Please Sign In

Please enter a valid username and password
  • Log in with Facebook
» Not a member? Take a moment to register
» Forgot Username or Password

Why Register?
Signing up could earn you gear (click here to learn how)! It also keeps offensive content off our site.

Deer Hunting

8mm Rem Mag

Uploaded on February 16, 2011

Back in the mid 70's, Remington came out with the 8mm Rem Mag, touted as the perfect medicine for everything including halitosis and hangnails.
What happened? Does anybody still shoot an 8 Mag?
Was the recoil that awful.

Top Rated
All Replies
from 007 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

In my little circle of gun nuts, I only know of one in posession, and he hunts white tails with it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from casey11 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

never even heard of an 8mm

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

It was billed as the perfect elk cartridge by many hunting and shooting writers. I would say that it is close if one wants to handle the recoil and blast.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

My friend that owns one is a BIG boy so he can probably stand up behind it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Best I remember, the cartridge itself dwarfed even the .300 Win Mag. Can't remember that the store I worked in ever sold but one. It was in a Rem 700 BDL. It was bought by a little skinny guy that probably didn't weigh 160 lbs. He said recoil wasn't that bad, but he couldn't shoot his "triple deuce" for accuracy same day he shot the 8 mag. LOL!!!

Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PAShooter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I have a friend who uses it for hunting in Colorado, Alaska, and even in Pennsylvania. He won it on a gun ticket some years ago, 700 BDL. I tried to buy it from him, but he wouldn't part with it. He said that he loves shooting it. It holds about 90 grains of powder with a good charge.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

If my memory serves me right, there wasn't to much in advertisement on the cartridge and 2nd, it probably wasn't name correctly, perhaps 32 Rem Mag?

Zips a 150 grain at 3462 fps and thumps a 220 at 2849 fps, pretty impressive. But in all the years shooting, I don't remember coming across one.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from hfedder40 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

my uncle has an 8mm mauser it is pretty old the stock was cut and shortened for him wen he was younger

-1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I only knew one guy that had one and he deer hunted with it. Haven't talked to him for years.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

I shot one once. I believe it is one of those rounds that punishes on both ends of the rifle.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

hfedder40

With all due respect, saying your uncle has an 8mm Mauser, is like telling the guy that just climbed out of the conventional Pete' you have a truck; and it's a Ford F150.
Yeah, they're both "trucks". Just like 8mm Mauser and 8mm Rem Mag are both "guns".

Bubba

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Arthur Igo wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

No, but I spent the night at Holiday Inn Express......

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from crm3006 wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

FirstBubba-
hfedder40 is very caliber challenged, 11 years old, and has a lot to say that does not fit the subject matter, or matter very much, for that matter! 'Nuff said?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

caliber challenged lol^^^

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

It's a beast and probably is the perfect elk cartridge, maybe even more than you need. It's got more juice than the .338 Winchester, and I'm sure it's just horrifying with some nice hot handloads.

8mms tend to fail in the US, especially ones that report and recoil like this one.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from J4huntfish wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

caliber challenged LOL

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PAShooter wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

8mm=.315 caliber, I think the case was very similar to the 375 H&H case in the 8mm rem mag.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PAShooter wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Some of the ultra mag Remingtons have a load of over 100 grains of powder. Never shot one , but know someone who uses it every year for elk.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

I rarely write on rifles I have no experience shooting or using hunting. But here goes, know a few sophisticated hunters who rave about the 8mm Remm Mag never any users back away because of criticism. Have heard the issues have been firstly, lack of U.S. interest in 8mm, in Europe it is the equivalent of our 300. It fits between our 300s and the 338, maybe not a big niche here. Lastly, not a big selection of bullets, or indeed, factory ammo.
Just a couple of thoughts. Have thought of owning one, but have other calibers that seem to do the job as well.
Craig Boddington and Terry Wieland have both written well on this caliber. It is a 375 H&H necked down to a 323, with the shoulder removed. Hope my info is accurate, and does not confuse.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Oh, never heard anyone complain about the recoil. Must say it is big caliber, but by todays standards not a huge round.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Not having much experience with "African" calibers, though I did get to run nearly a full box of ammo through a .458 Win. (Mildly surprised at recoil!)
The few 8mm RM shooters I've talked to say recoil is, shall we say, "Remarkable!!!", to say the least!

Bubba

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 358normamag wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Happy Myles hit it out of the ball park. He is exactly right. 7mm is the only metric caliber that has ever really done well here in the US.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Other than the 5.56 X 45 and the 7.62 X 51. They were metric before they were "convoited."

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 358normamag wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

That's true. But those are military designations and both Remington and Winchester got rid of the metric military designation when they commercialized those cartridges. You may also note that Winchester named their short mag the .325 WSM rather that 8mm WSM.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Fair enough.

How about the 9 mm Parabellum then?

Pistol cartridge, I know.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 358normamag wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

think it’s a different story in the case of the 9mm. When the military switched over to the 9mm a lot of law enforcement agencies followed suit and it became a popular pistol cartridge here in the US because of it.

The 9mm is also not considered a sporting cartridge so I’m not really sure you can link its success or failure in the same way.

I’m not saying that a metric nomenclature is certain death for a commercial cartridge here in the US. But it does seem to be the case for the 8mm.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

If the 8mm had more bullet choices, it might be a good choice

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I think the 7mm STW is not far behind it on the way to Dodoland.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 358normamag wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I think the 7mm STW is probably on the way out because of the 7mm RUM. The RUM offers the same performance without the belted case. Although I doubt that either will ever be as popular as the 7mm Rem Mag. There is obviously no shortage of 7mm cartridges out there these days; Remington did a good job marketing the 7mm Rem Mag and it paved the way for all the other 7mm cartridges here in the US. The written exploits of Karamajo Bell and the 7x57 probably had a large impact as well.

If a caliber is made popular to the masses the bullet makers will offer more choices in that caliber. It’s a vicious circle and has more to do with marketing and popularity than it does with performance.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rmhz1979 wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I own an 8mm Rem Mag in an old Rem 700 bdl (I believe it was made in 1978) I shoot 180 grain nosler balistic tips and get around 3150 fps if I remember correctly. The recoil is about as much as I would personally care to tollerate without it having a muzzle brake. I am 235lbs and when I cracked a round out of it to shoot a deer it rocked my body back. This is not a gun for a recoil sensative person. With that said I bought it because I like to be different. It's a caliber not many people even know exsist let alone would even try to use. It's almost a must to be a reloader for it or you will have to buy Rem's 1 load Double Tap's loads or pay a fortune for Noslers loads for it. The caliber it self is no doubt be plenty big enough for anything on the north american continent (maybe considered slightly small for brown bear but double tap does load 250 grain ammunition for it).

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I vote that a 200 grain load out of the 8mm Rem Mag is adequate for brown bear too.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kevin Madsen wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

I have a 8mm Rem Mag. Yes, with maximum loads, it kicks hard. But since you allmost have to handload for it you can talor your loads down to 308 Win kick. I did just that to meat hunt and got a deer (30yd) and elk (250yd). 200 gr going at about 2,500fps. My second load is 160 gr at over 3,100 fps (mild). I have planned to develop a high power load with the 200gr.

It's parent is the 375 H&H necked down while it in turn is the parent of the 7mm Shooting Times Western.

It was originally produced on a commercial scale from 1977 - 1984 and is still made in Remingtons custom shop. It never took the market share away from the 300s or 338, it seems that US has never had a love affair with the 8mm. Plus when it was originally produced it was often reloaded with a bullet not suited to its high velocities and bullets failed. Now there are bullets produced specifically for it. I feel that there are adequate bullets for it but normally the 200gr is the only one widely availible. However, the range of bullet goes from 160gr to 250gr or so.

Barnes has a new bullet out that tames the recoil and gives it longer range, 160 gr.

The problem now is that one needs to plan ahead to reload it as the brass is not allways in stock.

I am asured that with a well constructed bullet in 200 gr it is good for Brown Bear, Elk, and all but African's big five. The Barnes 160 gr should work nicely for pronghorn to Elk.

It is just one of those mid calibers that while common across the ocean never took hold here.

kev7griz@yahoo.com I have more info

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kevin Madsen wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

It is .323 caliber (shots a .323 bullet) and has a .315 bore diam. Just like 30 cal has a bore diam of .300 and a bullet diam (due to rifling) of .308

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from whitetailfreek wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

There are 8mm bullets that are a .329 diameter. They are few and far between, but the 8x56R that I own is chambered for such pills.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ron Heinz wrote 5 days 22 hours ago

I have a friend that shoots one- lets just say 200gr bullet at 2900fps generates 33lbs of recoil - 9 lb rifle. You can up the powder charge and go up towards 40lb of recoil- better him than me. In my book - it is a dead cartridge- not worth it. If it is a gift or present - I would sell it to build a 338-06. Would I buy an 8mm mag? No, I would not. Let it die off because there is better out there that generates less recoil and burns less powder with more reloading components and dies available.

Alaska:

An alternative with a whole lot less recoil is the 338-06. I do not believe in magnums. They burn 50% to 100% more powder and generate excessive 30% to 50% more recoil for hunting use at 300yds and under. Good premium constructed bullets and proper shot placement with enough time spent behind your rifle to get to know it is more important then generating flinch factors and poor shot placement on a hunt of a lifetime.

.338-06 A-Square is a better lower recoil 24lbs at 200gr 2800fps and 28lbs for 250gr 2500fps. The 338-06 is a barrel change from a 30-06 rifle and a reloaders dream. There are plenty of .338 bullets to use the necked up 30-06 brass cases in the weight range of 200gr - 250gr .338 bullets. You can download the 200gr bullets to 2650fps at around 20lb of recoil and keep a few heavy hitter 250gr on hand with POA / POI knowledge for dangerous game encounters at 28lb recoil. There is a difference in sniping a bear at 100 to 200yds and hunting one under 70yds where he can come at you in a few bounds. A 338-06 at 250gr 2500fps 3,500ft lbs energy is minimum for that close quarters scenario. A 338 Win Mag gives you 2650fps / 3,900ft lbs of energy but with greater powder waste and significant more recoil.

Since I stay in the lower 48-

I will stick with my 30-06 - mule deer / elk and 22lb recoil with 200gr Accubonds. 46gr Varget 2650fps / 180gr Gamekings 47gr 2750fps 1/2 inch accuracy at 100yds. I choose shot placement over extra recoil and powder wasted. Plus, Varget works in 270 Win 1/2 groups for me too- 44gr at 2800fps 150gr sierra's - elk / deer / antelope. Jack O'Connor used them and killed everything with 130gr's at 3100fps with a 4x optic. They just work without excessive powder waste and recoil. People and kill elk with 270's, 308 win, 30-06 all the time. The hype is from the gun industry that you need some "magnum" to do it. That is just to get you to buy more powder and guns you don’t need- you might want, but don’t need.

8mm Rem Mag? If it was a gift- I would sell it and get a 338-06 Shilen barrel in stainless for a stainless action 30-06 Rem 700, 2-7x35mm Burris or 3-9x40mm Burris Fullfield II, DNZ low one piece mount, do a 3 lb trigger adjustment- HS Precision alum bedded stock for a 9 lb rifle. That Rifle has the 2,500 to 3,600ft lb energy and bullet selection to enjoy a much lower recoiling factor that is bench rest accurate in quality. It would have enough energy to take what ever North American Game you want in CXP2 and CXP3 class. A rifle is an investment and lifelong tool to me. If I did not have the option to upgrade- I would sell the 8mm mag and get a 338 Win Mag bare bone stainless rifle. It has a lot more going for it on reloading options then the obsolete 8mm Rem Mag with same recoil factors involved.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Denny Fillmore wrote 22 sec ago

A huntin' bud bought one new about 1979. With 220gr loads it was fairly fierce in the recoil department. He killed two bucks with it using heavy bullets, then I gave him part of a box of the Sierra 150gr .323 spitzers I loaded in an 8x57 Mauser at the time.

That was his primary deer killer for most of the next 20 years, many of which were killed beyond 500 yards from a bipod.

Much more enjoyable to shoot with 150gr bullets and very accurate. And had he elected to head west for elk or big bears, that thing would've handled the chore with a heavier bullet.

Another bud had taken elk and other critters with a 375 H&H (Parker Hale) and liked the 8mm Rem. mag a bit better.

0 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Reply

from Happy Myles wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

I rarely write on rifles I have no experience shooting or using hunting. But here goes, know a few sophisticated hunters who rave about the 8mm Remm Mag never any users back away because of criticism. Have heard the issues have been firstly, lack of U.S. interest in 8mm, in Europe it is the equivalent of our 300. It fits between our 300s and the 338, maybe not a big niche here. Lastly, not a big selection of bullets, or indeed, factory ammo.
Just a couple of thoughts. Have thought of owning one, but have other calibers that seem to do the job as well.
Craig Boddington and Terry Wieland have both written well on this caliber. It is a 375 H&H necked down to a 323, with the shoulder removed. Hope my info is accurate, and does not confuse.

+3 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

If my memory serves me right, there wasn't to much in advertisement on the cartridge and 2nd, it probably wasn't name correctly, perhaps 32 Rem Mag?

Zips a 150 grain at 3462 fps and thumps a 220 at 2849 fps, pretty impressive. But in all the years shooting, I don't remember coming across one.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from PAShooter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I have a friend who uses it for hunting in Colorado, Alaska, and even in Pennsylvania. He won it on a gun ticket some years ago, 700 BDL. I tried to buy it from him, but he wouldn't part with it. He said that he loves shooting it. It holds about 90 grains of powder with a good charge.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

hfedder40

With all due respect, saying your uncle has an 8mm Mauser, is like telling the guy that just climbed out of the conventional Pete' you have a truck; and it's a Ford F150.
Yeah, they're both "trucks". Just like 8mm Mauser and 8mm Rem Mag are both "guns".

Bubba

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Arthur Igo wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

No, but I spent the night at Holiday Inn Express......

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from crm3006 wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

FirstBubba-
hfedder40 is very caliber challenged, 11 years old, and has a lot to say that does not fit the subject matter, or matter very much, for that matter! 'Nuff said?

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Happy Myles wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Oh, never heard anyone complain about the recoil. Must say it is big caliber, but by todays standards not a huge round.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 7 weeks ago

Not having much experience with "African" calibers, though I did get to run nearly a full box of ammo through a .458 Win. (Mildly surprised at recoil!)
The few 8mm RM shooters I've talked to say recoil is, shall we say, "Remarkable!!!", to say the least!

Bubba

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Other than the 5.56 X 45 and the 7.62 X 51. They were metric before they were "convoited."

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 358normamag wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

That's true. But those are military designations and both Remington and Winchester got rid of the metric military designation when they commercialized those cartridges. You may also note that Winchester named their short mag the .325 WSM rather that 8mm WSM.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

In my little circle of gun nuts, I only know of one in posession, and he hunts white tails with it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from casey11 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

never even heard of an 8mm

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

It was billed as the perfect elk cartridge by many hunting and shooting writers. I would say that it is close if one wants to handle the recoil and blast.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 007 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

My friend that owns one is a BIG boy so he can probably stand up behind it.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Best I remember, the cartridge itself dwarfed even the .300 Win Mag. Can't remember that the store I worked in ever sold but one. It was in a Rem 700 BDL. It was bought by a little skinny guy that probably didn't weigh 160 lbs. He said recoil wasn't that bad, but he couldn't shoot his "triple deuce" for accuracy same day he shot the 8 mag. LOL!!!

Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

I only knew one guy that had one and he deer hunted with it. Haven't talked to him for years.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from DSMbirddog wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

I shot one once. I believe it is one of those rounds that punishes on both ends of the rifle.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from scratchgolf72 wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

caliber challenged lol^^^

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from shane wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

It's a beast and probably is the perfect elk cartridge, maybe even more than you need. It's got more juice than the .338 Winchester, and I'm sure it's just horrifying with some nice hot handloads.

8mms tend to fail in the US, especially ones that report and recoil like this one.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from J4huntfish wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

caliber challenged LOL

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PAShooter wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

8mm=.315 caliber, I think the case was very similar to the 375 H&H case in the 8mm rem mag.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from PAShooter wrote 3 years 8 weeks ago

Some of the ultra mag Remingtons have a load of over 100 grains of powder. Never shot one , but know someone who uses it every year for elk.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 358normamag wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Happy Myles hit it out of the ball park. He is exactly right. 7mm is the only metric caliber that has ever really done well here in the US.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Amflyer wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

Fair enough.

How about the 9 mm Parabellum then?

Pistol cartridge, I know.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 358normamag wrote 3 years 3 weeks ago

think it’s a different story in the case of the 9mm. When the military switched over to the 9mm a lot of law enforcement agencies followed suit and it became a popular pistol cartridge here in the US because of it.

The 9mm is also not considered a sporting cartridge so I’m not really sure you can link its success or failure in the same way.

I’m not saying that a metric nomenclature is certain death for a commercial cartridge here in the US. But it does seem to be the case for the 8mm.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Clay Cooper wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

If the 8mm had more bullet choices, it might be a good choice

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I think the 7mm STW is not far behind it on the way to Dodoland.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from 358normamag wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I think the 7mm STW is probably on the way out because of the 7mm RUM. The RUM offers the same performance without the belted case. Although I doubt that either will ever be as popular as the 7mm Rem Mag. There is obviously no shortage of 7mm cartridges out there these days; Remington did a good job marketing the 7mm Rem Mag and it paved the way for all the other 7mm cartridges here in the US. The written exploits of Karamajo Bell and the 7x57 probably had a large impact as well.

If a caliber is made popular to the masses the bullet makers will offer more choices in that caliber. It’s a vicious circle and has more to do with marketing and popularity than it does with performance.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from rmhz1979 wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I own an 8mm Rem Mag in an old Rem 700 bdl (I believe it was made in 1978) I shoot 180 grain nosler balistic tips and get around 3150 fps if I remember correctly. The recoil is about as much as I would personally care to tollerate without it having a muzzle brake. I am 235lbs and when I cracked a round out of it to shoot a deer it rocked my body back. This is not a gun for a recoil sensative person. With that said I bought it because I like to be different. It's a caliber not many people even know exsist let alone would even try to use. It's almost a must to be a reloader for it or you will have to buy Rem's 1 load Double Tap's loads or pay a fortune for Noslers loads for it. The caliber it self is no doubt be plenty big enough for anything on the north american continent (maybe considered slightly small for brown bear but double tap does load 250 grain ammunition for it).

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from WA Mtnhunter wrote 3 years 2 weeks ago

I vote that a 200 grain load out of the 8mm Rem Mag is adequate for brown bear too.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kevin Madsen wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

I have a 8mm Rem Mag. Yes, with maximum loads, it kicks hard. But since you allmost have to handload for it you can talor your loads down to 308 Win kick. I did just that to meat hunt and got a deer (30yd) and elk (250yd). 200 gr going at about 2,500fps. My second load is 160 gr at over 3,100 fps (mild). I have planned to develop a high power load with the 200gr.

It's parent is the 375 H&H necked down while it in turn is the parent of the 7mm Shooting Times Western.

It was originally produced on a commercial scale from 1977 - 1984 and is still made in Remingtons custom shop. It never took the market share away from the 300s or 338, it seems that US has never had a love affair with the 8mm. Plus when it was originally produced it was often reloaded with a bullet not suited to its high velocities and bullets failed. Now there are bullets produced specifically for it. I feel that there are adequate bullets for it but normally the 200gr is the only one widely availible. However, the range of bullet goes from 160gr to 250gr or so.

Barnes has a new bullet out that tames the recoil and gives it longer range, 160 gr.

The problem now is that one needs to plan ahead to reload it as the brass is not allways in stock.

I am asured that with a well constructed bullet in 200 gr it is good for Brown Bear, Elk, and all but African's big five. The Barnes 160 gr should work nicely for pronghorn to Elk.

It is just one of those mid calibers that while common across the ocean never took hold here.

kev7griz@yahoo.com I have more info

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Kevin Madsen wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

It is .323 caliber (shots a .323 bullet) and has a .315 bore diam. Just like 30 cal has a bore diam of .300 and a bullet diam (due to rifling) of .308

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from whitetailfreek wrote 2 years 23 weeks ago

There are 8mm bullets that are a .329 diameter. They are few and far between, but the 8x56R that I own is chambered for such pills.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Ron Heinz wrote 5 days 22 hours ago

I have a friend that shoots one- lets just say 200gr bullet at 2900fps generates 33lbs of recoil - 9 lb rifle. You can up the powder charge and go up towards 40lb of recoil- better him than me. In my book - it is a dead cartridge- not worth it. If it is a gift or present - I would sell it to build a 338-06. Would I buy an 8mm mag? No, I would not. Let it die off because there is better out there that generates less recoil and burns less powder with more reloading components and dies available.

Alaska:

An alternative with a whole lot less recoil is the 338-06. I do not believe in magnums. They burn 50% to 100% more powder and generate excessive 30% to 50% more recoil for hunting use at 300yds and under. Good premium constructed bullets and proper shot placement with enough time spent behind your rifle to get to know it is more important then generating flinch factors and poor shot placement on a hunt of a lifetime.

.338-06 A-Square is a better lower recoil 24lbs at 200gr 2800fps and 28lbs for 250gr 2500fps. The 338-06 is a barrel change from a 30-06 rifle and a reloaders dream. There are plenty of .338 bullets to use the necked up 30-06 brass cases in the weight range of 200gr - 250gr .338 bullets. You can download the 200gr bullets to 2650fps at around 20lb of recoil and keep a few heavy hitter 250gr on hand with POA / POI knowledge for dangerous game encounters at 28lb recoil. There is a difference in sniping a bear at 100 to 200yds and hunting one under 70yds where he can come at you in a few bounds. A 338-06 at 250gr 2500fps 3,500ft lbs energy is minimum for that close quarters scenario. A 338 Win Mag gives you 2650fps / 3,900ft lbs of energy but with greater powder waste and significant more recoil.

Since I stay in the lower 48-

I will stick with my 30-06 - mule deer / elk and 22lb recoil with 200gr Accubonds. 46gr Varget 2650fps / 180gr Gamekings 47gr 2750fps 1/2 inch accuracy at 100yds. I choose shot placement over extra recoil and powder wasted. Plus, Varget works in 270 Win 1/2 groups for me too- 44gr at 2800fps 150gr sierra's - elk / deer / antelope. Jack O'Connor used them and killed everything with 130gr's at 3100fps with a 4x optic. They just work without excessive powder waste and recoil. People and kill elk with 270's, 308 win, 30-06 all the time. The hype is from the gun industry that you need some "magnum" to do it. That is just to get you to buy more powder and guns you don’t need- you might want, but don’t need.

8mm Rem Mag? If it was a gift- I would sell it and get a 338-06 Shilen barrel in stainless for a stainless action 30-06 Rem 700, 2-7x35mm Burris or 3-9x40mm Burris Fullfield II, DNZ low one piece mount, do a 3 lb trigger adjustment- HS Precision alum bedded stock for a 9 lb rifle. That Rifle has the 2,500 to 3,600ft lb energy and bullet selection to enjoy a much lower recoiling factor that is bench rest accurate in quality. It would have enough energy to take what ever North American Game you want in CXP2 and CXP3 class. A rifle is an investment and lifelong tool to me. If I did not have the option to upgrade- I would sell the 8mm mag and get a 338 Win Mag bare bone stainless rifle. It has a lot more going for it on reloading options then the obsolete 8mm Rem Mag with same recoil factors involved.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Denny Fillmore wrote 23 sec ago

A huntin' bud bought one new about 1979. With 220gr loads it was fairly fierce in the recoil department. He killed two bucks with it using heavy bullets, then I gave him part of a box of the Sierra 150gr .323 spitzers I loaded in an 8x57 Mauser at the time.

That was his primary deer killer for most of the next 20 years, many of which were killed beyond 500 yards from a bipod.

Much more enjoyable to shoot with 150gr bullets and very accurate. And had he elected to head west for elk or big bears, that thing would've handled the chore with a heavier bullet.

Another bud had taken elk and other critters with a 375 H&H (Parker Hale) and liked the 8mm Rem. mag a bit better.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from hfedder40 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

my uncle has an 8mm mauser it is pretty old the stock was cut and shortened for him wen he was younger

-1 Good Comment? | | Report

Post a Reply

bmxbiz-fs