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Q:
How long do you let a freshly killed deer hang when the weather is warm? Archery is coming up and the weather is still hitting 75 here unbelieveably. I don't want the meat to spoil

Question by mountaindew732. Uploaded on September 23, 2010

Answers (12)

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from lefthandedshooter wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

well last sunday i got one and i butchered it the next day . dont let it out long to be safe that day or the next if its warm out . but rifle season you can wait a little bit if its cold

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

If the air temperature is above 35 degrees after the carcass has hung and cooled to ambient temperature, it gets cut up and put into coolers with ice or delivered to the processor's cooler. Nothing like rancid venison to endear you to your family and friends.

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from furbuster wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

Quarter it out & put in in the frig in the garage. I have to move my beer to the kitchen then but what the heck.

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from country road wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

Since the weather is almost always too warm here to let a deer hang, it gets cut up and put into a cooler immediately and does its aging there.

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from Mark J wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

I agree with every one above, get that deer cut up and on ice asap.

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from finnyk wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

75 degrees? I was in my treestand the other day and it was about 85/90 - I was actually wondering the same thing you have asked here, and debating my sanity, because I knew that from where I was - if I were to take a deer, I would have had to call the local meat processor and get him out of bed to get the thing in the freezer for processing. I would have been a long time getting the deer out of the woods. Then I realized it was just too dang hot and I had just picked the wrong day and the wrong place, so I packed it in and went to the house. But - it was opening day for archery, and I had seen 3 decent bucks and a good doe in my scouting out there just days before, so I wasn't going to be denied the chance to get out into the woods.

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from Armchair Mike wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

The cooler method really freaked me out the first time I saw it. In Tennessee where I used to hunt we would hang them overnight. Unless it was the dead of winter, that was the only time the temperature stayed low enough. Here in sunny Lower Alabama, I'm not sure it has ever gotten that cold. Well, maybe once for 15 minutes. Seriously, we have about 6 days a year of what I would call "deer hunting weather" and only three seasons: Pretty Hot, Hotter, and Just Too Dang Hot. I skin the deer right out of the woods, quarter it, and into the cooler it goes. My sweet wife helps me process it over the course of the next week.

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from sgaredneck wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

Armchair,
LOL We have the same weather here just to the East of you. Have a friend that took an old refrigerator, gutted it, put a hook in the top, and set it up to hang his deer in. Have witnessed and partaken of his refrigerator-aged deer and it is good. I keep saying that I am gonna try that but the cooler/ice method has always been the way here.

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from Armchair Mike wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

That is freaking brilliant! But where does all the beer go?

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from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

I'm too old, I don't hang a deer. I roll them into a gutting cradle, skin them, and quarter them into a cooler. Cooler is then dragged to fridge where deer is transfered to fridge. Normally, it takes three days to convert deer to freezer.
THEN, it's time to go hunting again!
I would probably hang a deer outside, but the weather in my area is too inconsistent.
A lady at church takes her son hunting. They quarter their deer up and place it in a cooler with ice. For the next three days, they pour the water off and replace the ice morning and night.
Unless I inadvertently clip an intestine or puncture the bladder, I do NOT want water on my meat!
If you take care in your processing from gutting, skinning and boning, the meat does not need to be washed! Been doing it that way for nigh on to sixty years, ain't had no problems yet!

Bubba

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from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

Don't let is set in 75 degree weather. You need to get it into a cooler as soon as possible. If it is shot in the evening and it will cool to 40 degrees or so at night, it is OK to quarter it and let it cool before you cut it up or put it in a cooler. One of the reasons deer tastes gamey is because it was poorly bled and cooled. If you handled beef that way, it would taste gamey too.

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from Armchair Mike wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

Dcast, this beer tastes gamey. Where did you get it? Still laughing.

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from lefthandedshooter wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

well last sunday i got one and i butchered it the next day . dont let it out long to be safe that day or the next if its warm out . but rifle season you can wait a little bit if its cold

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

If the air temperature is above 35 degrees after the carcass has hung and cooled to ambient temperature, it gets cut up and put into coolers with ice or delivered to the processor's cooler. Nothing like rancid venison to endear you to your family and friends.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from furbuster wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

Quarter it out & put in in the frig in the garage. I have to move my beer to the kitchen then but what the heck.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from country road wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

Since the weather is almost always too warm here to let a deer hang, it gets cut up and put into a cooler immediately and does its aging there.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Mark J wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

I agree with every one above, get that deer cut up and on ice asap.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from finnyk wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

75 degrees? I was in my treestand the other day and it was about 85/90 - I was actually wondering the same thing you have asked here, and debating my sanity, because I knew that from where I was - if I were to take a deer, I would have had to call the local meat processor and get him out of bed to get the thing in the freezer for processing. I would have been a long time getting the deer out of the woods. Then I realized it was just too dang hot and I had just picked the wrong day and the wrong place, so I packed it in and went to the house. But - it was opening day for archery, and I had seen 3 decent bucks and a good doe in my scouting out there just days before, so I wasn't going to be denied the chance to get out into the woods.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Armchair Mike wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

The cooler method really freaked me out the first time I saw it. In Tennessee where I used to hunt we would hang them overnight. Unless it was the dead of winter, that was the only time the temperature stayed low enough. Here in sunny Lower Alabama, I'm not sure it has ever gotten that cold. Well, maybe once for 15 minutes. Seriously, we have about 6 days a year of what I would call "deer hunting weather" and only three seasons: Pretty Hot, Hotter, and Just Too Dang Hot. I skin the deer right out of the woods, quarter it, and into the cooler it goes. My sweet wife helps me process it over the course of the next week.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Armchair Mike wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

That is freaking brilliant! But where does all the beer go?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

I'm too old, I don't hang a deer. I roll them into a gutting cradle, skin them, and quarter them into a cooler. Cooler is then dragged to fridge where deer is transfered to fridge. Normally, it takes three days to convert deer to freezer.
THEN, it's time to go hunting again!
I would probably hang a deer outside, but the weather in my area is too inconsistent.
A lady at church takes her son hunting. They quarter their deer up and place it in a cooler with ice. For the next three days, they pour the water off and replace the ice morning and night.
Unless I inadvertently clip an intestine or puncture the bladder, I do NOT want water on my meat!
If you take care in your processing from gutting, skinning and boning, the meat does not need to be washed! Been doing it that way for nigh on to sixty years, ain't had no problems yet!

Bubba

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from DakotaMan wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

Don't let is set in 75 degree weather. You need to get it into a cooler as soon as possible. If it is shot in the evening and it will cool to 40 degrees or so at night, it is OK to quarter it and let it cool before you cut it up or put it in a cooler. One of the reasons deer tastes gamey is because it was poorly bled and cooled. If you handled beef that way, it would taste gamey too.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Armchair Mike wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

Dcast, this beer tastes gamey. Where did you get it? Still laughing.

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from sgaredneck wrote 3 years 29 weeks ago

Armchair,
LOL We have the same weather here just to the East of you. Have a friend that took an old refrigerator, gutted it, put a hook in the top, and set it up to hang his deer in. Have witnessed and partaken of his refrigerator-aged deer and it is good. I keep saying that I am gonna try that but the cooler/ice method has always been the way here.

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