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Q:
if a young buck is a cowhorn(two horns sticking straite up in the air with no alternate points sticking off) does that mean his geans aren't as good as the regular bucks like young 3x3 or 2x2 or does the buck just have that as like his first rack and will be a nicer one next season?

Question by littlekid15. Uploaded on November 01, 2011

Answers (9)

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from 99explorer wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

I don't think that spikes on a yearling buck are an accurate indicator of what his future antlers would look like. I believe that the majority of them start out with spikes the first year.

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from scratchgolf72 wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

it really depends on a a lot of things, with genetics and nutrition being the biggest....in my neck of the woods, a majority of the year and a half old bucks are 4-5 pointers, but occasionally ill see a spike.

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from fliphuntr14 wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

No. First point deer move so much so culling genes is not an accurate practice. Next spikes or young bucks often sport spikes only for one year and the develop a rack with more points the next year. Genetics isn't as simple as tv shows with ranches portay them. There is alot of other factors such as food, age, minerals and competition for those things that determine rack size and shape. Now an old deer by old i mean pushing 8 years can regress to become spikes due to tooth decay and just age in general. hope that answers your question

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from country road wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

It's too early to tell. There have been lots of studies done where spikes developed into magnificent trophies. It will be a couple of years down the road before you can tell---fliphuntr14 has some excellent points.

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from RylieGipson wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

We have a 3 pointer thats 4 years old. fork and a 9 in spike.My friend saw a spike thats 3 years old 9 in spike on both sides. I no around here the rack says nothing about geans or age.

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from RES1956 wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Look at the deer. If it obviously a young deer, let it go. If it is a sway back, pot bellied, mule faced spike, shoot it, because it is likely 3.5-4.5 and it ain't gettin no better. Get good at aging deer on the hoof before you start culling 'inferior' deer.
Sound like Rylie's got a problem, with nutrition and/or overpopulation.

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from RylieGipson wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

How would I take care of that problem?

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from fliphuntr14 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Im assuming your from the South rylie from other posts I've seen , the shape down there in relation to size I think has to do with how hot the summers get and the fact that the deer burn a ton of calories during the summer getting to food and water during primary antler growth. The only other explanation I can think of maybe a low degree of genetic variability (inbreeding) which happens on ranches, thats why they spend big money on genes. I don't think that is the case in the majority because like I said in the previous post deer can move vast distances from where there born to where there core area can be.
My educated guess would be the first one the only way to know would be to plant food plots that are edible in july or june I believe down there also watering holes and minerals closer to suitable bedding area.

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from RylieGipson wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

actually, Im in Ohio But would mineral blocks by water still work? they get plenty to eat beans and corn all summer long, but Ill try minerals.

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from fliphuntr14 wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

No. First point deer move so much so culling genes is not an accurate practice. Next spikes or young bucks often sport spikes only for one year and the develop a rack with more points the next year. Genetics isn't as simple as tv shows with ranches portay them. There is alot of other factors such as food, age, minerals and competition for those things that determine rack size and shape. Now an old deer by old i mean pushing 8 years can regress to become spikes due to tooth decay and just age in general. hope that answers your question

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

I don't think that spikes on a yearling buck are an accurate indicator of what his future antlers would look like. I believe that the majority of them start out with spikes the first year.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

It's too early to tell. There have been lots of studies done where spikes developed into magnificent trophies. It will be a couple of years down the road before you can tell---fliphuntr14 has some excellent points.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from fliphuntr14 wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

Im assuming your from the South rylie from other posts I've seen , the shape down there in relation to size I think has to do with how hot the summers get and the fact that the deer burn a ton of calories during the summer getting to food and water during primary antler growth. The only other explanation I can think of maybe a low degree of genetic variability (inbreeding) which happens on ranches, thats why they spend big money on genes. I don't think that is the case in the majority because like I said in the previous post deer can move vast distances from where there born to where there core area can be.
My educated guess would be the first one the only way to know would be to plant food plots that are edible in july or june I believe down there also watering holes and minerals closer to suitable bedding area.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

it really depends on a a lot of things, with genetics and nutrition being the biggest....in my neck of the woods, a majority of the year and a half old bucks are 4-5 pointers, but occasionally ill see a spike.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RylieGipson wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

We have a 3 pointer thats 4 years old. fork and a 9 in spike.My friend saw a spike thats 3 years old 9 in spike on both sides. I no around here the rack says nothing about geans or age.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RES1956 wrote 2 years 24 weeks ago

Look at the deer. If it obviously a young deer, let it go. If it is a sway back, pot bellied, mule faced spike, shoot it, because it is likely 3.5-4.5 and it ain't gettin no better. Get good at aging deer on the hoof before you start culling 'inferior' deer.
Sound like Rylie's got a problem, with nutrition and/or overpopulation.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RylieGipson wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

How would I take care of that problem?

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from RylieGipson wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

actually, Im in Ohio But would mineral blocks by water still work? they get plenty to eat beans and corn all summer long, but Ill try minerals.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer