successor for many years and still hauls the mail on my son's 7mm Rem Mag.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Carl Huber wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Hey 99 How U Doing. Not to be the bearer of bad news. But our quarters are made of nickel clad copper. Being a youngster whose favorite toy was a chemistry set. Well let's just say I like things that go BOOM. To make them go Boom in a particular direction always had an appeal to me. Now to the quarters. It is a method that DuPont developed in the 60's to explosively weld dissimilar metals. Very good with coins, making layered safes, nuclear reactor shields or what ever.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from PigHunter wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Besides the Model 70, Winchester also modified the Model 94 that same year to reduce costs.

"In mid-1964, the manufacturing of the 94 was changed in order to make the firearm less expensive to produce. Generally referred to as "pre-64" models, these earlier versions command a premium price over post-change rifles. The limited number of early-1964 production models produced prior to the changeover are also considered quite desirable, as they are considered by many to represent the ending of an era."
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winchester_Model_1894

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 358normamag wrote 3 years 1 week ago

The pre-64 Winchesters were machined from a solid block of steel. Today such rifles are made from investment casting. In other words “they don’t make them like that anymore.” And they never will again.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from smallgamehunter25 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I think I read the last year of production of the Rem. Nylon 11 was '64.

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from Keith Costley wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I am glad that you asked this question. I have been curious about the pre 64's as well. My father-in-law owned one and harvested several deer with it until it was stolen a few years ago. Having his rifle stolen broke his heart.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 3 years 1 week ago

I thought it was mostly in reference to the Winchester model 70's

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from Drew McClure wrote 3 years 1 week ago

It appears that more than the model 70 was impacted by post 64' changes.

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from 99explorer wrote 3 years 1 week ago

Carl,
You are right. The dimes and quarters minted after 1964 contained no silver at all. Only the Kennedy half dollars and Eisenhower dollars minted in San Francisco had 40% silver, and even then, only for a few more years.

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