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Deer Hunting

Deer feeder or not?

Uploaded on July 13, 2010

I'm new to baiting deer so am experimenting with different options. I have 17, wooded acres below my home. I created a site, putting out corn and salt on the ground. I have a trail cam posted nearby to record activity. It didn't take the deer long to find it. I had several does and bucks visiting the site at all hours of the day. My friend suggested putting in a deer feeder that would disperse corn twice per day. I followed his suggestion and have seen a drastic decrease in deer activity. The one doe now visiting the site keeps looking up at the feeder. Kind of comical. He's indicating that it will take awhile for the deer to become accustomed to the feeder. My fear is using the feeder at all because of the mechanical noise it makes everytime it goes off. I also had an elk visiting the site that hasn't showed since I hung the feeder. It's close enough to my home that I can stock the site every few days without a problem. Should I eliminate the feeder and go back to what I was originally doing? I know I lose the option of timed feeding and possibly patterning the deer but I'm leary the big bucks won't come within two miles of a mechanical feeder unless it's during a time of the year when they're either rutting or there's a lack of food. Thoughts? Thanks very much.

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All Replies
from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 39 weeks ago

During the Primitive Arms season last fall, I had a doe "suspect" all wasn't as it seemed. Shortly after I was able to get my rifle up, my feeder went off! I just knew the gig was up, but the deer never flinched, and eventually came in to the feeder and gave me a clear shot.
It always amazes me as to what deer will accept as the "norm" in their habitats.
One buddy killed a near B&C buck that drank from his above ground pool every morning!
I use the smaller hanging feeders that are light triggered twice per day. They are easier for an old cripple to deal with, but have to be serviced about once per week.
I have a larger, tri-pod feeder, but have to carry three or four sacks of corn plus a ladder to service.
There are "feeder" options out there that are "non" mechanical (gravity feed) and make NO noise. Some of these feeders can be made with materials found around the home.
I like feeders.
It gives me a chance to see what is in the area. When they come in to feed, I get the opportunity to select which animal I prefer to cull/harvest.
Just because an animal comes to a feeder doesn't mean I gotta shoot it!
They also have a device that imitates the sound of a feeder going off, NO FEED! I understand in South Texas, they bring the deer out of the brush on the run! LOL!!!

Bubba

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from kentuckyslickhead wrote 3 years 39 weeks ago

Think of it this way. a highway makes alot of noise. you still see wildlife all around it. so once they notice the noise is not going to harm them they will bypass it like they never heard it. With timed feeding the deer will, after a few weeks, will come accustomed to the time as you know and you will pattern them perfectly. Making them easier to harvest. Feeders are a great idea in my opinion.

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from justina45 wrote 3 years 39 weeks ago

not.the sqierlis will get into it

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from machinegunner wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I do not feed, I plant, they (deer) feed themselves. In the long run I ahve more success with food plots then a pile of stuff on the ground. IMHO.

good luck with what ever you do.

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from BioGuy wrote 3 years 37 weeks ago

If you have the acreage, the time, and some money to spare, look into starting a small food plot. A clover and chicory mix makes for a great perennial plot. Also, look into other options for increasing the amount of natural food sources on your property. Timber stand improvement, fertilizing and pruning fruit bearing trees, fertilizing field edges, and creating browse cuts are all great ways of ensuring your deer have continuous sources of nutrition. Good luck!

-2 Good Comment? | | Report
from sankie13 wrote 3 years 28 weeks ago

I've always hunted over feeders it's just the way we've always done it. I've never had a problem with a feeder scaring off deer or deer feeling uncomfortable around it. However, I still feel that food plots are the better choice just because I feel they will pull in more deer. The expenses are greater on food plots but if you can do it I think it would work out better in the long run.

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from Keith Costley wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Most deer get use to the noise the feeder makes and readily comes to it. The actual sound of the feeder sets off the feeding alarm. Obviously, the more feed you put out, the more deer and other critter that will visit the site. How much money do you want to shell out for feed? That's my primary question.

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from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

We use feeders on our property and the cost gets into almost a thousand or two dollars for the entire year. That is running 4 feeders 12 months out of the year. I know guys that spend 4 or 5 times that much and not think anything about it. When it comes to hunting guys don't really care how much money is expended or at least it seems that way. Planting food plots is really expensive if you plant very big plots or very many plots. Fertilizer, lime , seed and getting the ground ready cost alot of money.

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from clintsurber wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

That mechanical feeder noise is the best deer call you can use.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report

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from kentuckyslickhead wrote 3 years 39 weeks ago

Think of it this way. a highway makes alot of noise. you still see wildlife all around it. so once they notice the noise is not going to harm them they will bypass it like they never heard it. With timed feeding the deer will, after a few weeks, will come accustomed to the time as you know and you will pattern them perfectly. Making them easier to harvest. Feeders are a great idea in my opinion.

+2 Good Comment? | | Report
from clintsurber wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

That mechanical feeder noise is the best deer call you can use.

+1 Good Comment? | | Report
from FirstBubba wrote 3 years 39 weeks ago

During the Primitive Arms season last fall, I had a doe "suspect" all wasn't as it seemed. Shortly after I was able to get my rifle up, my feeder went off! I just knew the gig was up, but the deer never flinched, and eventually came in to the feeder and gave me a clear shot.
It always amazes me as to what deer will accept as the "norm" in their habitats.
One buddy killed a near B&C buck that drank from his above ground pool every morning!
I use the smaller hanging feeders that are light triggered twice per day. They are easier for an old cripple to deal with, but have to be serviced about once per week.
I have a larger, tri-pod feeder, but have to carry three or four sacks of corn plus a ladder to service.
There are "feeder" options out there that are "non" mechanical (gravity feed) and make NO noise. Some of these feeders can be made with materials found around the home.
I like feeders.
It gives me a chance to see what is in the area. When they come in to feed, I get the opportunity to select which animal I prefer to cull/harvest.
Just because an animal comes to a feeder doesn't mean I gotta shoot it!
They also have a device that imitates the sound of a feeder going off, NO FEED! I understand in South Texas, they bring the deer out of the brush on the run! LOL!!!

Bubba

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from justina45 wrote 3 years 39 weeks ago

not.the sqierlis will get into it

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from machinegunner wrote 3 years 38 weeks ago

I do not feed, I plant, they (deer) feed themselves. In the long run I ahve more success with food plots then a pile of stuff on the ground. IMHO.

good luck with what ever you do.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from sankie13 wrote 3 years 28 weeks ago

I've always hunted over feeders it's just the way we've always done it. I've never had a problem with a feeder scaring off deer or deer feeling uncomfortable around it. However, I still feel that food plots are the better choice just because I feel they will pull in more deer. The expenses are greater on food plots but if you can do it I think it would work out better in the long run.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Keith Costley wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

Most deer get use to the noise the feeder makes and readily comes to it. The actual sound of the feeder sets off the feeding alarm. Obviously, the more feed you put out, the more deer and other critter that will visit the site. How much money do you want to shell out for feed? That's my primary question.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from Sarge01 wrote 3 years 9 weeks ago

We use feeders on our property and the cost gets into almost a thousand or two dollars for the entire year. That is running 4 feeders 12 months out of the year. I know guys that spend 4 or 5 times that much and not think anything about it. When it comes to hunting guys don't really care how much money is expended or at least it seems that way. Planting food plots is really expensive if you plant very big plots or very many plots. Fertilizer, lime , seed and getting the ground ready cost alot of money.

0 Good Comment? | | Report
from BioGuy wrote 3 years 37 weeks ago

If you have the acreage, the time, and some money to spare, look into starting a small food plot. A clover and chicory mix makes for a great perennial plot. Also, look into other options for increasing the amount of natural food sources on your property. Timber stand improvement, fertilizing and pruning fruit bearing trees, fertilizing field edges, and creating browse cuts are all great ways of ensuring your deer have continuous sources of nutrition. Good luck!

-2 Good Comment? | | Report

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