Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

AnswersASK YOUR QUESTION

Answers

Q:
Do I need a slug barrel for my shotgun or can I use my regular barrel? Is it really hard on the barrel?

Question by TurkeyMaster55. Uploaded on April 08, 2010

Answers (7)

Top Rated
All Answers
from seadog wrote 4 years 1 week ago

You can use rifled slugs, like Remington Sluggers, if you have the right choke. If you have a screw in choke, just get a cylinder choke. But, a rifled barrel & sabot slugs are better if you can afford it.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ByeByeBambi wrote 4 years 1 week ago

It depends on the barrel, the choke, and if you're a gambling man. First, some barrels say on them 'WARNING, THE USE OF SLUGS IN THIS BARREL COULD RESULT IN SERIOUS PERSONAL INJURY OR DAMAGE TO GUN', or something to that effect. If it doesn't on your gun (or in your manual), then it depends on your choke. If you have a gun with a built-in choke, then DO NOT USE IT. If you have interchangeable screw-on chokes, then put an open cylinder on it. Use a rifled slug, and be cautious. This is where the gambling part comes in, the slugs hopefully won't make your muzzle crack open, but it may damage the inside. So shoot a few slugs, take your gun apart, and check if you have any damage to your barrel. If you take your chance, you may not have to buy any barrels, but if it goes wrong, you may need to buy a regular barrel and a slug barrel, not to mention the slim chance of a hospital visit. If it were me I might just go out and buy a slug barrel, and save a lot of potential hassle. Hope this was helpful!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Treestand wrote 4 years 1 week ago

If your bird barrel is improved cylinder you can use slug,s[oldschool] if not buy a slug barrel.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from 4trx300 wrote 4 years 1 week ago

a buddy of mine had a sweet pattern from a single shot,then he went and shot a slug through it.now he swears up and down that it wont even kill a squirrel.real world experience tells him to go buy a slug barrel next time.full choke + slugs= problems

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ozark Hunter wrote 4 years 1 week ago

This is what I shoot, Model 11-87™ Sportsman® Super Mag Shurshot™ Turkey and with a Improved Cylinder, it piratically drills the same hole at 50 yards with Federal 1oz Slugs!

http://remington.com/products/firearms/shotguns/model-11-87/model-11-87-...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 1 week ago

If you want real accuracy invest in a Cantilevered Rifled Barrel and invest in Sabot Slugs and a Red Dot Sight, dead meat every time.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 1 week ago

Rifled (lead)slugs can be fired through any choke, though improved cylinder works best. I, personally, would avoid shooting slugs though a full or extra full choke tube. A rifled barrel allows you to shoot the more accurate sabot or copper-jacketed slugs.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer

from Treestand wrote 4 years 1 week ago

If your bird barrel is improved cylinder you can use slug,s[oldschool] if not buy a slug barrel.

+4 Good Comment? | | Report
from seadog wrote 4 years 1 week ago

You can use rifled slugs, like Remington Sluggers, if you have the right choke. If you have a screw in choke, just get a cylinder choke. But, a rifled barrel & sabot slugs are better if you can afford it.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 4 years 1 week ago

Rifled (lead)slugs can be fired through any choke, though improved cylinder works best. I, personally, would avoid shooting slugs though a full or extra full choke tube. A rifled barrel allows you to shoot the more accurate sabot or copper-jacketed slugs.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from ByeByeBambi wrote 4 years 1 week ago

It depends on the barrel, the choke, and if you're a gambling man. First, some barrels say on them 'WARNING, THE USE OF SLUGS IN THIS BARREL COULD RESULT IN SERIOUS PERSONAL INJURY OR DAMAGE TO GUN', or something to that effect. If it doesn't on your gun (or in your manual), then it depends on your choke. If you have a gun with a built-in choke, then DO NOT USE IT. If you have interchangeable screw-on chokes, then put an open cylinder on it. Use a rifled slug, and be cautious. This is where the gambling part comes in, the slugs hopefully won't make your muzzle crack open, but it may damage the inside. So shoot a few slugs, take your gun apart, and check if you have any damage to your barrel. If you take your chance, you may not have to buy any barrels, but if it goes wrong, you may need to buy a regular barrel and a slug barrel, not to mention the slim chance of a hospital visit. If it were me I might just go out and buy a slug barrel, and save a lot of potential hassle. Hope this was helpful!

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 4trx300 wrote 4 years 1 week ago

a buddy of mine had a sweet pattern from a single shot,then he went and shot a slug through it.now he swears up and down that it wont even kill a squirrel.real world experience tells him to go buy a slug barrel next time.full choke + slugs= problems

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ozark Hunter wrote 4 years 1 week ago

This is what I shoot, Model 11-87™ Sportsman® Super Mag Shurshot™ Turkey and with a Improved Cylinder, it piratically drills the same hole at 50 yards with Federal 1oz Slugs!

http://remington.com/products/firearms/shotguns/model-11-87/model-11-87-...

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from Jere Smith wrote 4 years 1 week ago

If you want real accuracy invest in a Cantilevered Rifled Barrel and invest in Sabot Slugs and a Red Dot Sight, dead meat every time.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report

Post an Answer