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Big Game Hunting

Best state(s) for non resident elk hunting

Uploaded on November 21, 2012

A few guys in my family want to try and get tags for 2013 fall hunt.Is this too late to apply and where would I find my best odds ? Bull or cow , either way. And are some required to get a guide or not. Any pro's and cons on the subject are appreciated. Thanks

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from chuckles wrote 1 year 21 weeks ago

Unless things have changed dramatically since I lived there Colorado has the largest elk population in the country. There are millions of acres of public land to hunt and you are not required to get a guide.
Non-resident tags are spendy (500+ for a bull) but you can buy bull tags over the counter. The draw is in the spring and the deadline is sometime in April but definitely do not take my word for that. The Colorado DOW website has lots of info for prospective hunters.
The area around Craig and Meeker has a big herd but I don't know what the public land situation is like in that part of the state.
Good luck, I am planning a 2013 elk hunt myself.

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from steve182 wrote 1 year 21 weeks ago

Eagle County was considered good hunting with some good public land when i passed through the area in the '90s.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Colorado without a doubt.

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from jay wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Well, with zero points anywhere your best bet would be an OTC in Colorado if your hell bent on a 2013. Limited entry units in my experience are much better and worth the wait. Many guys use Colorado as their last resort if they don't pull a limited entry tag in another state. That doesn't mean you can't find a good bull. One of my coworkers killed a nice 320 inch bull in the Routt and a women in their group scored on an awesome 370 inch bull.

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from rock rat wrote 50 weeks 18 hours ago

There are usually tons of leftover draw tags, they become available in July or something
www.wildlife.state.co.us/Pages/Home.aspx Look at the web site and read the harvest statistics which give the percentage of successful hunts by season and sex of animal harvested and Game Management Unit. Also look at the new hunting atlas www.ndis.nrel.colostate.edu/huntingatlas/ which has overlays of winter and summer ranges.

Take the success rate statistics with some salt. One area I know of is all locals and they filled half the tags drawn, but they also have permission for every little piece of private land and they keep each other updated on where the animals are. A normal person might find no animals on the big pieces of public land.

The flip side is some Units with very low success rates have whole herds that aren't even hunted. But you have to hike to them, a long way, like backpack.

The Over The Counter seasons are called second and third. It can snow and it can snow heavy. Be ready to walk a whole bunch. They aren't like deer.

Oh, and feel free to call the CO Wildlife folks, they have a help line where they'll connect you with some one in their department who is very experienced and will help you choose an area.

Plenty of elk out here, come get one.

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from WA Mtnhunter wrote 47 weeks 2 days ago

I must say that Rock Rat gave some excellent advice on choosing an area to hunt in Colorado. In most places on the West Slope, it is doubtful that you can get on private land without paying a fee, so check for public access unless you know someone or arrange to pay a trespass fee in advance. Knocking on doors the day before a hunt is not likely to get you very far in prime elk country.

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from Gary Devine wrote 39 weeks 6 days ago

The best state for a non resident to get an elk license would be Colorado. Years ago, when I bow hunted elk in Colorado you could buy a tag over the counter. Other elk states have a lottery system to hunt elk. It makes it harder for non residents to get a permit.

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from CoBowHunter wrote 32 weeks 2 days ago

There are plenty of good public areas in Colorado where you can get an over-the-counter tag every year.

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from chuckles wrote 1 year 21 weeks ago

Unless things have changed dramatically since I lived there Colorado has the largest elk population in the country. There are millions of acres of public land to hunt and you are not required to get a guide.
Non-resident tags are spendy (500+ for a bull) but you can buy bull tags over the counter. The draw is in the spring and the deadline is sometime in April but definitely do not take my word for that. The Colorado DOW website has lots of info for prospective hunters.
The area around Craig and Meeker has a big herd but I don't know what the public land situation is like in that part of the state.
Good luck, I am planning a 2013 elk hunt myself.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from steve182 wrote 1 year 21 weeks ago

Eagle County was considered good hunting with some good public land when i passed through the area in the '90s.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Colorado without a doubt.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from jay wrote 1 year 20 weeks ago

Well, with zero points anywhere your best bet would be an OTC in Colorado if your hell bent on a 2013. Limited entry units in my experience are much better and worth the wait. Many guys use Colorado as their last resort if they don't pull a limited entry tag in another state. That doesn't mean you can't find a good bull. One of my coworkers killed a nice 320 inch bull in the Routt and a women in their group scored on an awesome 370 inch bull.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rock rat wrote 50 weeks 18 hours ago

There are usually tons of leftover draw tags, they become available in July or something
www.wildlife.state.co.us/Pages/Home.aspx Look at the web site and read the harvest statistics which give the percentage of successful hunts by season and sex of animal harvested and Game Management Unit. Also look at the new hunting atlas www.ndis.nrel.colostate.edu/huntingatlas/ which has overlays of winter and summer ranges.

Take the success rate statistics with some salt. One area I know of is all locals and they filled half the tags drawn, but they also have permission for every little piece of private land and they keep each other updated on where the animals are. A normal person might find no animals on the big pieces of public land.

The flip side is some Units with very low success rates have whole herds that aren't even hunted. But you have to hike to them, a long way, like backpack.

The Over The Counter seasons are called second and third. It can snow and it can snow heavy. Be ready to walk a whole bunch. They aren't like deer.

Oh, and feel free to call the CO Wildlife folks, they have a help line where they'll connect you with some one in their department who is very experienced and will help you choose an area.

Plenty of elk out here, come get one.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 47 weeks 2 days ago

I must say that Rock Rat gave some excellent advice on choosing an area to hunt in Colorado. In most places on the West Slope, it is doubtful that you can get on private land without paying a fee, so check for public access unless you know someone or arrange to pay a trespass fee in advance. Knocking on doors the day before a hunt is not likely to get you very far in prime elk country.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Gary Devine wrote 39 weeks 6 days ago

The best state for a non resident to get an elk license would be Colorado. Years ago, when I bow hunted elk in Colorado you could buy a tag over the counter. Other elk states have a lottery system to hunt elk. It makes it harder for non residents to get a permit.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from CoBowHunter wrote 32 weeks 2 days ago

There are plenty of good public areas in Colorado where you can get an over-the-counter tag every year.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

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