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Q:
What is the most accurate rifle brand

Question by 784512. Uploaded on January 03, 2012

Answers (16)

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from 784512 wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

what about savage.

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from Treestand wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

IMHO~ Savage is the most accurate gun out of the box
for its price-tag.
#2 The older Ruger 77MarkII have a larger price-tag
#3 Tikka and Weatherbys

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from fezzant wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Savage has a reputation for extraordinary accuracy out of the box at a relatively low price. That being said, many brands produce rifles with great accuracy, and there have been (and likely will be after your question) numerous debates on which one is the most accurate.

Different models and variations on models and calibers within a given brand will have different accuracies - think of the difference between a Remington 700 in 30-.06 Vs a Remington 700 in .308 with a match grade heavy barrel.

Most quality firearms makers produce weapons that are far more accurate than most shooters. In other words, unless you're an exceptional shot, when you miss, it's not the gun, it's you.

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from JamesD wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

In today's world gun making has taken leaps and bounds from what it was 60 or 70 years ago. With better materials, better ammunition, better optics, and better manufacturing processes the accuracy of today's rifles are what only custom rifles enjoyed back in the day. Any of the popular gun makers of today put out a high quality product and many of them are at a price that the ordinary guy can afford. Back in the late 60's and early 70's Winchester in order to keep the price of some of their popular models affordable tried to cut corners this cost them dearly. Remington on the other hand became the top seller in the U.S. by putting out a high quality product at an affordable price. Gun writers at the time began to use the term "out of the box accuracy" and Remington ran with it. By the late 80's early 90's other gun makers like Savage took the route that Remington did and it paid off as their rifles today are of very high quality and affordable. The Winchester company was sold to the Olin corporation and over time they turned the company around. It's a good example of how the free market has worked to put out the great rifles of high quality that we enjoy today.

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from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

I have had several Savages and they have been shooters, but the Tikka's , Weatherby's and Sako's that I have now I do believe will outshoot the Savages that I had and some of them had accutriggers in them, of course the price is quite different also. Right now almost every reputable manufacture is stepping up to the plate and getting their act together because the shooting public is demanding it.

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from Proverbs wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Sako/Tikka.

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from jay wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Another vote for Sako (and its cousin Tikka).

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from tneal1987 wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Whatever you are most comfortable shooting, I have had great luck with remington, savage, and rugers. But I have found it depends greatly on caliber, optics, balistics, and conditions.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Pretty tough to beat Weatherby's in-writing accuracy guarantee. I have a couple of Remington 700's that will cloverleaf groups with the right loads when I am having a good day. Lots of good rifles out there. Buy, shoot, trade until you get one that really shoots well is what I have done until I started shooting Weatherby Mark V rifles. Accuracy is important, but it is not all there is to a rifle. Safety of design, ease of handling, fit and finish, etc. are to be considered also; at least in my opinion.

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from scratchgolf72 wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

weatherby makes a good shooter, the rem 700 is a shooter, from what ive heard savages are accurate.

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from 30-CAL wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Most rifle makers sell accurate rifles, they have to or they will go under, buy one that fits you well, and you will shoot well.

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from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

It depends on what you consider accuracy to be. 1 MOA is OK for most normal hunting. .5 MOA is better if you are shooting out to 400 yards. Savage, Howa 1500, Tikka, Rem 700 and Weatherby Vanguard should get you in this range. Some rifles with custom loads can reach .25 MOA or better.

Samples from my rifles with tuned loads: Remington 700 Sendero 25-06 w/glass bedding shoots .25, stock Tikka .243 shoots .2, stock Bushmaster Varminter .223 shoots .25, stock Weatherby Mark V Ultralight shoots 1.25-3.0, stock Rem 700 .308 tactical shoots .35, Howa 1500 30-06 with glass bedding shoots .5, stock CZ 550 .375 H&H shoots .75.

If you are varmint hunting or target shooting out to 600 yards, you need .1 or .2 MOA at the worst. If you are shooting 1000 to 2000 yards accurately, you will need .1 MOA. For these, I suggest custom barrels. I like Krieger for .1 MOA out to 200 yards and Lothar Walther for .1 MOA out to 1000 -2000 yards but there are several top makers. I like my Lothar Walther custom .300 Dakota for 1000 yard shooting.

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from BigBboy25 wrote 2 years 14 weeks ago

I'd have to say Remington 700, Winchester Model 70, and the Savage 110 are probably the most accurate rifles out there. Sako's and Tikka's are also good but the thing about the first three rifles I listed is they are used by bench rest, F-class, and long range shooters as the platform for their rifles and all three have been used to win national and international championships. I don't recall seeing tikka or sako in the top ten standings for any major competition. I'm not saying there is anything wrong with the tikka or sako, they make decent rifles and they appeal to lot of hunters (obviously) but I think there are reasons why they haven't been used in competition.

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from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 14 weeks ago

BigBb0y25,
I don't mean to be smart but meet me sometime at the range with your Remington, Winchester and your Savage and I will be there with my Sako and my Weatherby. I classify my Sako and Weatherby as just a bit more than "decent". WAM might be there with his Weatherby too. You will find out that you can talk bad about a guys wife or girlfriend but talking about his rifle is going a little bit too far.

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from BigBboy25 wrote 2 years 14 weeks ago

sarge01

I don't believe I talked bad about Sako, and I didn't even mention Weatherby. Sako does make some high end bolt actions that I've seen used in the military and by SWAT units. I simply stated my opinion, sorry it wasn't what you wanted to hear. But if everybody's opinion was the same the world would be pretty boring. I've gone down to the stores and played with the Tikka T3 because I her so many great reviews on it. It's just not the rifle for me. I have no doubts about their accuracy, I'm sure it is good, and I'm sure Sako's are too. BUT, if you look at the top shooters in the world you'll find that the top choice for a factory action is a Remington 700. There has to be a reason why these shooters choose this action over Sako's, Tikka's, Weatherby's. I'm a fan of Remington. In fact I've got more Remington 700's in my safe than anything else (so I may be a bit biased I admit.) You don't see many custom hunting rifles built on those actions either. But, others (like yourself) may not share my opinion. That is all well. We each have our preferences in rifles and in women (To me they're both not something you want to talk ill about to any self-respecting man).

I will not however ever own a Sako. The reason is the extractor. It weakens the action. I was at the range one day and a guy a ways down shot a round through his sako and got up cussing and throwing his sandbags around. Me and a buddy ran down to see what had happened and if he was okay. He had some small scratches on his face with specks of blood. When we looked at the rifle the extractor had broken and he had speckles on his face from metal 'fragments'. Talked to my gunsmith about it and he said to my surprise that he in fact won't install a sako style extractor on any rifle because of that reason. It surprised me because installing those extractors are the easiest $100 bucks for a gunsmith to make. I don't know if the guy was shooting dangerously hot hand loads or what, but something wasn't sound. I think it's a rare occurrence but that incident really got me watching for pressure signs on my reloads and even more cautious about my reloading procedure. It also put a bad taste in my mouth about the Sako extractor.

Then again you don't hear about any recalls on Sako's for their dangerous extractors but you do on the 700's trigger. . .(that really doesn't help my case now does it) but I've got Jewell triggers in all my 700's.

Sorry of I did offend you however. It was not intentional. I am curious to see/hear how your Sako shoots and what model you have. One thing that can't be argued about is results. If the rifle shoots it shoots. Physics doesn't discriminate on brand, caliber, cartridge, powder, primer etc. Plus, beauty is in the eye of the beholder; so if you are happy with you equipment and success, it doesn't really matter what I or anyone else thinks; and I'm sure you've had great success with it!

Have a good one,

BB25

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from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 14 weeks ago

I have a Sako A7 300WSM and with 165 Nosler Accubonds it will shoot a 1/2 inch group every time to the range if I do my part. I too own a Remington 700 so I'm not anti Remington 700 but I am going to replace the trigger on mine also. My Weatherby .257 shooting Sierra 117 grain ProHunters or Hornady 100 grain interlocks will shoot a 1/2 inch group or better. Not bad for off of the shelf rifles with no trigger work or anything else done to them. Also my barrels look like pencil barrels, my Sako only weighs 6 1/2 pounds.

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from Treestand wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

IMHO~ Savage is the most accurate gun out of the box
for its price-tag.
#2 The older Ruger 77MarkII have a larger price-tag
#3 Tikka and Weatherbys

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from 784512 wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

what about savage.

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from fezzant wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Savage has a reputation for extraordinary accuracy out of the box at a relatively low price. That being said, many brands produce rifles with great accuracy, and there have been (and likely will be after your question) numerous debates on which one is the most accurate.

Different models and variations on models and calibers within a given brand will have different accuracies - think of the difference between a Remington 700 in 30-.06 Vs a Remington 700 in .308 with a match grade heavy barrel.

Most quality firearms makers produce weapons that are far more accurate than most shooters. In other words, unless you're an exceptional shot, when you miss, it's not the gun, it's you.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from JamesD wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

In today's world gun making has taken leaps and bounds from what it was 60 or 70 years ago. With better materials, better ammunition, better optics, and better manufacturing processes the accuracy of today's rifles are what only custom rifles enjoyed back in the day. Any of the popular gun makers of today put out a high quality product and many of them are at a price that the ordinary guy can afford. Back in the late 60's and early 70's Winchester in order to keep the price of some of their popular models affordable tried to cut corners this cost them dearly. Remington on the other hand became the top seller in the U.S. by putting out a high quality product at an affordable price. Gun writers at the time began to use the term "out of the box accuracy" and Remington ran with it. By the late 80's early 90's other gun makers like Savage took the route that Remington did and it paid off as their rifles today are of very high quality and affordable. The Winchester company was sold to the Olin corporation and over time they turned the company around. It's a good example of how the free market has worked to put out the great rifles of high quality that we enjoy today.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

I have had several Savages and they have been shooters, but the Tikka's , Weatherby's and Sako's that I have now I do believe will outshoot the Savages that I had and some of them had accutriggers in them, of course the price is quite different also. Right now almost every reputable manufacture is stepping up to the plate and getting their act together because the shooting public is demanding it.

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from Proverbs wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Sako/Tikka.

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from jay wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Another vote for Sako (and its cousin Tikka).

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from tneal1987 wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Whatever you are most comfortable shooting, I have had great luck with remington, savage, and rugers. But I have found it depends greatly on caliber, optics, balistics, and conditions.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Pretty tough to beat Weatherby's in-writing accuracy guarantee. I have a couple of Remington 700's that will cloverleaf groups with the right loads when I am having a good day. Lots of good rifles out there. Buy, shoot, trade until you get one that really shoots well is what I have done until I started shooting Weatherby Mark V rifles. Accuracy is important, but it is not all there is to a rifle. Safety of design, ease of handling, fit and finish, etc. are to be considered also; at least in my opinion.

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from scratchgolf72 wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

weatherby makes a good shooter, the rem 700 is a shooter, from what ive heard savages are accurate.

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from 30-CAL wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

Most rifle makers sell accurate rifles, they have to or they will go under, buy one that fits you well, and you will shoot well.

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from DakotaMan wrote 2 years 15 weeks ago

It depends on what you consider accuracy to be. 1 MOA is OK for most normal hunting. .5 MOA is better if you are shooting out to 400 yards. Savage, Howa 1500, Tikka, Rem 700 and Weatherby Vanguard should get you in this range. Some rifles with custom loads can reach .25 MOA or better.

Samples from my rifles with tuned loads: Remington 700 Sendero 25-06 w/glass bedding shoots .25, stock Tikka .243 shoots .2, stock Bushmaster Varminter .223 shoots .25, stock Weatherby Mark V Ultralight shoots 1.25-3.0, stock Rem 700 .308 tactical shoots .35, Howa 1500 30-06 with glass bedding shoots .5, stock CZ 550 .375 H&H shoots .75.

If you are varmint hunting or target shooting out to 600 yards, you need .1 or .2 MOA at the worst. If you are shooting 1000 to 2000 yards accurately, you will need .1 MOA. For these, I suggest custom barrels. I like Krieger for .1 MOA out to 200 yards and Lothar Walther for .1 MOA out to 1000 -2000 yards but there are several top makers. I like my Lothar Walther custom .300 Dakota for 1000 yard shooting.

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from BigBboy25 wrote 2 years 14 weeks ago

I'd have to say Remington 700, Winchester Model 70, and the Savage 110 are probably the most accurate rifles out there. Sako's and Tikka's are also good but the thing about the first three rifles I listed is they are used by bench rest, F-class, and long range shooters as the platform for their rifles and all three have been used to win national and international championships. I don't recall seeing tikka or sako in the top ten standings for any major competition. I'm not saying there is anything wrong with the tikka or sako, they make decent rifles and they appeal to lot of hunters (obviously) but I think there are reasons why they haven't been used in competition.

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from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 14 weeks ago

BigBb0y25,
I don't mean to be smart but meet me sometime at the range with your Remington, Winchester and your Savage and I will be there with my Sako and my Weatherby. I classify my Sako and Weatherby as just a bit more than "decent". WAM might be there with his Weatherby too. You will find out that you can talk bad about a guys wife or girlfriend but talking about his rifle is going a little bit too far.

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from BigBboy25 wrote 2 years 14 weeks ago

sarge01

I don't believe I talked bad about Sako, and I didn't even mention Weatherby. Sako does make some high end bolt actions that I've seen used in the military and by SWAT units. I simply stated my opinion, sorry it wasn't what you wanted to hear. But if everybody's opinion was the same the world would be pretty boring. I've gone down to the stores and played with the Tikka T3 because I her so many great reviews on it. It's just not the rifle for me. I have no doubts about their accuracy, I'm sure it is good, and I'm sure Sako's are too. BUT, if you look at the top shooters in the world you'll find that the top choice for a factory action is a Remington 700. There has to be a reason why these shooters choose this action over Sako's, Tikka's, Weatherby's. I'm a fan of Remington. In fact I've got more Remington 700's in my safe than anything else (so I may be a bit biased I admit.) You don't see many custom hunting rifles built on those actions either. But, others (like yourself) may not share my opinion. That is all well. We each have our preferences in rifles and in women (To me they're both not something you want to talk ill about to any self-respecting man).

I will not however ever own a Sako. The reason is the extractor. It weakens the action. I was at the range one day and a guy a ways down shot a round through his sako and got up cussing and throwing his sandbags around. Me and a buddy ran down to see what had happened and if he was okay. He had some small scratches on his face with specks of blood. When we looked at the rifle the extractor had broken and he had speckles on his face from metal 'fragments'. Talked to my gunsmith about it and he said to my surprise that he in fact won't install a sako style extractor on any rifle because of that reason. It surprised me because installing those extractors are the easiest $100 bucks for a gunsmith to make. I don't know if the guy was shooting dangerously hot hand loads or what, but something wasn't sound. I think it's a rare occurrence but that incident really got me watching for pressure signs on my reloads and even more cautious about my reloading procedure. It also put a bad taste in my mouth about the Sako extractor.

Then again you don't hear about any recalls on Sako's for their dangerous extractors but you do on the 700's trigger. . .(that really doesn't help my case now does it) but I've got Jewell triggers in all my 700's.

Sorry of I did offend you however. It was not intentional. I am curious to see/hear how your Sako shoots and what model you have. One thing that can't be argued about is results. If the rifle shoots it shoots. Physics doesn't discriminate on brand, caliber, cartridge, powder, primer etc. Plus, beauty is in the eye of the beholder; so if you are happy with you equipment and success, it doesn't really matter what I or anyone else thinks; and I'm sure you've had great success with it!

Have a good one,

BB25

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from Sarge01 wrote 2 years 14 weeks ago

I have a Sako A7 300WSM and with 165 Nosler Accubonds it will shoot a 1/2 inch group every time to the range if I do my part. I too own a Remington 700 so I'm not anti Remington 700 but I am going to replace the trigger on mine also. My Weatherby .257 shooting Sierra 117 grain ProHunters or Hornady 100 grain interlocks will shoot a 1/2 inch group or better. Not bad for off of the shelf rifles with no trigger work or anything else done to them. Also my barrels look like pencil barrels, my Sako only weighs 6 1/2 pounds.

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