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Q:
What are some good shooting drills to help improve my rifle shooting ability? I shoot a Winchester model 70 if it helps.

Question by NDshooter. Uploaded on January 16, 2011

Answers (10)

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from tduke wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Be consistant: cheekweld, sight picture, contol led breathing, trigger squeeze. Practice !!!!!!!!!!!!

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from PigHunter wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Ditto to Tduke. In my younger days, I learned a lot studying to shoot in competition to gain my DCM rifle. There's a few shooting articles on their site:
http://www.odcmp.com/USAMU/Shooting_Tips.htm

Take a special look at the one titled "Standing and Trigger Control". Many of my shots at game are from standing position since I stalk hunt. Learning to shoot accurately while standing is one of the best things I ever did. My best friend always shoots standing at the range for practice and only uses a bench when sighting in a new firearm. He is very accurate and quick.
http://www.odcmp.org/1007/default.asp?page=USAMU_STANDING

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Cgull wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Practice often, practice shooting offhand with no bench, using three points of contact when shooting ( two hands, elbow on knee. two hands, palm on tree. A shooting stick. I practice with 22's and pellet guns all the time. Shooting year round with the 22's and pellet guns helps keep me on target.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from whitetailfreek wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Dry firing is also a huge benefit to getting used to trigger control. If you want, get some Snap Caps, and load the inert "training" round into the chamber. Go prone, and close your eyes. Obviously the rifle, is not "loaded" and it is a safe firearm. With your eyes closed, and the weapon pointed in a safe direction, pull the trigger until the firing pin releases.

Get used to the feel of the trigger breaking. Its an art and a science rolled into one. The break of a trigger is almost spiritual. (Kind of kidding, but kind of not.)

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from radam wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

I agree with Tduke nothing is going to help as much as burning up some rounds on the range. Unless your problem is flinching from recoil, then you have to go about fixing that first, as for drills there are alot of fun targets you can find online or if you have a friend with you you can play tic tac toe

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BrigMarine wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Thumbscrew, high pocket of shoulder, reach out grab air, high firm pistol grip, stock weld, eye relief, rotate down, adjust. Big factors are sight picture and breath control. Semper Fi

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from smallgamehunter25 wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Offhand shooting for a bit makes everything else seem like nothin... give it a try at 25-100 yds at paper plates

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from cmikles1 wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Jeff Cooper would try to hit all of the o's and 0's during a commercial ad, focusing on trigger pull and bolt cycling. Make sure it is unloaded, and use a snap cap.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

before deer season usually i will practice mounting my rifle, ill stand looking out a window and pick out objects, and practice quick target aquisition (always throw the gun up with both eyes open, you will always be one target that way). also go to the range and put 40-50 rounds every weekend through your model 70 shooting from all different positions before the season opens, start a few months before the season.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

If you want to get good, you will have to shoot a lot. Dry firing is very good to get the feel of the aim and the trigger but actually hitting something builds confidence. If you can reload, you will get less expensive ammo. Shoot targets from a rest, prone, sitting and standing so you get familiar with your capabilities and limitations. Once you can hit a still target, you can have someone pull targest behind their car or truck at the speed of running game. Get used to this out to at least 100 yards. It may take you a couple of years but you will get there if you practice.

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from Cgull wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Practice often, practice shooting offhand with no bench, using three points of contact when shooting ( two hands, elbow on knee. two hands, palm on tree. A shooting stick. I practice with 22's and pellet guns all the time. Shooting year round with the 22's and pellet guns helps keep me on target.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from whitetailfreek wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Dry firing is also a huge benefit to getting used to trigger control. If you want, get some Snap Caps, and load the inert "training" round into the chamber. Go prone, and close your eyes. Obviously the rifle, is not "loaded" and it is a safe firearm. With your eyes closed, and the weapon pointed in a safe direction, pull the trigger until the firing pin releases.

Get used to the feel of the trigger breaking. Its an art and a science rolled into one. The break of a trigger is almost spiritual. (Kind of kidding, but kind of not.)

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from tduke wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Be consistant: cheekweld, sight picture, contol led breathing, trigger squeeze. Practice !!!!!!!!!!!!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from PigHunter wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Ditto to Tduke. In my younger days, I learned a lot studying to shoot in competition to gain my DCM rifle. There's a few shooting articles on their site:
http://www.odcmp.com/USAMU/Shooting_Tips.htm

Take a special look at the one titled "Standing and Trigger Control". Many of my shots at game are from standing position since I stalk hunt. Learning to shoot accurately while standing is one of the best things I ever did. My best friend always shoots standing at the range for practice and only uses a bench when sighting in a new firearm. He is very accurate and quick.
http://www.odcmp.org/1007/default.asp?page=USAMU_STANDING

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from radam wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

I agree with Tduke nothing is going to help as much as burning up some rounds on the range. Unless your problem is flinching from recoil, then you have to go about fixing that first, as for drills there are alot of fun targets you can find online or if you have a friend with you you can play tic tac toe

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from BrigMarine wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Thumbscrew, high pocket of shoulder, reach out grab air, high firm pistol grip, stock weld, eye relief, rotate down, adjust. Big factors are sight picture and breath control. Semper Fi

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from smallgamehunter25 wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Offhand shooting for a bit makes everything else seem like nothin... give it a try at 25-100 yds at paper plates

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from cmikles1 wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

Jeff Cooper would try to hit all of the o's and 0's during a commercial ad, focusing on trigger pull and bolt cycling. Make sure it is unloaded, and use a snap cap.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

before deer season usually i will practice mounting my rifle, ill stand looking out a window and pick out objects, and practice quick target aquisition (always throw the gun up with both eyes open, you will always be one target that way). also go to the range and put 40-50 rounds every weekend through your model 70 shooting from all different positions before the season opens, start a few months before the season.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 13 weeks ago

If you want to get good, you will have to shoot a lot. Dry firing is very good to get the feel of the aim and the trigger but actually hitting something builds confidence. If you can reload, you will get less expensive ammo. Shoot targets from a rest, prone, sitting and standing so you get familiar with your capabilities and limitations. Once you can hit a still target, you can have someone pull targest behind their car or truck at the speed of running game. Get used to this out to at least 100 yards. It may take you a couple of years but you will get there if you practice.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

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