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Q:
I just finished watching a program called Hunter's Life with Larry Weishuhn and he was hunting with an outfitter and the hunt was a high fenced one. I am not going to pigeon hole anyone but I couldn't see myself participating in a high fenced hunt...no matter how many acres they had to roam. There are no such places in my neck of the woods and even if there were, I couldn't see me doing it..what are your thoughts on high fenced hunting?

Question by tootall75. Uploaded on December 02, 2012

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I think there is a misconception that game animals living within high-fenced ranches are more tame than the animals on the other side of the fence. Or that the terrain is different, or other factors working to the hunter's advantage.
If you want to hunt axis deer or blackbuck antelope in the U.S., rather than in India, you may have no other choice but to hunt on an exotic game ranch. Some of the ranches in Texas are larger than the state of Rhode Island.

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from Bioguy01 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

It's not for me, though I do believe that there is a difference between a high-fenced hunt and a canned hunt.

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from mselseth wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

It's like going to a farm and shooting a fenced in cow. There's no sense in it.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Talk about a waste of film footage! Takes some brass onions to put something like that over the air. Some guys have no self-respect.

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

When a hunter shoots a black bear from a tree stand while the bear is feeding at a bait bucket, that is considered fair chase. To my way of thinking, it is more like shooting a dog at his dish.
There are places in this country where deer are confined by natural boundaries like rivers and cliffs, but no high fences. They are considered free-roaming.
I had a neighbor back in Texas who once shot an aoudad (Barbary Sheep) on his place while it was grazing with his angora goats. It had escaped from an exotic game ranch.
He has the head mounted over his fireplace. I wouldn't know how to classify that.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Shooting black bear over bait is about the only effective way to keep the population under control in areas where that is an issue. I don't hunt bears here that way but I'm glad some folks do. We are crawling with the things.

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from crm3006 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

99explorer is the only person on this page who has any conception of what he is posting about.

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I have to agree with crm3006.
And thank you for the compliment, sir.

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from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

There are deer "ranches" (hi-fence!) that cover "sections"! Free ranging deer "never" see a fence! EVER! Still, it's hi fence hunting!
99
Blackbuck, nilgai, aoudad and several different species have escaped captivity and now run free. (feral?) Alas, they don't have "seasons" for them. Most of it started around the YO Ranch, Texas first true "exotic" ranch.

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

The YO ranch at one time was over half a million acres in size, but today it's only about 40,000 acres. I think there are about 50 species of exotics on it.

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from steve182 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Piss poor. High fenced "hunting" isn't hunting. Mr Whitetail is a fraud. I won't buy products he endorses.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

That is "Mr Whitetail" for you. Right down to the ridiculous green gloves! LOL

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from tootall75 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

crm3006,

I take exception to your comments about 99explorer being the only person who has any "conception" of what he is talking about. I have only been on this blog for around a year and although you see the odd comment that is off color, I find the posters here to be knowledgeable and cordial. We all share the same passion for hunting, guns,fishing, the outdoors etc...and I like reading peoples opinions...which is why I posted the question, to state my opinion and get the opinion of others...that is what this blog is for is it not?

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from chuckles wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

99explorer, have you ever tried DIY bear baiting or talked with anyone who has tried it? I respect your right to have that opinion but I am curious as to how informed it is.

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from scratchgolf72 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

larry is always good for a few high fence hunts. i was watching him on TV awhile ago and he was on a rifle hunt in PA in OCTOBER!!! rifle season in PA is always first monday after thanksgiving, so clearly he was high fence. he killed an absolutely massive deer, i think the biggest one he ever killed. but how can you count that? Mr. Whitetail is pretty knowledgable on killing bucks inside a fence, but im not so sure he can kill to many outside the fence.

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from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I don't hunt most of those situations, however I wish I could afford to try that nice big area in Texas with exotics. I certainly don't chastise other hunters for chosing something different than I would though. Many of them may only have hours to hunt and they live hours of flying time away.

More power to them if they can afford it and if they enjoy it. I like hunting natural wild animals in most cases because they seem to be smarter and more of a challenge. That being said, I have seen people who have never hunted much have the time of their lives shooting pen raised pheasants that could hardly fly. It got them as excited as I was when I first hunted. It also gave them the urge to learn more about hunting and take a trip to the heart of wild pheasant land.

There is more than one way to enjoy yourself and I don't expect everyone in the world to enjoy what I enjoy. Diversity makes life interesting.

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I have a friend who recently hunted black bear in Canada. It was a guided hunt, and the guide placed him at a permanent tree stand overlooking a bait barrel, saying he would return for him later in the day.
My friend soon shot and wounded a black bear, which trotted off in the direction it had come. My friend didn't dare to follow it, as he was alone.
Shortly thereafter, another black bear appeared at the feeder, and my friend was not sure whether it was the first bear or a new one.
He shot anyway, and the bear took off in the same direction it had come. My friend didn't dare to climb down from the tree until his guide returned.
Then, together they followed the trail until they found a dead bear. As my friend circled the bear, he nearly stepped on another bear that growled at him.
The bear was wounded, but still full of fight.
My friend and the guide dispatched it.
It was an exciting adventure, but of questionable sportsmanship.

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from mselseth wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

High fence whitetail hunt... Not my deal. On the other hand I probably will never get to say I shot a 250 class B&C buck. That's something I can live with. Here's something to think about, if you grew a monster bass in a pond in your backyard and caught it would you mount it on your wall? Personally, I wouldn't but if that's what you're into I guess it's legal to do it with deer so go right ahead.

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from crm3006 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

tootall75-
". There are no such places in my neck of the woods and even if there were, I couldn't see me doing it..."
QED-You don't know what you are posting about. 99explorer does. I do. You sound like the not yet departed but unlamented snafu, posting on subjects you know nothing about except by vicarious experience, ie, videos, TV, whatever. Until you have been there, done that, hold your opinions sir, and do not take exception when the informed among us disagree with your half baked preconceived notions.

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from tootall75 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Wow... did you read my original post? I stated I am not going to pigeon hole anyone...meaning to each their own. I also didn't chastise you for disagreeing with me, I welcome disagreements, if we all thought the same it would be a boring world.

So I ask you this, the next time someone posts an experience you have never had, are you going to comment about it...I reckon you will...see, opinions are like belly buttons, we all have ones and are free to let them be heard. I am not going to get in to an argument in a forum like this but I am disappointed at your lack of tact and will not address any more comments from you.

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from chuckles wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

99explorer, thanks for the reply. I would agree that your friends experience and decision making were questionable.
Even though I helped my friend bait for many years I never had much interest in bear hunting. The baiting was one issue and I had never eaten bear but heard that it was unpalatable.
I finally decided to try it after eating some bear from one of his kills. It was fantastic. I also wanted to see if my distaste for hunting over bait was justified.
What I found was that DIY bear hunting over bait requires a tremendous dedication of time and the hunt itself is very challenging. The first year we baited for two weeks which required a 240mi round trip every three days. I hunted the bait for 4 days in one of the worst mosquito seasons in years. Each sit was 4-5 hours of mental torture as thousands of mosquitos searched out every crevice or bit through multiple layers of clothing. You have to sit motionless while the sweat rains down and the bugs feast. Never saw a bear.
This year we did the same routine but fortunately the bugs were minimal and the temps cooler. On the second night a big bear came in minutes before the end of shooting light. After the shot the bear ran into a big swamp right next to the bait. After tracking him for 75 yards in the dark through brush and grass which restricted vision to 3 feet or less we heard him breathing. I had to get within 3 feet and move the grass out of the way to see the bear and put a finishing shot in him from handshaking distance. My first shot missed the heart by inches and took out the lungs. The bear would not have lived much longer but still managed to make it 100yds and live for 45 minutes. They are amazingly tough. It took us another two hours to get him out of the swamp and back to the cabin. Then we skinned and quartered till 2am. I have rarely been that tired.
To get into the bait you have to walk a half mile in dead silence as the bears often bed close to the bait. Leaving you have to do the same through thick brush with no light. During the hunt you have to be absolutely motionless in the stand. Far more so than deer hunting.
Anyway I only posted this because I have seen you post the "dog at his dish" comment a couple of times and just wanted to let you know that like with most hunting styles generalization are tough to make. Not sure if the story changes your mind, it is not intended to and you have every right to your opinions. I did, however, want to share an experience that was anything but like shooting a dog at his dish at least for me.
Have a Merry Christmas and I hope the woods and water are good to you!

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from crm3006 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

tootall75-
Yes, I read your original post, with your faintly sneering undertone of "I am better than high fence hunters." I even quoted you directly. I reiterate that you know not of what you post.
No, I don't comment on the things I have no knowledge of, but when I do comment, my knowledge is first hand experience, and does not come from a TV show designed to sell products.
Third, and maybe least important, tact ain't in my repertoire. I have little patience for those who display intolerance from a position of ignorance.

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

chuckles- Thank you for you lengthy and courteous reply.
I can see where a DIY bear hunt with bait would be different from my friend's guided hunt with permanent stands and permanent feeders.
In that respect, it would be very much like putting out bait for coyotes or other varmints, which I suppose black bears might be considered in some places.
Merry Christmas to you and yours.

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from chuckles wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

99explorer, You're welcome and thank you. Your contributions to this site are of great value and I always enjoy reading them.
Best
chuckles

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

chuckles - Thanks. Likewise.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

99, up here the dairy farmers who allow me (and anyone else) to goose hunt their fields are pretty much insistent that I shoot bears if I see them. Of course, I don't dare do that with my dogs at hand. Besides, even at very close range goose loads would be hard pressed to dispatch a big black bear. But the poor farmers here are besot with the damn things. You should see the damage they do to their corn fields. A friend of mine who lives out there put up bait barrels in several locations and helped seven people fill their tags this fall. Good for them! Like I said, I'm not interested in it at all but how else are they supposed to hunt them? Bears are down in the dens by the time the snow flies so tracking is really out of the question. Calling and decoys won't work. Drives? Hmmm. Don't expect many volunteer pushers to step forward! So what's left? Nothing that really works ... except baiting and hunting with dogs. I find baiting much more palatable than terrorizing them with dogs!

Again, I don't do bear baiting but someone needs to. I just couldn't sit still in the same place that long. Not for a bear or a deer or an African elephant. It'd drive me nuts (yeah, I know ... it's a short trip). I get bored easily and that kind of "hunting" is a lot more than "easily." It's one reason I quit hunting waterfowl out of a duck blind. In the fields I can get up and take the dogs for a walk when things get slow. But I haven't mastered walking on water yet (I'm working on it though). I pity folks that only know how to hunt out of tree stands or a duck blind or over bear bait. But if that's all they know and it works for them, then all is well. However, if they ever followed me for a season ... their tree stand would likely become a feature item at the Salvation Army Thrift Store. Would be no going back to ambushing once they've been on the track.

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from Safado wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I would consider it to shoot an exotic...high fence not canned. I wouldn't hunt deer or elk that way but have no opinion of those that will. To each his own!

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from crm3006 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

99explorer is the only person on this page who has any conception of what he is posting about.

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from DakotaMan wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I don't hunt most of those situations, however I wish I could afford to try that nice big area in Texas with exotics. I certainly don't chastise other hunters for chosing something different than I would though. Many of them may only have hours to hunt and they live hours of flying time away.

More power to them if they can afford it and if they enjoy it. I like hunting natural wild animals in most cases because they seem to be smarter and more of a challenge. That being said, I have seen people who have never hunted much have the time of their lives shooting pen raised pheasants that could hardly fly. It got them as excited as I was when I first hunted. It also gave them the urge to learn more about hunting and take a trip to the heart of wild pheasant land.

There is more than one way to enjoy yourself and I don't expect everyone in the world to enjoy what I enjoy. Diversity makes life interesting.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I think there is a misconception that game animals living within high-fenced ranches are more tame than the animals on the other side of the fence. Or that the terrain is different, or other factors working to the hunter's advantage.
If you want to hunt axis deer or blackbuck antelope in the U.S., rather than in India, you may have no other choice but to hunt on an exotic game ranch. Some of the ranches in Texas are larger than the state of Rhode Island.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

When a hunter shoots a black bear from a tree stand while the bear is feeding at a bait bucket, that is considered fair chase. To my way of thinking, it is more like shooting a dog at his dish.
There are places in this country where deer are confined by natural boundaries like rivers and cliffs, but no high fences. They are considered free-roaming.
I had a neighbor back in Texas who once shot an aoudad (Barbary Sheep) on his place while it was grazing with his angora goats. It had escaped from an exotic game ranch.
He has the head mounted over his fireplace. I wouldn't know how to classify that.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Piss poor. High fenced "hunting" isn't hunting. Mr Whitetail is a fraud. I won't buy products he endorses.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from mselseth wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

High fence whitetail hunt... Not my deal. On the other hand I probably will never get to say I shot a 250 class B&C buck. That's something I can live with. Here's something to think about, if you grew a monster bass in a pond in your backyard and caught it would you mount it on your wall? Personally, I wouldn't but if that's what you're into I guess it's legal to do it with deer so go right ahead.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from chuckles wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

99explorer, thanks for the reply. I would agree that your friends experience and decision making were questionable.
Even though I helped my friend bait for many years I never had much interest in bear hunting. The baiting was one issue and I had never eaten bear but heard that it was unpalatable.
I finally decided to try it after eating some bear from one of his kills. It was fantastic. I also wanted to see if my distaste for hunting over bait was justified.
What I found was that DIY bear hunting over bait requires a tremendous dedication of time and the hunt itself is very challenging. The first year we baited for two weeks which required a 240mi round trip every three days. I hunted the bait for 4 days in one of the worst mosquito seasons in years. Each sit was 4-5 hours of mental torture as thousands of mosquitos searched out every crevice or bit through multiple layers of clothing. You have to sit motionless while the sweat rains down and the bugs feast. Never saw a bear.
This year we did the same routine but fortunately the bugs were minimal and the temps cooler. On the second night a big bear came in minutes before the end of shooting light. After the shot the bear ran into a big swamp right next to the bait. After tracking him for 75 yards in the dark through brush and grass which restricted vision to 3 feet or less we heard him breathing. I had to get within 3 feet and move the grass out of the way to see the bear and put a finishing shot in him from handshaking distance. My first shot missed the heart by inches and took out the lungs. The bear would not have lived much longer but still managed to make it 100yds and live for 45 minutes. They are amazingly tough. It took us another two hours to get him out of the swamp and back to the cabin. Then we skinned and quartered till 2am. I have rarely been that tired.
To get into the bait you have to walk a half mile in dead silence as the bears often bed close to the bait. Leaving you have to do the same through thick brush with no light. During the hunt you have to be absolutely motionless in the stand. Far more so than deer hunting.
Anyway I only posted this because I have seen you post the "dog at his dish" comment a couple of times and just wanted to let you know that like with most hunting styles generalization are tough to make. Not sure if the story changes your mind, it is not intended to and you have every right to your opinions. I did, however, want to share an experience that was anything but like shooting a dog at his dish at least for me.
Have a Merry Christmas and I hope the woods and water are good to you!

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from chuckles wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

99explorer, You're welcome and thank you. Your contributions to this site are of great value and I always enjoy reading them.
Best
chuckles

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

chuckles - Thanks. Likewise.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

99, up here the dairy farmers who allow me (and anyone else) to goose hunt their fields are pretty much insistent that I shoot bears if I see them. Of course, I don't dare do that with my dogs at hand. Besides, even at very close range goose loads would be hard pressed to dispatch a big black bear. But the poor farmers here are besot with the damn things. You should see the damage they do to their corn fields. A friend of mine who lives out there put up bait barrels in several locations and helped seven people fill their tags this fall. Good for them! Like I said, I'm not interested in it at all but how else are they supposed to hunt them? Bears are down in the dens by the time the snow flies so tracking is really out of the question. Calling and decoys won't work. Drives? Hmmm. Don't expect many volunteer pushers to step forward! So what's left? Nothing that really works ... except baiting and hunting with dogs. I find baiting much more palatable than terrorizing them with dogs!

Again, I don't do bear baiting but someone needs to. I just couldn't sit still in the same place that long. Not for a bear or a deer or an African elephant. It'd drive me nuts (yeah, I know ... it's a short trip). I get bored easily and that kind of "hunting" is a lot more than "easily." It's one reason I quit hunting waterfowl out of a duck blind. In the fields I can get up and take the dogs for a walk when things get slow. But I haven't mastered walking on water yet (I'm working on it though). I pity folks that only know how to hunt out of tree stands or a duck blind or over bear bait. But if that's all they know and it works for them, then all is well. However, if they ever followed me for a season ... their tree stand would likely become a feature item at the Salvation Army Thrift Store. Would be no going back to ambushing once they've been on the track.

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from Bioguy01 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

It's not for me, though I do believe that there is a difference between a high-fenced hunt and a canned hunt.

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from mselseth wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

It's like going to a farm and shooting a fenced in cow. There's no sense in it.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Talk about a waste of film footage! Takes some brass onions to put something like that over the air. Some guys have no self-respect.

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from Ontario Honker ... wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Shooting black bear over bait is about the only effective way to keep the population under control in areas where that is an issue. I don't hunt bears here that way but I'm glad some folks do. We are crawling with the things.

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I have to agree with crm3006.
And thank you for the compliment, sir.

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from FirstBubba wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

There are deer "ranches" (hi-fence!) that cover "sections"! Free ranging deer "never" see a fence! EVER! Still, it's hi fence hunting!
99
Blackbuck, nilgai, aoudad and several different species have escaped captivity and now run free. (feral?) Alas, they don't have "seasons" for them. Most of it started around the YO Ranch, Texas first true "exotic" ranch.

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

The YO ranch at one time was over half a million acres in size, but today it's only about 40,000 acres. I think there are about 50 species of exotics on it.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

That is "Mr Whitetail" for you. Right down to the ridiculous green gloves! LOL

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from tootall75 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

crm3006,

I take exception to your comments about 99explorer being the only person who has any "conception" of what he is talking about. I have only been on this blog for around a year and although you see the odd comment that is off color, I find the posters here to be knowledgeable and cordial. We all share the same passion for hunting, guns,fishing, the outdoors etc...and I like reading peoples opinions...which is why I posted the question, to state my opinion and get the opinion of others...that is what this blog is for is it not?

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from chuckles wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

99explorer, have you ever tried DIY bear baiting or talked with anyone who has tried it? I respect your right to have that opinion but I am curious as to how informed it is.

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from scratchgolf72 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

larry is always good for a few high fence hunts. i was watching him on TV awhile ago and he was on a rifle hunt in PA in OCTOBER!!! rifle season in PA is always first monday after thanksgiving, so clearly he was high fence. he killed an absolutely massive deer, i think the biggest one he ever killed. but how can you count that? Mr. Whitetail is pretty knowledgable on killing bucks inside a fence, but im not so sure he can kill to many outside the fence.

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

I have a friend who recently hunted black bear in Canada. It was a guided hunt, and the guide placed him at a permanent tree stand overlooking a bait barrel, saying he would return for him later in the day.
My friend soon shot and wounded a black bear, which trotted off in the direction it had come. My friend didn't dare to follow it, as he was alone.
Shortly thereafter, another black bear appeared at the feeder, and my friend was not sure whether it was the first bear or a new one.
He shot anyway, and the bear took off in the same direction it had come. My friend didn't dare to climb down from the tree until his guide returned.
Then, together they followed the trail until they found a dead bear. As my friend circled the bear, he nearly stepped on another bear that growled at him.
The bear was wounded, but still full of fight.
My friend and the guide dispatched it.
It was an exciting adventure, but of questionable sportsmanship.

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from crm3006 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

tootall75-
". There are no such places in my neck of the woods and even if there were, I couldn't see me doing it..."
QED-You don't know what you are posting about. 99explorer does. I do. You sound like the not yet departed but unlamented snafu, posting on subjects you know nothing about except by vicarious experience, ie, videos, TV, whatever. Until you have been there, done that, hold your opinions sir, and do not take exception when the informed among us disagree with your half baked preconceived notions.

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from tootall75 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

Wow... did you read my original post? I stated I am not going to pigeon hole anyone...meaning to each their own. I also didn't chastise you for disagreeing with me, I welcome disagreements, if we all thought the same it would be a boring world.

So I ask you this, the next time someone posts an experience you have never had, are you going to comment about it...I reckon you will...see, opinions are like belly buttons, we all have ones and are free to let them be heard. I am not going to get in to an argument in a forum like this but I am disappointed at your lack of tact and will not address any more comments from you.

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from crm3006 wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

tootall75-
Yes, I read your original post, with your faintly sneering undertone of "I am better than high fence hunters." I even quoted you directly. I reiterate that you know not of what you post.
No, I don't comment on the things I have no knowledge of, but when I do comment, my knowledge is first hand experience, and does not come from a TV show designed to sell products.
Third, and maybe least important, tact ain't in my repertoire. I have little patience for those who display intolerance from a position of ignorance.

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from 99explorer wrote 1 year 19 weeks ago

chuckles- Thank you for you lengthy and courteous reply.
I can see where a DIY bear hunt with bait would be different from my friend's guided hunt with permanent stands and permanent feeders.
In that respect, it would be very much like putting out bait for coyotes or other varmints, which I suppose black bears might be considered in some places.
Merry Christmas to you and yours.

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from Safado wrote 1 year 18 weeks ago

I would consider it to shoot an exotic...high fence not canned. I wouldn't hunt deer or elk that way but have no opinion of those that will. To each his own!

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